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MASTING COMPANY, IK 









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RECEIVED 

MAR 26 1951 

Second half 9 vol. 4 



JULY THROUGH 
DECEMBER 1950 

Issued every six months 



Automotive and Lubricants 

Local auto dealer reports unusual radio suc- 
cess 

Automobile activities in radio/TV forecast 

Shell shows how to keep dealers happy 

Ford dealer buys vacation program 

Gulf Oil promotes products through safety 

campaign 

Radio/TV outdraw newspapers in Amoco test 

Chevrolet sponsors Notre Dame games 

Atlantic Refining's football sponsorship. _ 

Chevrolet's unique spot commercials 

How Ford dealer grossed $83,824 in 24 hours 



Broadcast Advertising Problems 
Developments 

What's happening to radio networks in TV 
era? 

Merchandising is like fingerprints 

All quiet on the TV union front 

How TV union problems differ from radio's..- 

Sponsor's view of World War II 

What should advertisers do about radio/TV 
budgets in face of defense-imposed 
scarcities ? 

Ad strategy to meet Korean situation 

What can sponsors do about incidents like 
Jean Muir's? 

Why sponsors are cold to nighttime network 
radio 

Network's reply to sponsors' appraisal of night- 
time radio 

Industry-wide audience promotion advocated 
to sell radio 

Will radio rates increase in non-TV markets? 



3 July 


P. 


35 


17 July 


P- 


29 


14 Aug. 


P- 


22 


28 Aug. 


P- 


45 


11 Sept. 


P- 


44 


11 Sept. 


P- 


45 


25 Sept. 


P- 


20 


25 Sept. 


P- 


32 


6 Nov. 


P- 


41 


4 Dec. 


P- 


42 



and 



17 


July 


P. 


79 


28 Aug. 


P- 


21 


28 Aug. 


P- 


28 


28 Aug. 


P- 


42 


11 


Sept. 


P- 


32 


25 


Sept. 


P- 


38 


9 


Oct. 


P- 


42 


23 


Oct. 


P- 


38 


6 


Nov. 


P- 


24 


20 


Nov. 


P- 


21 


4 


Dec. 


P- 


28 


4 


Dec. 


P- 


36 



Clothing 



Novel quiz show sells for Richmond clothing 

concern 

Sanson Hosiery Mills' one-shot TV success 

Furs on the air 

Cowboys sell clothes in radio 

Brassiere sales get a lift via TV 



Robert Hall continues strong air promotion ... 
Frank B. Sawdon, Robert Hall Clothes, profile 
Miles Shoe Stores' transcribed commercials .... 

Robert Hall's transcribed commercials 

Clothing stores on the air 

Selling "unmentionables" on the air ... 

Commercials atiff Sales 1 ids 

Announcer's importance in radio sales pitch ... 

Mail orders thrive via TV 

Singing commercials, trends, costs, who makes 

them, who uses them 

TV station breaks sell for Horton's Ice Cream 
Low pressure commercials sell tours over 

WABF, New York 

Sales theme during World War II 

Brassiere sales commercials on TV 

Sponsors like spot radio 

Inside story of an animated commercial 

TV pitchman in the parlor 

Department store's camouflaged commercials 

Inside story «f a film commercial 

Transcribing a commercial _~ 



Confections and Soft Drinks 

W. S. Brown, Canada Dry Ginger Ale, profile 
Soft drinks on the air _ 



3 July 


P- 


35 


31 July 


P- 


16 


31 July 


P- 


32 


11 Sept. 


P- 


21 


25 Sept. 


P- 


20 


23 Oct. 


P- 


18 


6 Nov. 


P- 


16 


20 Nov. 


P- 


26 


20 Nov. 


P- 


26 


20 Nov. 


P- 


32 


4 Dec. 


P- 


34 


Aids 

3 July 


P- 


34 


17 July 


P- 


22 


17 July 


P- 


43 


31 July 


P- 


40 


14 Aug. 


P- 


39 


11 Sept. 


P- 


32 


25 Sept. 


P- 


20 


25 Sept. 


P- 


30 


9 Oct. 


P- 


28 


9 Oct. 


P- 


34 


9 Oct. 


P- 


47 


23 Oct. 


P- 


26 


20 Nov. 


P- 


26 


inks 






3 July 


P- 


14 


3 July 


P- 


19 



Candy strong on T\ _. 17 J u ly 

Horton's Ice Cream TV station breaks ... 31 July 

Cisco Kid sells Coca-Cola 11 Sept. 

Developments in soft drinks industry 20 Nov. 

Contests and Offers 

Telephone quiz shows growing 3 July 

Type of sponsors using telephone shows 17 July 

Syndicated telephone shows available 17 July 

Use of premiums on radio and TV 17 July 

What's doing on contest front? 17 July 

Telephone shows guarantee low-cost audience 31 July 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

G. J. Abrams, Block Drug Company, profile 17 July 

Alka-Seltzer sales soared with barn dance 

broadcasts _ 31 July 

Rhodes Pharmacal Company signs Gabriel 

Heatter 28 Aug. 

Drug stores on the air 28 Aug. 

St. Joseph Aspirin likes Westerns 11 Sept. 

Basil L. Emery, Chesebrough Mfg. Co., profile 25 Sept. 

How Bristol-Myers rides the trends 9 Oct. 

Peoples Drug Stores in Washington go all out 

with radio 23 Oct. 

Bristol-Myers using TV heavily 23 Oct. 

Hadacol's sales prescription is advertising .... 23 Oct. 

Selling laxatives and deodorants on the air 4 Dec. 

W. A. Wright, Jules Montenier, Inc., profile.... 18 Dec. 

Hadacol packs 'em in 18 Dec. 

Farm Radio 

Influence of barn dances on rural and city au- 
diences 31 July 

Murphy Products (feed) a 20-year barn dance 

sponsor 31 July 

Doughboy knows the farmer 28 Aug. 

Farm director, a potent salesman 9 Oct. 



Food ttnd Beverages 

Borden's new emphasis: spot advertising 3 

Giant markets and chains showing interest in 

radio/TV 17 

Coffee firms must advertise to protect against 

competing brands 17 

Growing use of radio and TV resulting in 

increased volume for bread and cake 

companies _. 17 

John I. Moone, Snow Crop Marketers, Inc., 

profile 3 1 

Ralston Purina Company, Grand Ole Opry 

success 3 1 

Nabisco dog biscuit sales impact achieved 

with radio 31 

Taylor-Reed's TV success in selling Cocoa 

Marsh 11 

Breakfast food cereals do well with cowboy 

shows 11 

Victor Coffee began going places with radio 11 

Bakers on the air 25 

Food market's TV sales formula in Baltimore 25 
Lee Mack Marshall, Continental Baking Co., 

profile 9 

Chiquita Banana goes to TV cooking school ~ 9 

Hormel's triple-threat girls 9 

Grocery stores on the air 23 

Worcester Baking Company keeps ahead with 

radio ... 6 

Woman's hands sell food products on TV 6 

R. G. Partridge, United Fruit Company, pro- 
file . ..... 20 

Diiu^la^ Leigh, Leigh Foods, Inc., profile 4 



July 
July 
July 

July 
July 
July 
July 

Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 

Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 

Nov. 
Nov. 

Nov. 
Dec. 



p. 30 

p. 40 

p. 22 

p. 18 



p. 22 
p.108 
p.108 
p.114 
p.116 
p. 26 



p. 20 

p. 19 

p. 17 

p. 30 

p. 22 

p. 16 

p. 32 

p. 18 

p. 24 

p. 40 

p. 34 

p. 8 

p. 24 



p. 19 

p. 22 

p. 24 

p. 30 



p. 26 

p. 30 

p. 30 

p. 30 

p. 12 

p. 20 

p. 23 

p. 18 

p. 21 

p. 24 

p. 23 

p. 42 

p. 16 

p. 20 

p. 26 

p. 21 

p. 28 

p. 40 

p. 10 

p. 10 



BINDERS are available to accommodate six-month supply of issues indexed. Cost is $4.00 per binder. 



12 FEBRUARY 1951 



49 



Milk sales zoom via WTMA and Cisco Kid... 4 Dec. p. 43 

More about grocery store advertising 18 Dec. p. 16 

Margarine opportunity in radio/TV 18 Dec. p. 30 

CBS-WFBL sell for 55 food stores 18 Dec. p. 42 

insurance and Finance 

Seattle bank uses radio news with good results 28 Aug. p. 17 

Banks on the air 6 Nov. p. 26 

Why Metropolitan Life expanded radio budget 20 Nov. p. 28 

Miscellaneous Pro€iucts and Services 

How to sell a candidate _ 3 July p. 16 

Beer and wine companies using air media 

extensively . 17 July 

Quaker rug TV experience _ 14 Aug. 

Radio advertising and home demonstrations 

boost TV set sales 14 Aug. 

Storage business boosted by radio 28 Aug. 

60% of Mohawk Carpet budget going to TV 11 Sept. 

Houses sell like hot cakes via WSRS, Cleve- 
land 11 Sept. p. 44 

Miller Brewing Company, uses football formu- 
la for sales 25 Sept. 

Arthur Murray, profile 23 Oct. 

Kosher wines selling to booming mass market 23 Oct. 

Books on Radio/TV for ad managers 6 Nov. 

Oil burners, hot sales ftem on WFBR, Balti- 
more 6 Nov. 

Radio sells homes in volume in Eureka, Calif. 20 Nov. 



Programing 

Telephone gimmicks abound on the air 3 July 

Dummy is MC on clothing firm quiz show.... 3 July 

Bobby Benson Western-type show expands... 17 July 

Syndicated telephone shows available 17 July 

Radio barn dances, successful sales formula 31 July 

Nearly every station has telephone show 31 July 

KOME'S novel participation show 31 July 

Liberty's baseball broadcasts 14 Aug. 

Moppets hypo adult viewing 14 Aug. 

The Negro d.j. strikes it rich 14 Aug. 

Cowboy club corrals national capital kiddies 14 Aug. 

Tips to news sponsor 28 Aug. 

Beecham recordings sell baking products 11 Sept. 

How cowboys rate as radio salesmen 11 Sept. 

Football takes to the air in 1950 25 Sept. 

When to simulcast '~— 25 Sept. 

TV revives Wild-West fever . 25 Sept. 

Chiquita Banana's daytime TV chores 9 Oct. 

Radio mysteries rate high in listenership 9 Oct. 

Network musical show clicks for Hormel 9 Oct. 

Program trends key to Bristol-Myers radio 

success 9 Oct. 

TV mystery shows strong program fare 23 Oct. 

Taped TV shows lowering program costs 6 Nov. 

Network co-op programs 20 Nov. 

Advantages of network-built package shows ... 20 Nov. 

Local shows do great job for national sponsors 18 Dec. 

TV writer: key to program costs 18 Dec. 

Publicity ami Promotion 

Stimulating summer selling 3 July 

Balloon promotion pays off 3 July 

Station directs selling campaign to staff .. ._ 3 July 

Tucson station plugs summer selling campaign 3 July 

CBS launches biggest fall promotion II ^.ug. 

Merchandising is like lingi i pi ■int. .„_ 28 Aug. 

What station, do to help sponsors sell products 11 Sept. 
30,000 grocers, druggists take part in CBS 

promotion 20 Nov. 

Research 

Sindlinger's share-of-audience measurement . 3 July 

More detailed data on TV coverage sought 3 July 

llol-lia T\ study talk- dollars and cents 17 July 
\lilil. Lazarsfeld, Dun & Bradstreet studies 

show radio power 17 July 
Radio and TV research, techniques used 17 July 
Let's put all medki under same microscope .... 31 July 
Wli.it media team up besl with TV? ... 31 July 
Ohio State study discloses influence of mop- 
pets in TV viewing 14 Aug. 
Radio is getting bigger, recenl studies show 14 Aug. 
Radio gaining in non-TV areas, according to 

\\ \ \\ study 11 Sept. 

Getting the mosl oul of BMB 25 Sept. 



p. 31 

p. 17 

p. 26 

p. 45 

p. 28 



p. 20 

p. 16 

p. 30 

p. 32 



40 

II 



p. 22 
p. 35 
p. 22 
p.108 
p. 19 
p. 26 
p. 40 
p. 17 
p. 24 
p. 28 
p. 38 
p. 17 
P. 
P. 
p. 
P 
P 
P' 
P 
p. 



18 
21 
20 
26 
28 
20 
23 
26 

32 
32 
38 
30 
40 



P< 
P- 

P. 

I'- 
P- 
p. 21 
p. 32 



p. 16 

p. 34 

p. 34 

p. 35 



38 
21 
26 

44 



p. 24 

p. 30 

p. 48 

p. 52 
p.lll 

p. 24 

p. 30 

p. 24 

p. 30 

p. 30 

p. :;i 



The research muddle 23 Oct. 

Herbert True checks TV sponsor identification 

in Chicago 

Who's looking where? 

Advertest's looking vs. listening study 

Retail 

Clothing company in Richmond uses unique 

T\ formula for sales 3 July- 
Giant markets, chains using more radio/TV 17 July 

Drug stores on the air, roundup 28 Aug. 

Buffalo store scores sales success on WEBR 28 Aug. 

Food market's TV sales formula in Baltimore 25 Sept. 

Department store buys time to keep customers 

away 9 Oct. 

Department store's camouflaged commercials 9 Oct. 

Grocery stores on the air, roundup 23 Oct. 

Clothing stores on the air, roundup 20 Nov. 

Grocery store advertising pays off 18 Dec. 

CBS-WFBL sell for 55 food stores .. 18 Dec. 

Soaps, Cleansers, Toilet Gootls 

P&G, Golgate-Palmolive-Peet, and Lever Bros, 
riding high 



Robert Brenner, B. T. Babbitt Company, pro- 
file 

Sidney Weil, American Safety Razor Corp., 

profile 

Pears soap scores with radio 

How Duz does its commercials 

Pal Blade strategy clicks on radio 

Television 

More detailed data on TV coverage sought .... 
What part of budget should be allotted TV? 
TV sales punch illustrated in Hofstra study .. 

TV status in fall 1950 

One-shot TV success 

Vidicam cuts film cost 

Moppets influence adult nighttime viewing 

Taylor-Reed succeeds in TV debut 

60% of Mohawk budget going to TV 

TV sells brassieres _ 

TV revives Wild-West fever 

Daytime TV pioneering by Chiquita Banana 

Pitchman in the parlor 

Inside story of film commercial 

TV mysteries rated high 

Taped TV shows, a program cost factor 

Woman's hands sell foods on TV — 

Will color catch on? 

Tintebuying 

Outlook for time availabilities for inde- 
pendents ... 

What agencies would tell clients, if they dared 
Are radio/TV subjected to tougher scrutiny in 

selection of media?... 

What sponsors think of agencies 
How sectional agency can help national ac- 
count 

Ad strategy to meet Korean situation 

Why sponsors are cold to nighttime network 

radio _ 

Network co-op shows for spot buyers 

Confessions of a New York timebuyer 

What to sell in wartime 

Glamour boys of bigtime advertising 

Whit are the true conditions in timebuying? 

Tobacco 

Big radio/TV activity seen for cigarette com- 
panies 

Million, more call for Philip Morris 

Alexander Harris, Ronson Art Metal Works, 
profile 

R. J. Reynolds football plans 

How Brown & Williamson climbed to 25 bil- 
lion cigarettes . 

Biown & Williamson formula gives brands 
special appeal . 

Transcriptions 

National advertisers' use of transcriptions __ 
Library and program transcription services 
Transcriptions oiler low-cost, top-talent shows 



17 July 

28 Aug. 

11 Sept. 

11 Sept. 

20 Nov. 

4 Dec. 



3 July 

3 July 
17 July 
17 July 
31 July 
31 July 
14 Aug. 
11 Sept. 
11 Sept. 
25 Sept. 
25 Sept. 

9 Oct. 

9 Oct. 
23 Oct. 
23 Oct. 

6 Nov. 

6 Nov. 
20 Nov. 



28 



6 Nov. 


P- 


29 


4 Dec. 


P- 


L8 


4 Dec. 


P- 


29 



p. 35 

p. 30 

p. 30 

p. 44 

p. 42 

p. 46 

p. 47 

p. 21 

p. 32 

p. 16 

p. 42 



31 



p. 16 



16 
18 
26 

24 



p. 30 
p. 32 
p. 48 
p. 87 
p. 16 
p. 40 
p. 24 
p. 18 
p. 28 
p. 20 
p. 28 
p. 20 
p. 34 
p. 26 
p. 32 
p. 38 
p. 40 
p. 35 



31 July 


P- 


38 


14 Aug. 


P- 


19 


14 Aug. 


P- 


36 


28 Aug. 


P- 


26 


11 Sept. 


P- 


42 


9 Oct. 


P- 


42 


6 Nov. 


P- 


24 


20 Nov. 


P- 


30 


4 Dec. 


P- 


26 


18 Dec. 


p. 


26 


18 Dec. 


P- 


28 


18 Dec. 


P- 


34 



17 July- 
Si July 


P- 
P- 


31 

16 


14 Aug. 
25 Aug. 


P- 
P- 


14 
20 


6 Nov. 


P- 


21 


20 Nov. 


P- 


24 



17 July p. 55 

17 July p. 56 

4 Dec. p. 21 



SO 



SPONSOR 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor50sponno2 



I JULY 1950 



$8.00 a Year 




Kentuckiana's ONLY 

FOOD MERCHANDISING SHOW 

NOW GOES 5 DAYS A WEEK! 



DELMONIC 




50,000 WATTS * 1 A CLEAR CHANNEL * 840 KILOCYCLES 

The only radio station serving and selling 
all of the rich Kentuckiana Market 



VICTOR A. SHOLIS, D/recfor • NEIL D. CLINE, So/es Director 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY AND CO. • ASSOCIATED WITH THE COURIER-JOURNAL & LOUISVILLE TIMES 




TS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



1950 Iowa 

Radio Audience 

Survey 

tells all 



Mail order firm 

spending $20,000 

weekly on eight TV 

stations 

Two strong 

radio /TV 

agencies merge 



Sold-out sign 

at NBC-TV and 

CBS-TV 

Lone station 

subscribes to 

Starch studies 



What about 
TV standards? 



How many 

Negro disk 

jockeys? 



3 July 1950 

Thirteenth annual study of Iowa radio audience made by Dr. F. L. Whan, 
University of Wichita, for WHO, Des Moines, is tops in listener infor- 
mation. First tabulations of March 1950 study, embracing 9,215 inter- 
views, reveals about 50% of Iowa homes have two radios or more; over 
50% families have portable sets; total radio-equipped homes jumped 
from 91.4% to98.9% in decade; 14.2% of farmers have barn sets. Full 
study expected soon. 

-SR- 
RCW Enterprises, mail order experts, using eight scattered TV stations 
with five-minute nighttime participations, at record cost of $20,000 
weekly. But nearly 10,000 orders for Instant-photo are coming in 
daily enclosing $1 each. 

-SR- 
Dowd, Redfield & Johnstone, Inc., new $6,000,000 billing advertising 
agency combine, is looked to stir some radio/TV excitement in Manhat- 
tan. Both John C. Dowd, heretofore strictly Boston agency, and Red- 
f ield-Johnstone have been especially active in air media, including 
Block Drug, Colonial Airlines, Bell-Ans, First National Stores, Har- 
vard Beer. William Eynon, formerly with H. B. Humphrey, joined 1 July 
as Radio and TV Director. New coalition includes all personnel and 
accounts of Blaker Agency, New York, purchased by John C. Dowd prior 
to merger with Redf ield-Johnstone. Firm will occupy second floor at 
501 Madison. 

-SR- 
National advertisers wondering whether to use NBC or CBS television 
network facilities this fall have nothing to worry about. With few 
exceptions, there's not a thing open from morn to night. 

-SR- 
WBBM, Chicago, is only broadcast station using Starch reports on read- 
ing preferences and habits regularly. On own initiative, commercial 
manager Ralf Brent broke precedent by inducing Starch to accept sta- 
tion as subscriber, has just renewed for second year. 

-SR- 
Looks like urgently-needed TV standards and TV code will have to 
spring forth like Topsy. Better Business Bureaus are pushing both. 
NAB has hands full with other matters at moment, although new TV Di- 
rector Charles Batson is standards-code minded. 

-SR- 
Until recently a rarity, Negro disk jockeys are springing up every- 
where. Some, like Joe Adams, KOWL , Santa Monica, are doing landoffice 
business. Adams' 56 sponsors include national accounts like Plymouth, 
Manischewitz Wines, Milani Salad Dressing, Shinola Shoe Polish. KWKH, 
Shreveport, has white d.j. who draws Negro listeners in droves with 
simulated technique. Prominent-white-audience station in Georgia may 
soon take on first Negro d.j. SPONSOR will carry story in 31 July. 



SPONSOR, Volume 4. No. 14. 3 July 1950. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc.. at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore 11. Md. Executive, Editorial. Circulation Office 
510 Madison Ave., New York 22. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered a< second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postofflce under Act 8 March 1879. 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR R 



Curtis Publishing 
head looks at TV 



More d.j.'s at 
night this fall 

Out-of-home 

listening gets 

marketing assn. 

citation 



Kiddies big 

influence on 

adult viewing 



Radio set 
sales zooming 



Look for 

oleo air 

advertising 



Watch out if 

everyone "likes" 

your TV commercial 



MBS Fall business 
looks good 



Robert E. MacNeal, new president of Curtis Publishing, believes that 
TV will increase movement of goods ; help all media. Of magazines' fu- 
ture in a TV era he says: "I am sure that magazines will be a fairly- 
lively corpse for some time to come." 

-SR- 
D.j.'s are being fast scheduled into key nighttime hours in move to 
build low-cost, saleable evening time. 

-SR- 
Growing interest of researchers inout-of-home listening measurements 
emphasized by New York chapter American Marketing Association with 
meritorious service awards given to out-of-home research experts Dr. 
Sydney Roslow (Pulse) and Miss Claire R. Himmel (WNEW) . Dr. Roslow 
recently announced extension of out-of home listening measurements to 
10 key markets. NAB at April meeting passed resolution urging analy- 
sis of "big plus" audience. Multiple set listening within home is 
next to get definte attention by researchers. 

-SR- 
Marked influence of children on what's seen in TV homes, during adult 
viewing hours indicated in Ohio State U. study of Columbus area. Com- 
parison made between adult-only homes and adult-children homes shows 
how drastically youngsters alter ratings. Such adult-type shows as 
comedy drama, including westerns, reveal greatest appeal for child 
viewer. Variety shows like Milton Berle had almost even viewing bal- 
ance in adult-only and adult-children homes. Crime drama revealed 
wide variations depending on nature of presentation. SPONSOR plans 
full story on this subject. 

-SR- 
Although console radio set sales are lagging, 1950 demand for table 
and portable sets seems destined to push 1950 total substantially be- 
yond 1949. Trend due basically to demand for bed room, kitchen, den, 
and workroom sets within home ; to increasing out-of-home listening. 
Joseph B. Elliott, RCA vp, predicted recently that radio set sales 
1950-1955 would exceed 1935-1940 period. 

-SR- 
Strong users of air advertising for several years, margarine manufac- 
turers like Jelke and Nucoa are gearing for big push to housewives via 
radio and TV this summer and fall. Elimination of 10c per pound fed- 
eral tax 1 July affects only colored margarine. Some states are fol- 
lowing suit in reducing prices. At same time, butter interests are 
feverishly planning counter ad action. 

-SR- 
Watch out for a TV commercial that rates an overwhelming "like" score 
with little or no "dislike" votes ; it may mean a namby-pamby approach 
with too little sell to be effective. That's gist of observation by 
analysts in current Starch TV report. A commercial with strong likes 
and dislikes is more likely to do selling job, says Starch. 

-SR- 
Fall business prospects at Mutual are better than at any time during 
last two years, with virtually all MBS advertisers contracted through 
end of 1950. Fact that Mutual has no network TV operation (a drain on 
other webs) helps brighten fiscal picture. 



SPONSOR 



%\ 



MY KHI5PY KOOL LOTION 

PLEAS* ,LUICl/" 



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*V/^TMin= 


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E, 



ELECTRIC razors and tile baths — us 
North Dakota hayseeds sure live mighty 
fancy! And why not, when our income ex- 
ceeds the national average by $1750 per year? 

There's an easy way to get your share of this 
fabulous Red River Valley farm income. It's 
WDAY, Fargo. This 27-year-old NBC affiliate 
racks up some of the highest Hoopers in the 
land. For weekday Evenings (Dec. '49-Apr. 



'50), for example, WDAY got a 64.0% Share 
of Audience, compared to 15.1% for the next 
station! Equally important, WDAY has even 
greater listenership throughout the rural 
parts of the Red River Valley. A new 22- 
county survey (copy on request) proves that 
WDAY is a 17-to-l favorite over its nearest 
"competition !" 

Let us send you all the amazing facts about 
WDAY, today! 




FARGO, N. D. 




9 

NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 

FREE & PETERS, INC., Exclusive National Representatives 



3 JULY 1950 





Vol. 4 no. 14 



3 July 1950 




^FEATURES 



Sponsor Reports 

51© Madison 

Queries 

\<mi- anil Renew 

Mr. Sponsor: 
II . S. Brown 

P.S. 

Mr. Sponsor Asks 
Roundup 
Radio Results 
Sponsor Speaks 
Applause 



1 

6 

10 

11 

14 
16 
32 
34 
36 
56 
56 



Cover shows Tom Bartlett, MC of "Wel- 
come Travelers" (NBC), helping a young 
guest make a phone call. Telephone-gim- 
mick shows have what it takes (see p. 22). 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Frank M. Bannister, Irving 
Marder 

Assistant Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Arnold Al- 
port, Lila Lederman 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President — Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(West Coast Manager), Beatrice Turner, 
Edna Yergin, John Kovchok 

Vice-President — Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Promotion Manager: M. H. LeBlang 

Circulation Department: Ann Ostrow (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Victoria 
Woods 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 
INC. Executive. Editorial, Circulation, and Advertising 
Offices: 510 Madison Ave.. New York 22. N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 360 N. 
Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Financial 1556. WeBt 
Coast Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Los Angeles. 
Telephone: Hillside 8311. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ava., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United States 
18 a yaar, Canada and foreign $9. Single copies 50c. 
Printed In U. 8. A. Address all correspondence to 510 
Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. Copyright 1950 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



ARTICLES 



Soft drinks on the air 

With steadily rising costs and competition galore, the soft drink industry may 
soon blow its nickel top^and broadcast advertising will get a big share of 
the new money 



Nearly every station has one 

Direct contact of program with listeners always seems to pay off. The hun- 
dreds of telephone gimmick shows on the air are doing fine for the sponsor 



Minutes: new radio /TV measurement 

New Sindlinger report uses time as the yardstick for radio and television 
ratings. This makes listening-viewing comparable with other recreational 
activities like reading and going to the store 



lion* Borden's does it 

When Borden's dropped network radio for spot, other advertisers sat up and 
took notice. Now Borden's is busy slugging out the problems of making best 
local buys for its money 



Who looks where? 

Nobody has the full picture of television coverage. To get detailed data on 
where sets and signals go, sponsors will have to supply the push 



19 



22 



24 



26 



30 



in future: ISSUES 



Fall Facts Issue 



17 -fnli 



Presented for the first time in fast-reading question and answer style, SPONSOR'S annual Fall Fact) 
issue will cover the provocative trends advertisers and agencies must spot in 1950. Here's a rundowi 
of some of the topics covered: 

AIR POWER: proofs of sales effectiveness of radio/TV 

RADIO SPOT SECTION: spot boom; increase in participation type programs; early morning spoil 
sorship; best times available this fall; transcription and music library trends 

RADIO NETWORK SECTION: shift to daytime programing; time slots available this fall; program 
ing motifs of networks, morning, noon, and night; are networks declining?; will rates decrease? 

TV SECTION: large TV pullout map including all basic data; time slots available this fall; when t< 
go into TV; package programs available; trends in TV rates 

OVERALL: premium trends; are giveaways waning?; use of mail order; research trends 



it's easy. 



WHEN YOU 
KNOW HOW! 



I 



T takes more than a franchise and equipment to 
make a ball-team or a radio station — it takes Know- 
How. 

KWKH has unequalled radio Know-How in its tri- 
state market. . . a Hooper-proven Know-How born 
of 24 years' experience. 

For Mar. -Apr. '50, for example, Shreve- 
port Hoopers gave KWKH a 77.0% 
higher Share of Audience than the next 
station, weekday mornings — 55.2% 
higher in the afternoon — 83.4% higher 
at night! 

Also — BMB Study No. 2 proves that KWKH gets 
the biggest audience in the rich oil, timber and agri- 
cultural regions around Shreveport. KWKH's 
Weekly Daytime Audience shows an increase of 
more than 50,000 families since 1946 ... is now 
over 300,000 families! 

By every standard, KWKH is your best buy in our 
booming area. Ask us or The Branham Company 
for all the facts! 



50,000 Watts 



CBS 





KWKH 



Texas 



a 



SHREVEPORT f LOUISIANA 



The Branham Company Ark&flSftS 

Representatives 
Henry Clay, General Manager 





Sponsors love receiving letters — especially 
when they come at the rate of one every 
7.5 seconds! 

That's just what happened as a result of a 
certain show'" on CKAC during the week of 
May 13-19. In seven short days, this show 
pulled 78,718 replies, each containing proof 
of purchase. Mathematically speaking, this 
means one reply each and every 7.5 seconds, 
twenty-four hours a day, for the full seven 
day week ! 

Amazing : Not when you consider that 
CKAC takes you into +50,0(10 French radio 
homes — more than 70% of the total num- 
ber of radio homes in the Province. It's no 
wonder that CKAC gets results — at a very 
modest cost per listener. 

'CKAC's "CASINO". Present co-sponsors: 
Odex, Super Suds, Noxzema. Segments of 
"Casino" still available for sponsorship. 
Write for full details. 

CBS Outlet in Montreol 

Key Station of the 

A TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CEAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatt! 

Representatives: 

Adam J. Young Jr. - New York, Chicago 

William Wright - Toronto 



510 Madisan 



TV FILM STORY PLEASES 

May I applaud you for your excel- 
lent story in the current issue of SPON- 
SOR entitled "Sensational but scarce." 
It is a real step forward in clarifying 
the film situation for television. 

May I take this opportunity to cor- 
rect the erroneous impression which I 
believe the article gives that our firm 
has sold the Cisco Kid rights for tele- 
vision to NBC. Actually, our deal with 
the National Broadcasting Company 
involves the use of our Cisco Kid tele- 
vision films on their owned and oper- 
ated stations in New York, Cleveland, 
and Washington only. In all other 
markets we are taking individual con- 
tracts with sponsors and stations. 

John L. Sinn 

President 

Ziv Television Programs 
Incorporated 

New York 



BINDERS FOR SPONSOR COPIES 

WHO's copies of sponsor have been 
read, and distributed throughout the 
organization for re-reading and even- 
tually have been lost in the shuffle. 
Mr. Loyet recently expressed a desire 
to have a complete file of sponsor 
magazines for the past year, and to 
build a file of future copies. Can you 
supply back issues? 

Building a file of SPONSOR calls for 
a wire type binder in which to keep 
current issues prior to permanent bind- 
ing. Do you make such a binder es- 
pecially for SPONSOR? 

W. W. Woods 

Assistant Resident Manager 

WHO 

Des Moines 

• Binder holding a 6-months' supply of SPON- 
SOR are available at $4 each; two binders $7. 



RADIO RESULTS VALUABLE 

As a new station, only on the air 
since 1 December, 1949, we are pToud 
of the results we have been able to pro- 
duce for the Central Federal Savings 
and Loan Association of Wellsville, 
Ohio. From what we have been able 
to learn of the radio activity of such 
firms, use of an extensive spot sched- 
ule is unusual. 

Within a few weeks, I will be able 
to give you another report that will be 
extremely unusual in this same field. 
In that time we will be able to get 
some idea of the results another bank 
is getting from their sponsorship of 
major league baseball games! This 
particular account's activity has aT- 
rested the interest of the Banker's 
Monthly magazine. The most unusual 
part about this story is that the bank 
is located in a small town 20 miles 
from our 250-watt transmitter and 
serves largely a farmer market. We 
find that "Radio Results" is extremely 
valuable to us in passing on valuable 
program selling ideas. 

John W. Ridder 

Program Director 

WOHl 

East Liverpool. Ohio 



TV DICTIONARY FOR SPONSORS 

Will you please send us a copy of 
the issue of sponsor which has Part I 
of the TV dictionary. We have parts 
II and III. For some reason or other 
we do not have part I. Either we mis- 
laid our copy or did not receive one. 

John R. Gilman Jr. 

Assistant Advertising Manager 

John H. Brock Inc. 

Springfield, Mass. 



NABS MILLER COMMENTS 

I have found some very constructive, 
affirmative articles in the current num- 
ber of sponsor concerning NAB and I 
am writing to let you know that I 
appreciate them very much. I am sure 
they will be mutually helpful. 

Justin Miller 
President 
NAB 
Washington 



Mr. Stuart Watson received one of 
your pamphlets, "TV dictionary for 
sponsors." Everyone in our advertising 
department has found the TV diction- 
ary both interesting and entertaining, 
and Mr. Watson has asked me to write 
to you to see if it might not be possible 
for you to send him two more copies. 

Dorothy E. Feno 

Secretary to Mr. Stuart Watson 

Assistant Manager Adv. Dept. 

Standard Oil Company (Indiana) 

Chicago 

We w T ould like to take advantage of 
(Please turn to page 52) 



SPONSOR 



NEW YORK 





S. B 

BEESON 



W . B . K . G . -^ j~ 

(-ABER -»«*■ DARE 

, N DUNN ™™ 5ULL I VAN 

*~ 

JP"^'' BRESLIN 



F . W . 
Ml LLER. JR . 





'mtm 



Mi M 

W . E . • H . K . 

SHREWSBURY Z POSTER 



% m "m b . h . A^gr^ 

«-. K E I T 3^ 

i- N H . L . 





These are the men who, with years ot 
experience and willingness, are ready 
at all times to give you the 

maximum of efficiency in service. 
All are well seasoned in the 
field, all are capable. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CHICAGO 





H . V. 
BARRETT 



HEADLEY-REED TV 



HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



3 JULY 1950 



WHAT'S THE INSIDE STORY? 




,. 




Everybody knows the big story. Any way you 
say it— audience, cost or results — 50,000- 
watt kmox is by far the best advertising buy 
in 73-county Mid-America. 

Now Pulse reveals the inside story ! 

IN METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS (4-COUNTY 
HEART OF MID-AMERICA), KMOX DELIVERS 
A BIGGER AUDIENCE THAN ANY OTHER STA- 
TION/ AT A LOWER COST- PER -THOUSAND. 

It's one inside story you can shout about. Day- 
time, you get almost twice as many listeners 
per, average quarter-hour ... at a 13% lower 
cost-per-thousand ! Nighttime, you get a 65% 
larger audience. . .at a 30% lower cost, only 
$1.55 per thousand! 

And anytime, all of kmox's listeners in the 
other 69 counties are a whopping bonus ! 

You can say that again. Inside St. Louis— as 
well as outside— kmox gives you more lis- 
teners at less cost than any other station ! 



*BMB 50-100% daytime listening area, 1949; 66 counties nighttime. 

■\The Pulse of St. Louis. March-April 1950, Monday through Friday 
ratings for St. Louis City and these counties: St. Charles. St. Louis, 
Madison and St. Clair. 

The Voice of St. Louis -50,000 watts KMOX 
Columbia Owned 'Represented by Radio Sales 



Queries 



This new feature will present some of the most inter- 
esting questions asked of SPONSOR'S Research Dept. 
Readers are invited to call or write for information. 
Address: 510 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 




YOU CAN'T DRIVE 
A SPIKE WITH A 
TACK HAMMER... 

You must have sufficient coverage of 
the market to assure adequate cover- 
age of the community . . . KATL's 5000 
WATTS will assure YOU complete 
coverage of the entire Houston market 
area. 




YOU PON T NEED A 10 
TON TRUCK TO DELIVER 

YOUR MESSAGE... 

CHECK THESE POINTS ON "CATTLE " COVERAGE: 



Radio Families 
Annual Income 
Retail Sales 



393,400 

$ 1,873,393,000 

$ 1,287,086,000 



Nat Rep. 
Independent Metropolitan Sales 
King H- Robinson, General Mgr. 



*%*«4C<m& 0(4e*t *?Hdefie*tdettt 




HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Q. Who is the agency for Hopalong Cassidy, for licensing rights to 
produce merchandise under his name? Stationery manufacturer 

A. Contact William Boyd, Hopalong Cassidy Enterprises, Beverly 
Hills, California. 

Q. How many advertisers use television? Boston broadcaster 

A. N. C. Rorabough Company reports that some 2,842 advertisers 
were investing in television in March, compared with 2,398 in 
February — an increase of 18.5%. 

Q. What radio programs are sponsored over NBC by General Mills? 

Midwestern advertising agency 

A. NBC's report for June lists: Live Like A Millionaire (General 

Mills Products) ; Night Beat (Wheaties) ; The Penny Singleton 

Story (Wheaties); Dangerous Assignment (Wheaties); Sara's 

Private Caper (Wheaties). 

Q. Can you give us some comparison between the number of TV set 
owners and radio set owners? Baltimore advertiser 

A. According to the Broadcast Measurement Bureau, at the start of 
this year there were 40,700,000 radio families in the United 
States, and 4,343,000 TV families. 

Q. In what issue have you had an article called "Is Hooper short- 
changing radio?" Advertisers' association 

A. 22 May 1950, p. 30. 

Q. Do you have data on the Negro market? Small advertising agency 

A. See sponsor issues: 10 October 1949, "The Forgotten 15,000,- 
000"; 29 August 1949, page 28; 12 September 1949, page 36. 

Q. Can SPONSOR tell me anything about the impact of television 
as a selling medium? Sales consultant 

A. sponsor's 199 TV Results gives you concrete facts which are 
verified by the sponsors. (The booklet is still available, free to 
sponsor subscribers, otherwise $1.00. Bulk rates on request.) 

Q. We have something coming up this summer in which NBC-TV 
might be interested, can you tell us to whom to submit it? 

Veterans' association 

A. Send it to Special Events, NBC, Mr. Robert W. Friedheim. 

Q. Do you have any information concerning the grocers' use of 
radio in comparison to other media? Trade association 

A. See sponsor's recent publication Radio Is Getting Bigger. In the 
article "More power," statistical information is given specifically 
concerning grocers. (This booklet is still available on the same 
basis as 199 TV Results mentioned above.) 

Q. Earlier this year you had a story on transit radio. Can you give 
us an idea how it stands now? Large advertiser 

A. sponsor had a "p. s." on transit radio in its 5 June issue. At that 
time the system had been stretched to 23 cities with 3,300 vehicles 
equipped for transit radio. Advertisers had gone from 25 to 45 
since 1 January, an increase of 80%. Local advertisers were re- 
ported as numbering 344. 



10 



SPONSOR 



New and r 



3 July 1950 




These reports appear in alternate issues 



New on Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


NET 


STA 


TIOI 


American Oil Co 


Joseph K .11 1 Co 




CBS 


73 


Carnation Co 


Erwin, Wasey Co 




CBS 


95 


Coca-Cola Co 


D'Arcy 




fiBS 


74 


Quaker Oats Co 


Sherman & Marquette 




MBS 


400 


Richfield OU Corp 


Hixson & Jorgensen 




NBC 


16 


William Wrigley Co 


Arthur Mcycrhoff 




CBS 


170 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Edward B. Murrow; M-F 7:45-8 pm; 3 Jul; 52 wka 

Family Party; Sat 10-10:30 am; 1 Jul; 52 wks 

Unnamed; Sat 10:30-11 pm ; 7 Oct; 39 wks 

The Challenge of the Yukon ; M, W, F 5:30-6 pm; 11 Sep; 52 wk< 

Hi. I,h .1.1 Reporter; Sun-F 1-1:15 am <Pac); 25 Jun; 52 wks 

Twenty-four different programs; various limes; 11 Jun lo 4 Aug 



Renewals on Networks 



SPONSOR 

Campbell Soup Co 
General Foods Corp 

General Mills Inc 



General Mills 
The Kellogg Co 
P. Lorillard Co 
Noxzema Chemical 
Procter & Gamble Co 



Quaker Oaks Co 

Ronson Art Metal Works 

THmont Clothing Co 



AGENCY NET STATIONS 



Ward Wheelock 


CBS 


156 


Young & H.il. i. ... . 


NBC 


151 




NBC 


161 


Tat ham-Laird 


ABC 


253 


Dancer-Fit zger aid-Sample 


ABC 


194 


Tat ham-Laird 


ABC 


23 


Knox Reeves 


NBC 


72 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 


MBS 


400 


Ccyer. Newell & Ganger 


ABC 


56 


SSC&B 


MBS 


125 


Conipton 


CBS 


83 


Dancer-Fit zgerald-Sample 


CBS 


85 


Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 


CBS 


86 


Biow 


CBS 


149 




MBS 


509 


Sherman & Marquette 


MBS 




Grey 


MBS 


498 


William H. Weintrauh 


ABC 


196 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Club 15; M-F 7:30-45 pm ; 3 Jul; 52 wks 

The Aldrieh Family; Th 8-8:30 pm ; 29 Jun; 52 wks 

Father Knows Best; Th 8:30-9 pm ; 29 Jun; 52 wks 

Breakfast Club; M-F 9-9:15 am; 29 May; 52 wks 

Betty Crocker Magazine of the Air; M-F 10:25-45 am; 1 Jun; 52 wks 

Today in Hollywood (Pac Coast only); 1 Jun; 52 wks 

Live Like A Millionaire; M-F 2:30-3 pm ; 1 Jun; 52 wks 

Mark Trail; M,W,F 5-5:30 pm ; 2 Oct; 13 wks 

Dr. I. <.».: 30 Aug; 52 wks 

Gabriel Heatter; M 7:30-45 pm ; 26 Jun; 52 wks 

Lowell Thomas; M-F 6:45-7 pm ; 3 Jul; 52 wks 

Beulah; M-F 7-7:15 pm; 3 Jul; 52 wks 

Jack Smith; M-F 7:15-30 pm; 3 Jul; 52 wks 

The FBI in Peace and War; Th 8-8:30 pin ; 6 Jul: 52 wks 

Roy Rogers Show; Sun 6-6:30 pm ; 6 Aug; 52 wks 

A Man On The Farm; Sat 12-1 pm ; 2 Sep; 13 wks 

Twenty Questions; Sat 8-8:30 pm ; 1 Jul: 52 wks 

Stop The Music; Sun 8:15-30 pm; 3 Sep; 52 wks 



National Broadcast Sales Executives 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Marion Annenberg 
Edward R. Capral 
Robert DeSousa 
Sam Elber 
Norman Evans 
Jack D. Funk 
Eleanor Glogau 
Ruddick C. Lawrence 
Dewey H. Long 
Warren Mid diet on 

Harold L. Morgan Jr 
Donald A. Norman 
Kent Paterson 
Chester Randolph 
Leonard Reeg 
Willard Schroeder 



Alexander Stronacb 
G. Richard Swift 
Ralph Tuchman 
Clarence Worden 



Jr 



MBS, N. Y. 

WCON, Atlanta 

KNBH, Hlywd., tv sis 

AM, a daily magazine of business news, exec news ed 

WFMD, Frederick, Md., chief announcer 

KXOX, Sweetwater, Texas, prog dir 

MBS. N. Y., publicity dept 

Fortune Magazine, N. Y., assoc adv mgr 

Frederic W. Ziv Co, N. Y., sis 

KMOX, St. L., sis prom dir 

ABC, N. Y., tv bus mgr 

WNBC-WNBT, N. Y„ sis dir 

WOR, N. Y., sis staff 

KGLO, Mason City, la., farm svc dir 

ABC, N. Y., eastern prog mgr (AM) 

Ketchum. MacLeod & Grove, Pittsb., radio, tv dir 

ABC, N. Y., mgr of tv prog 

WCBS, N. Y., gen mgr 

KTTV. Hlywd., sls-svc coordinator 

WCBS, N. Y., dir of spec features and pub svc 



prog 



WDSU-TV, WDSU, New Orleans, prom d 

WATL, Atlanta, prog dir 

Same, acct exec 

WIP, I'd ill , dir of prom and pub 

Same, prog dir 

KCHI. Chillicothe, Mo., com ml mgr. 

DuMont tv net, N. Y., publicity dept 

NBC-TV, N. Y., mgr of sis dev 

WABB, Mobile, gen mgr 

WLS, Chicago, heads staff under sis mgr in creation 

sis material 
Same, natl dir of tv prog operations 
KNBH, Hlywd., sis mgr 
WCBS, N. Y., acct exec 
WLS, ' lii asst farm dir 
Same, natl dir of AM prog 

Grandwood Broadcasting Co (WOOD), Grand Rapid-, gen 
WINS, N. Y., research 
Same, natl dir of tv prog 
Same, also gen mgr WCBS-TV 
Same, asst to gen mgr 
WCBS-TV, N. Y., asst to gen mgr 



1 p.od 



mgr, sec 



In next issue: New National Spot Business; Veu? and Renew on Television; 

Station Representation Changes; Adi'ertising Ayeney Personnel Changes 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



JVeu? and Renew 3 July 1950 



NAME 



James Calvin Affieck 

Robert H. Bennett 

I mil G. Best 
James P. Delafield 

George H. Fiteh 
T. C. Fogarty 
Gene Fowler 
Eric Hartell 
William C. Jordan 
Dwight McAnally 
Frank Price 
Rol Rider 
John P. Robertson 
Roland F. Roche 
Lou Scott 

John E. Sloane 

Richard Spater 

William B. Tower Jr 

Richard B. Wilder 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

Radiomarine Corp of America (RCA subsidiary) 

adv and sis prom mgr 
General Foods Corp (Maxwell House div), V Y 

adv mgr 
Thor Corp, Chi., sis prom mgr 
General Foods Corp (Maxwell House div), IV. Y, 

sis, adv mgr 
Devoe & Raynolds, V Y., mgr of company store - 
Continental Can Co, N. V., sis vp 
Alfred Colle Co, M'npls., acct exec 
Zonite Products Corp, N. Y., gen adv mgr 
Sales Management Magazine, N. Y., adv prod mgr 
Sears, Roebuck (Galveston store), adv mgr 



NEW AFFILIATION 



N. Y., 
., sis, 

, asst 
ystcm 



N. W. Ayer, Hwood office 

Trans World Airline, Kansas City, Mo. 

Coca-Cola Co, N. Y., mgr of natl youth market 



Thomas A. Edison Inc, We si Orange, mgr of spec adv 

and pub 
Trans-World Airline, Kansas City, Mo. (city sis mgr, 

Zurich, Switzerland) 
Illinois Watch Case * • (Elgin American div), Chi., sis 

mgr 
Young & Ruhicam, N. Y. 



Allen B. DuMont Labs, N. Y., sis prom mgr, receiver sis div 

Same, asst gen mgr of Maxwell House div 

Same, adv mgr 

Same, sis, adv mgr of Maxwell House div 

Same, adv mgr 

Same, exec vp metal div 

Archer-Daniels-Midland Co, M'npls., adv mgr 

Same, adv vp 

Bristol Laboratories Inc, Syracuse, asst to adv and sis prom mgr 

Dearborn Stove Co, Dallas, asst adv mgr 

Thomas A. Edison Inc, West Orange, asst to adv dir 

Carnation Co, L. A., asst adv mgr for Friskies Dog Food 

Same, city sis mgr < Zurich, Sv, itzerland) 

Pepsi-Cola Metropolitan Bottling Co, N. Y., vp in charge of adv 

Thomas A. Edison Inc, West Orange, sis prom mgr for Edison 

Voicewriter 
Same, adv dir 

Same, city sis mgr (Rome) 

New Haven Clock & Watch Co, New Haven, sis dir 

Jasco Aluminum Products Corp, West bury, L. I., adv mgr 



New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 

American Molasses Go, N. Y. 

Astrow Corp, East Newark, N. J. 

Aron Canning Co, Stockton, Calif. 

B.Y.'s of California, L. A. 

A. & G. J. Caldwell Inc, Newburyport, Mail. 

Hal Collins Co, Dallas 

Delham Food Products Co, Cambridge 

Del-Mar Services Inc, Chi. 

Grace Downs Hollywood Model School, N. Y. 

East Coast Packing Co, Boston 

Economy Gas Furnace Mfg Co, Chi. 

Fletcher Products Inc, L. A. 

Foell Packing Co, Chi. 

Great Kills (Staten Island) Board of Commerce and 

the Great Kills Boatmen's Association, N. Y. 
Griffith-Durney Co, Beverly Hills 

Havatampa Cigar Co, Tampa 

Henry, Leonard & Thomas Inc, N. Y. 

John Henschel & Co, N. Y. 

Herock Mfg Co, Phoenixville, Pa. 

Kormon Water Co, Fall River, Mass. 

Mandel Mfg Co, St. L. 

Marion Electrical Instrument Co, Manchester, IN. H. 

Market Forge Co, Everett, Mass. 

Mayfair Mfg Co, Bklyn. 

Melrose Cedar Point Inc, Sandusky, O. 

Midland Manufacturing Products, Detroit 

The New England Bakery, Providence 

Pacific. Vinegar Co, Richmond, Calif. 

Patterson-Kelly Co Inc, East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Penn Metal Corp, Phila. 

Plaza Studios, N. Y. 

The Adam Scheldt Brewing Co, Norristown, Pa. 

School of Modern Photography, N. Y. 

\ S.hrader's Son, N. Y. (div of ScovlH Mfg Co.) 

Screw Research Association, Providence 

Scibel & Stern, N. Y. 

Seneca Textile, N. Y. (div of United Merchants & 
Manufacturers) 

Shellenherger's Inf. Phila. 

Shifniun Brothers, Newark 

Toy Manufacturers of the U. S. A., N. Y. 

John Wanamaker, Phila. 

War. I * Ward, Phila. 

Wisteria Hosiery Mills, Gastonla, N .C. 

WNEW, N. Y. 

The Woburn Chemical Corp. Kearny, N. J. 



PRODUCT (or service) 

Grandma's molasses 

Filter manufacturer 

Corina tomato paste 

Skin lotion 

Light rum 

Hair tonic 

Food manufacturer 

"Aqua-Mite** Biter 

School for models 

Chicken croquettes 

Gas furnace manufacturer 

Mouth wash 

Rose brand canned meat 

Board of commerce & boatmen's association 

Alaska pink salmon 

Cigars 

Cigarette holders 

Drawing materials 

Paint products 

Water bleach 

Junior sportswear 

Electric meters 

Materials handling division 

Photographic equipment 

Resort 

Novelties 

Harvest bread 

Maynor*s wine vinegar 

Heat transfer equipment manufacturer 

Steel storage equipment 

Blouses 

Beer and ale 

Photography school 

Automotive tire valves 

Head screws 

Dress manufacturer 

Textiles 

Confectionery stores 
Bedding 
Association 
Department store 
Men's store chain 
Hosiery mills 
Radio station 
Chemical manufacturer 



AGENCY 

Charles W. Hoyt Co, N. Y. 

Hart Lehman, N. Y. 

Botsford, Constant ine & Gardner, S. F. 

Steller, Millar & Lester, L. A. 

Badger & Browning & Parcher, Boston 

Gandy-Owcns, Dallas 

Meissner & Culver Inc, N. Y, 

MacDonald Cook Co, Chi. 

William Wilbur, N. Y. 

Chambers & Wis well Inc, Boston 

Morris F. Swaney Inc. Chi. 

Hobson, L. A. 

Gordon Best Co, Chi. 

William Warren, Jackson & Delaney, IV. Y, 

Mogge-Privctt Inc, L. A. 

Henry Quednau, Tampa 

William G. Seidenbaum & Co, N. Y. 

Rose-Martin Inc a N. Y. 

Rolley & Reynolds, Phila. 

A. J. K. .nil - Co, FaU River 

Douglas D. Simon, V Y. 

Meissner & Culver Inc, Boston 

Cory Snow, Inc., Boston 

George M. Kahn Co, N. Y. 

Koehl, Landis & Landen Inc, N. Y. 

Den man & Rettcridge, Detroit 

Horton-Noyes, Providence 

Ralph G. Cain, S. F. 

O. S. Tyson & Co, Inc, N. Y. 

Raymond A. Sholl & Co, Phila. 

Yates, Wertheim & Rabcock, N. Y. 

Ward Wheelock Co, Phila. 

Grey, N. Y. 

G. M. Basford Co, N. Y. 

James Thomas Chirurg, Boston 

J. Gerald Brown, N. Y. 

Federal, N. Y. 

Aitkln-Kynctt Co, N. Y. 
Max Walter, N. Y. 
Grey, N. Y. 

Douglas D. Simon, N. Y. 
Weight man, Phila. 
Fdwards, Hackensaek, N. J. 
The> Arnold Cohan Corp, N. Y. 
Victor A. Bennett Co, N. Y. 





The Greeks had a stage for it . . • 

Back in the days of the tunic and laurel wreath, the 
Greeks started the "arena" theatre — with no stage 
settings or properties — but with sharp accent on story 
and characters. Today, in New York, in Dallas, in 
Seattle, throughout the country, the "arena" theatre 
technique is revolutionizing the legitimate stage. 

In television, the arena theatre has the important 
asset of economy. 

NBC's CAMEO THEATRE brings the same swift 
power and dramatic impact to the living rooms 
of millions of viewers without the need of expensive 
scenery and properties . . . yet with a sharpness 
and intimacy that prompted Billboard to say of 
Arthur Miller's premiere script: "Gripping, beautifully 
produced stanza ... a smash artistic success." 

Available for immediate sponsorship on NBC, the 
CAMEO THEATRE combines prestige and moss 
appeal in a degree rarelv found in television. 



NBC Television 

A service of Radio Corporation of America 




important 

in yOjo* 
selling 

WDEL-TV 



CHANNEL 7 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 



Assures advertisers the clearest 
picture in this rich, important 
market. NBC network shows, fine 
local programming — provide an 
established and growing audi- 
ence. Many advertisers /N j^ 
are now enjoying profit- 
able returns. 






WGAL-TV 



CHANNEL 4 

LANCASTER, PENNA. 










The only television sta- 
tion that reaches this 
large, important Penn- 
sylvania market. Local program- 
ming — top shows from four net- 
works: NBC, CBS, ABC and 
DuMont guarantee advertisers 
a loyal, responsive audience. 
STEINMAN STATIONS 
Clair R. McCollough, 

General Manager 
Represented by 

ROBERT MEEKER 

ASSOCIATES 

New York Chicago 

San Francisco Los Angeles 





31 r. Sponsor 



W. S. Brown 

Vice president & advertising manager 
Canada Dry Ginger Ale, Inc., N. Y. 



Fortunately for Canada Dry. William Brown, its vice president 
in charge of advertising, is inclined to think out loud . . . often and 
rapidly. Small ideas grow quickly to large significant ones as he 
thinks them out verbally. His latest, the "television snack" theme, re- 
cently became part of one of Canada Dry's greatest promotional pro- 
grams; it's a basic sales theme that associates beverages with related 
snack-eating, will be used on TV and at point-of-sale. 

There's no magic to good advertising," says Brown (his confident 
manner reminds you of the proverbial dynamite that comes in small 
packages), "and it's hardly a matter of being strictly scientific." 
With a background in accounting (NYU, 1927), 47-year-old Brown 
has had 25 years' experience with Canada Dry, 20 years in the ad- 
vertising department. A practical man, unhindered by complex 
theory. Brown believes that a good advertising man must first be 
a "damn good administrator." 

Canada Dry, and Brown, are famous for "firsts." The company 
was first to sponsor the Jack Benny show. Information Please, and 
the Meredith Wilson regular-season show on radio. Canada Dry's 
latest first: sponsorship of the initial network TV program by a soft 
drink manufacturer, Super Circus on ABC. The show costs the com- 
pany about $7,000 per week. It was first telecast over 10 stations 
in April 1949; today, it's in 30 cities. 

Extensive advertising campaigns by Canada Dry suggests huge 
advertising expenses. Actually, the budget is not high. Brown will 
work with about $3,000,000 for 1950: $1,600,000 allotted to com- 
pany-owned plants; about $800,000 to home office advertising; about 
$600,000 to advertising for licensees. With its local bottlers, the 
company will spend about .$110,000 on local radio for 1950. An 
average of 750 announcements per week have been aired for the 
past three years. Over $350,000 will be spent for TV this year. 

Brown's outstanding advertising job has not been in vain. Net 
sales for 1949 were $1,300,000 more than for 1948 (based on their 
fiscal year) : $51,400,000 for 1949; $50,100,000 for 1948. For the 
six months ending 31 March 1950. net sales amounted to $25,176,728 
with a net income of $912,663; in the like period for 1949 sales were 
$24,320,380 with a net income of $867,956. (For other information 
on soft think advertising, see page 19.) 



14 



SPONSOR 



Boston still speaks for itself 




Boston is Boston. . .and there's no place 
quite like it. Remember the old story of 
Priscilla and John Alden and Miles Stan- 
dish? It's the same today. Boston still 
makes up its own mind. And goes its own 
way. In radio, too. 

Thai's illustrated by WEEI's full- 
hour daytime program, "Beantown Vari- 
eties." This WEEI local live talent show 
competes with one oi the most popular 
''other network" daytime programs in 
the country. Yet in every quarter-hour 
"Beantown Varieties"* attracts a 
bigger audience than any other 
Boston station. Delivers a Pulse 
rating of 5.2!* 
"Beantown Varieties" is on WEEI he. 
cause WEEI knows what Boston likes. 
No wonder WEEI has the largest share 
of audience, the highest average ratings 
and more quarter-hour wins than all 
other Boston stations combined* And 
today U EEVs much bigger audiences 
are giving sponsors more for their money 
than ever before, f^lfc. *w' se a' Bi 

' /. ^». Mai. -Apr. (950 



the station is 



MM mmtt 



Columbia's Friendly Voice in Boston 





Cable Address: 

CHARLOTTE, N.C. 




With Charlotte activation of the 
co-axial cable definitely assured 
for September, WBTV becomes 
the cable address of almost 20,000 
Carolina television families — and 
their additional thousands of 
friends and neighbors. 

Oldest, and by 10 times the most 
powerful, telestation in the Caro- 
linas, WBTV beams the choice 
programs of 4 networks to 59 
counties, including 9 principal 
cities and a population of over 
3,000,000. 

Greatly increased set sales and 
intensified viewer interest in 
WBTV assure a responsive audi- 
ence for your television advertising 
in the cable-conscious Carolinas. 



WBTV 

CHARLOTTE, N.C. 

Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 
Represented Nationally by Radio Sales 



V«*ir developments on SPONSOR stories 



|>.S. 



See; Summer selling issue 

IsSUe: 8 May 1950 

Subject! Summer sales 

Plans, promotions and ideas, new ones and old, continue to stim- 
ulate 1950 summer selling. Results so far are good. 

National representatives, both radio and TV, point to unprece- 
dented summer billings which show no signs of slacking off. 

TV stations, particularly NBC outlets, are sold practically solid. 

Discount plan of WLW-T, Cincinnati, described by sponsor (8 May 
1950), is paying off, according to the station. The month of May 
showed an all-time high for the video outlet with 182 advertisers; a 
23% increase over the total number of advertisers buying time during 
April, and 109% over the same period last year. Participation spon- 
sorship showed the greatest increase in May as compared to April, 
76 to 53; spot announcements were 43 compared to 33; sponsored 
programs, 63 compared to 62. 

ABC reports there is every indication that the summer will see no 
unusual recession of spot sales from an upward trend. (Spot sales 
on its five owned and operated stations have registered a 27% in- 
crease in the first five months of 1950 over a comparable period 
last year.) New advertisers are entering the field in numbers equal 
to those taking the summer off. Says M. B. Grabhorn, vice president 
in charge of owned and operated stations, ". . . the continuing ex- 
pansion of the television audience with set manufacturers and sales 
reaching new highs indicate that the summer months will find spot 
advertisers making use of the medium as heavily as during the rest 
of the year." 

The TV network situation for the summer looks much better than 
ever before. It is reported that about 35 network programs will vaca- 
tion during the summer; but 46 will not. The vacationing sponsors 
plan little in the way of summer replacements. The line-up has been 
reported as follows: ABC retaining 11 advertisers, four vacationing; 
CBS retaining 14, 17 vacationing; NBC split, 16 and 16. DuMont 
indicates no sponsor taking off for the summer. NBC has in effect a 
35% discount to discourage advertisers from taking the summer 
vacation. 

Stations generally feel that their early success forecasts a summer 
selling job well done. WPEN. Philadelphia, for example, added dur- 
ing the latter part of May and the first of June over eight program 
sponsors, with several new and renewed sponsors in their spot an- 
nouncement and newscast departments. Typical of the 1950 summer 
selling impetus is that reported by WTAG. Worcester: "The Carlton 
Woolen Mills in Rochdale, Mass., is one of several WTAG advertisers 
seeing the light about not giving up advertising because it's summer. 



p.s 



See: "How to 'sell' a candidate" 

Issue: 22 May 1950, p. 38 

Subject: Political campaigns on the air 



With studios and recording 



equipment now set up in the Con- 
gressional office buildings, Congressmen are taking advantage of 
leasing the equipment at low cost. It costs them about $3.50 a disk 
to make radio transcriptions to send back to their local stations, 
which can be used on free time. It is estimated that from 800 to 900 
of these recordings are made each week, and it is not unusual for a 
member to send them to 40 or 50 stations; one member as high as 
72 stations. 

Members of Congress are expected to hit the air waves hard in 
view of these available facilities; about half are using the radio 
regularly now. 



16 



SPONSOR 




STABIL 




j " 



n0 



Oft 







WWJ-TV is taking circulation for granted! The 
number of television sets in the Detroit market 
has passed the quarter-million mark! 



ft* 



n0 



Oft 



• • 



Words like "experimental* . . . "test" . . . "pioneer- 
ing" . . . "infancy" and the rest of the vocabulary 
of a neiv medium are out. TV has come of age! 



ft** 



n0 



Oft 



• 09 



We ivill back our belief in the stability of tele- 
vision uith our neiv rate card (#R) which will 
be guaranteed to advertisers for one full year! 



RATES 

GUARANTEED 

FOR 1 
YEAR 



FIRST IN MICHIGAN 



Owned and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS 



National K*pre$entativet: THE GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 
ASSOCIATE AM-FM STATION WWJ 



WW ij 



NBC Television Network 



3 JULY 1950 



17 




RADIO AND T 





ON STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



NEW YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO 



TROIT • SAN FRANCISCO 



ATLANTA • HOLLYWOOD 








mt 



TEENY 

TWIST 

IPRETZEIS 



-*m 



"A 




\ Pt AN" 



i Sunshine. 



» oaiiw CHtue c- 



TELEVISION 

RARTy 
SUGGESTIONS 



Peanut Butter Pretzels 

Beverages Potato Chips 

Toasted Nuts Candy 

Cookies Pop Corn 

Cheese Spreads Crackers 



CANADA DRY 



TEENY 

TWIST 

IPRETZELSI 



/ cut*l 

: S0D6J 




1 TEENY 
TWIST 


- - i 


k 1» 


■gig; 


TEENY 
TWIST 


B£g 


■*' i 


3-4 -» - j 
— 


^BH- 



IN \ 



CANADA 1 
DRY 



I 



Ranters i 

PEANUTS \ 



iiz-r 









,•«■»*. * 



■ i i 



TREND IN SOFT DRINKS INDUSTRY. CANADA DRY IS TRYING TO HITCH SODA AND SNACK PARTIES TO TELEVICION VIEWING 



Soft drinks on the air 



There's no love lost 



in the niekel drink field, and competition galore 



over-all 



There's nothing soft about 
the soft drinks industry. 
High costs (they're still rising I and 
the fight to break the traditional five- 
cent price have drawn the bottlers 
in a line as hard as the bottles their 
drinks come in. Ad budgets have felt 
the pinch. 

Though soft drink sales have risen 
steadily in recent years, profits and 
advertising budgets in general have 
not. About $75,000,000 was spent for 
advertising in 1948 bv the soft drink 



companies; the figures have increased 
oidy slightly since then. 

But there are signs that the bottling 
industry is about to blow its five-cent 
top. Already. Canada Dry has added 
a penny to the price of small bottles 
in many markets. And, on a regional 
basis, Grapette. Dads Root Beer, Nes- 
bitt's Orange and other beverages have 
begun to increase prices. On the 
West Coast, 10 cents may soon be the 
prevailing price for the traditional 
"nickel bottle'' of pop. 



Trice increases are the key to in- 
creased air advertising. Until sales 
win a respectable margin of profit, 
most beverage manufacturers aren't 
going to expand advertising budgets 
to get more sales. When the break 
docs come, television will get a big 
share of the new money. The soft 
drink people aren't forgetting what 
radio has done for them; but they're 
intrigued by the opportunity to show 
their product and its trademark over 
the air to large audiences. 



3 JULY 1950 



19 




ANYWHERE IN U. S., COCA-COLA'S ON TAP. THAT'S WHY COMPANY USES NETWORK RADIO EXTENSIVELY TO KEEP SALES UP 



One of the first companies to raise 
its prices, Canada Dry is also the first 
soft drink manufacturer with a net- 
work TV show, Super Circus on ABC. 
On the other hand, Coca-Cola, which 
has been hewing to the five-cent line, 
has TV program plans as well. One 




Spot radio helps sell ex-Champ's pop in South 



possibility : a Charlie McCarthy show- 
on TV. Coca-Cola can make expan- 
sion plans without raising its price 
because of its tremendous sales volume 
(about $150,000,000 annually). 

To understand advertising strategy 
in the soft drinks industry, you have 
to know the business itself. It's a com- 
plex structure made up of "parts 'and 
parts of parts," as one bottler put it. 
Most ad budgets, consequently, are 
broken down on a national, regional, 
and sub-regional basis. 

There are more than 6,662 bottlers 
of carbonated beverages in the United 
States. They break down into two 
distinct groups: independent bottlers 
who manufacture beverages from 
standard extracts and concentrates; 
and franchise bottlers who prepare 
beverages from a concentrate fur- 
nished them by a parent company 
owning exclusive rights to some secret 
formula and a national trademark 
name. The Pepsi-Cola, Coca-Cola, and 
Sc\cii-Up companies are typical <>l 
those which give bottling franchises 
lo local companies. 

Though not more than half the bot- 
tlers are franchise companies, they do 
about 80% of the total business. Most 
parent companies allot advertising 



money for use localK b\ the francise 
organizations. Spot radio gets a big 
slice of the local money, though no 
accurate estimate of how much is pos- 
sible because bottlers are so scattered. 

The Broadcast Advertising Bureau 
of NAB, recently prepared an exten- 
sive roundup of information about the 
soft drink industry. BAB found that 
retail sales in the industry totalled 
over $1,250,000,000 in 1949. During 
the past 10 years, there's been a huge 
boost in consumption. In 1939. 482.- 
995,576 cases (an average of 24 bot- 
tles to a case) went down the throats 
of consumers. Wholesale value of all 
this pop was $361,690,917. In 1949, 
the total was up to 1.030.061.000 cases 
valued at $836,648,400. 

But. in this period, costs rose as 
well. From the prewar price of around 
four cents a pound, sujzar jumped l<> 
between seven and one half and eight 
cents. Bottles cost 40% more; bottle 
tops 30% more; labor costs have dou- 
bled since 1939. 

It's no wonder bottlers feel they 
have to make the buffalo on the nickel 
scream in order to keep the tradi- 
tional five-cent price. But Coca-Cola, 
giant in the field, shows no inclina- 
lion to up its prices. 



20 



SPONSOR 




Morton Downey puts listeners in Coca-Cola mood thrice weekly on NBC Super Circus is first network TV show sponored by a soft drink firm 



Some facts about Coca-Cola's posi- 
tion in the trade show why; and also 
indicate what's behind Coca-Cola ad- 
vertising strategy. 

Coca-Cola placed first in a 1949 
Scripps-Howard product distribution 
survey among nearly 200 types and 
brands of products studied. Four mar- 
kets showed Coca-Cola represented in 
100% of the retail outlets checked. 
Coke dropped below 93% distribution 
in only one of the markets checked. 
Pepsi-Cola and Royal Crown ran Coke 
a poor second; neither were repre- 
sented 100% in any one market. Can- 
ada Dry Ginger Ale and Seven-Up had 
complete distribution in the markets 
covered, generally falling below the 
colas within each market. 

Not only within the cola field, but 
among all carbonated beverages, Coca- 
Cola is by far the favorite soft drink 
on the market. Pepsi-Cola has been 
the only serious contender for the title, 
but it still doesn't approach Coke's an- 
nual sales. 

Coca-Cola may well be the heaviest 
advertised single product in America. 
And, of the $13,000,000 to $15,000,- 
000 spent for advertising this year, 
about $3,000,000 will be devoted to 
radio. The total budget is about the 



same as for last year. Coca-Cola shares 
cost of advertising with its 1,056 bot- 
tlers all over the country. 

Armed with top distribution (inter- 
nationally as well as nationally), a 
strong financial structure, and the high 
spot in popularity, Coca-Cola finds it 
realtively easy to maintain the soft 
drink's nickel price. (The company's 
net profit last year was approximately 
$38,000,000.) 

Throughout the years advertising 
has contributed greatly to Coca-Cola's 
over-all success. The theme of its ad- 
vertising remains that of "pleasant- 
ness": pleasant atmophere, pleasant 
girl, pleasant music and, of course, a 
pleasant drink — "The Pause That Re- 
freshes." 

More than any other company in 
the industry, Coca-Cola needs national 
radio; and they are the top spenders 
for network programs among soft 
drink companies. The company spon- 
sors the Charlie McCarthy Program 
over CBS, half an hour on Sunday 
evenings, at an estimated time cost of 
over $20,000 per broadcast. Also 
sponsored are Songs By Morton Dow- 
ney over NBC, 15 minutes three times 
a week, at an approximate time cost 
of $22,000 per week; and the Pause 



That Refreshes On The Air (CBS), a 
Sunday evening half-hour show (sum- 
mer replacement for the McCarthy 
show) . 

The company has been prone to 
pick up, change, or drop shows more 
(Please turn to page 48) 




Promotion for new bottle top includes TV spots 



3 JULY 1950 



21 




PART ONE 



OF A 2-PART STORY 



learty every 
station has one 



The hundreds of telephone gimmiek 

shows on the air aren't original, 
but they're doing fine for sponsors 



Jim Shelton, Quiz MC on WIBC, Indianapolis, loves that phone 



over-all 



There is hardly a radio sta- 
tion in the United States 
that hasn't combined Bell and Marconi 
with gratifying results. With almost 
30.000.000 telephone-equipped radio 
homes, and the telephone book avail- 
able to every radio station MC, this is 
no surprise. 

sponsor surveyed network and spot 
to find out how telephone shows stand 
today. It came to the following con- 
clusions : 

1. The high-water mark of network 
phone programs has passed; 
there are fewer now than in the 
past five or 10 years. 
But telephone programs are in- 



2. 



creasing on individual stations. 

3. There's nothing like a telephone 
quiz show to bolster weak listen- 
ing periods. Adjacent spots shine 
in reflected glory. 

4. Phone programs are naturals for 
participations; just as good for 
complete sponsorship. 

5. Although "something for noth- 
ing" gives network shows appeal, 
entertainment is essential. Local 
programs can get away with less 
entertainment because the chance 
of winning is greater. 

6. Spot telephone shows can be 
bought as syndicated packages or 
they can be cooked up in the 



home kitchen. 
7. Don't guess about the anti-lottery 
law, find out definitely from 
your lawyer when considering a 
new telephone show. The FCC 
has some rules pending that will 
make present ones seem tame by 
comparison. 
There are two basic ways of linking 
the telephone to a radio show: the pro- 
gram can call the listener; or the MC 
can invite wholesale calls from the au- 
dience. Actually, the hectic days of 
Major Bowes and his tens of thousands 
of incoming calls are coming to an 
end. Few current network or local 
shows invite mass audience response 



Posters at Pittsburgh gas station promote Tello-Test stanza on KDKA 




Chvvh these points before putting on 
your own telephone quiz show: 

1. See a lawyer first. He'll check what's permissible, what isn't 

2. Have the station call the listener, rather than vice versa — tele- 
phone banks cost money, take time, and tying up of lines dis- 
rupts normal phone service 

*{. Choose an MC with persouality. That's what holds a show 
together, keeps it going indefinitely 

|. Put part of the contest in your store to increase traffic. 
Tune-o is an example 

5. Give the show advance and continuing publicity. And don't 
overlook the free publicity that comes from human-interest 
stories on the program 

(i. Look around carefully for prizes. There are well-defined 
sources of supply today 

X . If there's a choice between a few large prizes and many small 
ones, choose the smaller ones and maintain interest 

11, Don't rely on the giveaway appeal alone, incorporate enter- 
tainment, competition, and curiosity as well 



by phone. Station-to-listener calls are 
the pattern today. 

With a few exceptions (like Wel- 
come Traveler on NBC), the phone is 
a device for extending the reach of 
quiz programs. This holds true for 
network shows, for syndicated package 
programs, and local-station inspira- 
tions. 

Whether network or local, telephone- 
quiz programs have basic appeals 
which give them their perpetual popu- 
larity. The differences between them 
are a matter of the amount of each 
appeal provided for in the formal of a 
given show. A composite opinion from 
research experts like Dr. Herta Herzog 
of McCann-Erickson and Oscar Katz 
of CBS boils down the four main sat- 
isfactions of telephone quizzes. The 
listener gets: 

A chance at something for noth- 




ing. 



tunes. 



Entertainment (the quiz 
chatter, skits). 

A feeling of superiority when 
contestants muff the easy ques- 
tions. 
4. A chance to learn about the per- 
sonalities of the contestants, sat- 
isfying the curiosity all people 
have about other human beings. 
The format of network telephone 
*hows leans most heavily on point 2 — 
entertaiment. Mark Goodson and Bill 
Todman. producers of Stop the Music 
on ABC and Hit the Jackpot on CBS. 
explain it this way: "In local shows 
the chance of winning is fairly good, 
but when you spray the whole coun- 
try with a dozen calls, you need more 
than just big prizes to keep an audi- 
ence. Our specialty is entertainment; 
the telephone is only along for the 
ride. If you still think the prize is 
the big thing, one program reduced 
its jackpot last year by one-half. Their 
audience since then has risen 40', ." 

Goodson and Todman's Stop the 
Music was the first big network tele- 
phone program. Its format involves 
random calls to people all over the 
country. Phone contestants are first 
asked to identify the title of a song 
whose lyrics have been changed by the 
program's vocalists. Correct identifica- 
tion of the first tune entitles the con- 
testant to a crack at the "Mystery Mel- 
ody." So far, 27 of the 1,200 people 
called have guessed its name and col- 
lected a total of $500,000 in jackpot 
prizes. Studio contestants can win a 
smaller prize if they succeed in identi- 
( Please turn to page 42 ) 



NETWORK: "Stop the Music" emphasizes entertainment along with its telephone quiz format 




SYNDICATED:"Know Your America 



J CHOCOLATE SVIUP O 

MAlTEDKlU 



on WJR and other outlets, is sold by W. E. Long Co. 





LOCAL-BUILT: KASI Telequiz sold coffee effectively. It's home-brewed phone program 



3 JULY 1950 



23 




Minutes: new radio/TV 



measurement 



Researcher Sindlinger substitutes time for share 

of audience in study of every-room listening 



over-all 



Put away the crying tow- 
els; radio is more alive 
than ever. 

In atypical Philadelphia, where TV 
sets have burgeoned from 85,000 to 
207,000 in the past year, evening tele- 
vision viewing (7 to 10 p.m.) soared 
I2.V, from April L949 to February 
L950. ^ et total radio listening fell off 
onlj L9%! (With outside-the-home 
listening placed at roughly IV, of 
home listening per da\ by other sur- 
veys, radio's drop is even less.) 



24 



Just as important, recent research 
by the Sindlinger company shows 
that after a year of decline radio lis- 
tening bounces back substantially in 
TV homes. There is more than twice 
as much radio listening in homes 
which have had telesets over one year, 
as in those with TV less than a year. 
To be exact, 34.0 minutes of radio lis- 
tening after a >ear's TV ownership; 
14.8 minutes before. 

These are only two of the stimulat- 
ing findings recently made known to 



clients of Sindlinger & Co., media 
analysts of Philadelphia. Clients spon- 
soring the study were CBS, MBS. 
NBC, KYW, WCAU. WDAS, WFIL. 
WIBG, WIP, WJMJ, and WPEN. 
Copies of the report are also avail- 
able to others. The Sindlinger organi- 
zation expects demand from stations all 
over the country. 

How can these findings be correct 
when other media analysis announce 
that TV is playing havoc with radio? 
The answer lies in a radically differ- 

SPONSOR 



ent approach to measuring radio and 
television listening. The Sindlinger 
technique measures the medium 
against minutes available in a day, 
using an electronic device and a fixed 
sample. 

Here's how the system works. 
Every radio and television set in the 
342 sample Sindlinger homes is tapped 
by Radox, a device which permits 
Sindlinger monitors to hear what's 
coming out of loudspeakers. By turn- 
ing one set of switches, operators can 
listen in on first one receiver, then 
another. A second set of switches 
tunes in any one of Philadelphia's sev- 
eral radio and TV stations. Matching 
up home signal and station signal en- 
ables operators to tell where listeners 
are tuned. No home signal at all, 
means there is no listening going on. 

In deciding how to present his lis- 
tening measurements, Sindlinger side- 
stepped what he calls "rubber rulers." 
From the first, his findings rested on 
one unshifting base: the 24 hours in a 
day. By using time as a yardstick, 
every human activity within the day 
can be measured and reported in a 
standard manner. Further, the system 
entailed converting the hours into 
minutes — 1,440 per day. Thus, the rat- 
ing of any particular activity (like 
radio listening or TV viewing) is 
reckoned in so many of the 1,400 
minutes per day. This makes broad- 
cast ratings comparable to reading 
time, card playing time, and so on. 

It was the time approach which led 
to the vital discovery that, despite in- 
creasingly heavy tele-viewing, radio 
listening didn't suffer in the same pro- 
portion. TV's gain of 37 minutes from 
other evening activities over the past 
year did not mean a cut of 37 min- 
utes in radio listening time. Sind- 
linger's study showed that of the 37 
minutes added to TV viewing between 
7 and 10 p.m., only 11 minutes were 
subtracted from previous radio listen- 
ing time. The other 26 minutes came 
from activities other than radio listen- 
ing: reading, conversation, even sleep- 
ing. The total time devoted to the 
broadcast media is 33% up over a 
year ago. 

Sindlinger would be the last to claim 
that radio listening has dropped only 
19% during the 7 to 10 p.m. hours in 
television homes, over the past year. 
This figure is an average of all Phila- 
delphia homes, TV with radio and ra- 
dio only. What partially offsets more 



Activities other than radio lose most time to TV* 



April 3 : radio 
1949 54 mill, 



TV 
31 miJ 



reading, 
theatre, etc, 
95 rain. 



radio 



Feb. 5 43 mln# 

1950 i ii min. leaa 



TV 
68 min. 

37 min. more 



reading, 
theatre, etc. 

G9 min. 

26 min. leas 



8 



10 pm 



*Source: Sindlinger and Co. 



intensive tele-viewing, is the continu- 
ing increase in the size of Philadel- 
phia's radio audience. Radio homes 
have increased by 12,000 or two per- 
cent; the number of sets has risen 68,- 
000 or six percent in the last year. 
Coupled with this is the increasing 
amount of radio listening among TV 
owners of more than a year's stand- 
ing. This group now listens to the 
radio 34.0 minutes an evening, be- 
tween 7 and 10. Radio-only homes lis- 
ten to radio an average of 89 minutes 
an evening, but as soon as these fam- 
ilies acquire a TV set, radio listening 
dives to 14.8 minutes. The trend to- 
ward more radio listening after the 
TV set has been used for over a year 
continues, according to present indi- 
cations. 

Other findings of equal interest in 
the Sindlinger study include evidence 
of definite radio listening patterns. 



One pattern among a number spotted 
by Sindlinger: Saturday evening lis- 
tening is not as strong as weekday or 
Sunday evening listening. Evidence 
points to deficient programing rather 
than lack of available listeners as the 
cause. 

TV viewing patterns are not well- 
defined, Sindlinger found. Individual 
families vary tremendously in their 
preferences. The key factor in time 
spent on TV viewing is programing, 
rather than the age of a teleset, the 
Sindlinger report shows. There are no 
indications yet as to whether viewing 
habits will settle down or continue to 
fluctuate with individual families. 

Another interesting Sindlinger find- 
ing is the shift in program preferences 
which takes place with purchase of a 
TV set. When TV viewers go back to 
their radios after the initial novelty 
(Please turn to page 51) 



Philadelphia TV ratings are 


not 


typical* 






New York 


Chicago 




Los Angeles 


Philadelphia 


CBS 


13.7 


13.6 




11.0 


16.3 


NBC 


17.6 


16.4 




8.1 


24.1 


Duitf 


9.6 


10.3 




7.0 


12.6 


ABC 


8.9 


11.8 




7.1 


12.6 


*Ratings are for average quarter 


hour, seven < 


Jays, ( 


>-l2 p.m., April 


1950. 


Source: Telepulse 













3 JULY 1950 



25 



How 




9 



S 

does it 

Firm is busy buying the 

most ears per dollar, has 
open mind on shows 



spot 



The month of June was — if 
the Borden Company will 
pardon the expression — Na- 
tional Dairy Month. The vital role 
played by the cow in the U.S. economy 
was underlined by the disclosure that 
one out of every 15 persons in this 
county depends on the dairy industry 
for his livelihood, directly or indirect- 
ly. It follows that Borden s and its 
major land larger! competitor, Na- 
tional Dairies, as leaders in the indus- 
try, are two of the most important 
businesses in the nation. Borden's 
near-$700.000.000 gross in 1949 makes 
it a leader in any sales category. And 
its decision to drop network radio 
for spot, announced last February, 
provided food for thought for thou- 
sands of other national advertisers. 

A $10,000,000 advertiser — and a 
$1,500,000 radio and TV spender- 
doesn't leap without looking. Borden's 
had looked long and searchingly into 
its merchandising empire before leap- 
ing into spot radio. Since only three 
months have elapsed since the change- 
over (the spot campaign began at the 
end of March ) it's too earl) to tell 
whether Hordon has leaped to solider 
ground. Rut. already, an interesting 




OLD Borden campaign was anchored to network radio. County Fair, on CBS, went off in Apri 



picture has emerged of how Borden 
has been implementing its new radio 
timebuying philosophy. 

To set the stage for the story of Bor- 
den's current activity it's necesseary to 
backtrack a bit, to 1 April. On that 
date the company pulled the plug on its 
CBS radio show. County Fair. This 
was no reflection on the show, on CBS. 
or on network radio. It was simply the 
result of Borden's conclusion that its 
merchandising structure was incom- 
patible with the structure of network 
radio. 

Borden's sells cheese, coffee, and 
other groceries in addition to milk 
and ice cream; the latter products rep- 
resent about 65% of the company's 
total sales. And only half of the 165 
cities where County Fail- was heard 
were market areas for Borden fluid 
milk or ice cream. Obviously, at a pen- 
etration cost of nearly $5.00 per thou- 
sand homes. Borden's was not getting 
full sales value for its advertising dol- 
lar. ( The company's position, however, 
is that it did get a necessary and ex- 
tremely valuable buildup for the Bor- 
den name from the network show.) 

If network radio was not the answer 
to Borden's merchandising problem, 
some sort of spot plan definitely was. 
The company's distribution pattern 
forms a \ ast patchwork blanket thrown 
across the nation, but the patches are 
irregular and unevenly spaced. Bor- 
den's decentralized operation and its 
complicated marketing mechanism are 
a challenge even to the extreme flexi- 
bility which is the greatest virtue of 



spot radio advertising. 

The company's approach to spot 
buying is as simple and as direct as 
can be: Borden will buy a station onl\ 
in an area where it has something to 
sell. And if in that market the com- 
pany sells only grocery products, the 
Borden commercials w ill plug only gro- 
ceries and not milk and ice cream too. 

Accordingly. Borden's advertising 
men sat down some months ago with 
a map of Borden's U.S. markets, a sta- 
tion map, and a delegation from the 
Borden agency, \oung & Rubicam. The 
result of that session was a list of more 
than 70 cities to which the company is 
anchoring its current spot campaign. 

The list matches, as closely as sta- 
tion facilities permit. Borden's pattern 
of distribution. Concentration is heav\ 
along the Middle Atlantic seaboard. 
Florida, the Gulf States, parts of Ohio, 
much of Illinois and Wisconsin. In 
addition, there are operations in San 
Francisco. Pittsburgh. Kansas City, 
and St. Louis. 

There is nothing static or necessarily 
permanent about this setup. Borden's 
can and will shift out of these markets 
and into others to meet changing sea- 
sonal marketing conditions and to 
shift sales emphasis as the need de- 
velops. However, a close look at one 
segment of Borden's radio pie. as it ex- 
isted several weeks ago. will give an in- 
sight into what. how. when, and where 
Borden is waging its spot revolution. 

Since 27 March. Rorden has spon- 
sored an estimated total of 18 hours 
of program time each week on 27 sta- 



26 



SPONSOR 




NEW radio pitch is built around spot. A standout is Borden's daily variety show on WNEW 



lions in important Southern and South- 
western markets. The station list fol- 
lows : 

KALK Alexandria. Louisiana 

KGNC Amarillo, Texas 

W IIIO Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

KFDM Beaumont, Texas 

WLOX Biloxi, Mississippi 

KRIS Corpus Christi, Texas 

kid I) Dallas, Texas 

KSET El Paso, Texas 

KGCM Gulfport, Mississippi 

KTRH Houston, Texas 

WJDX Jackson, Mississippi 

KPLC Lake Charles, Louisiana 

KFRO Longview, Texas 

KMHT Marshall, Texas 

KCRS Midland, Texas 

WKRC Mobile, Alabama 

KMLB Monroe, Louisiana 

'WL New Orleans, Louisiana 

KTOK Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

KTAR Phoenix, Arizona 

KTSA San Antonio. Texas 

KTBS Shreveport, Louisiana 

KCMC Texarkana, Texas 

KGKB Tyler, Texas 

KVOL Lafayette, Louisiana 

^ AML Laurel, Mississippi 

KF\U Lubbock, Texas 

Almost half of the stations (11) are 
250-watters. Three are 50-kw outlets, 
nine are 5-kw, two are 10-kw, and two 
are 1-kw. Program types include news- 
casts, disk jockey shows, hillbilly mu- 
sic, and transcribed package shows in 
five, 10, and 15-minute segments. Fre- 
quencies range from three times week- 
ly to cross-the-board. Time of broad- 
cast ranges all the way from 7:30 a.m. 
to 4:15 p.m. 

Borden's basic plan in these markets 
was simply to buy "whatever type of 
program was required to deliver the 
most listeners per dollar in that par- 
ticular market."' Thus Borden bought 
the five-minute Popular Hit Tune of 
the Day in Alexandria, La., Monday- 
Friday, 11:25 a.m.; 15 minutes of 
luncheon music in Jackson, Miss., 



Monday-Friday at 12:45 p.m.; a 15- 
minute Bing Crosby record show in 
Texarkana. Monday-Friday at 11 a.m. 
In Beaumount, Texas, Borden bought 
a five-minute daily newscast at 4 p.m., 
and in Lafayette, La., a five-minute 
newscast at 9 :55 a.m. The company 
bought 15 minute of news in El Paso 
at 8 a.m., and 10 minutes at 7:30 a.m. 
in Tyler, Texas. In Baton Rouge, the 
Borden buy was a 15-minute tran- 
scribed Bob Eberly package show at 
8:45 a.m. on Monday. Wednesday, and 
Friday. In Dallas, a transcribed Barrv 
Wood package on the same schedule. 
A 15-minute Hillbilly Jamboree got the 
nod in Lake Charles. La., Monda\- 



Frdaj at 1:15 p.m., and a five-minute 
Cowboy Jamboree at 1:25 p.m. Mon- 
day-Friday in Shreveport. 

Where no satisfactory program was 
available, Borden selected time spots 
on the basis of Hooper. Conlan. and 
BMB ratings, and then bought a 
packaged program that would fit in- 
to the station's established program 
block. 

Borden's product diversity created 
a multitude of commercial copy prob- 
lems. For example: the company sells 
five kinds of cottage cheese in the 27 
markets listed, and so individual copy 
was written for each market. "Creole 
Cream Cheese"' for New Orleans, "Cot- 
tage Cheese and Chives" for Phoenix, 
and so on. These and all other Borden 
spot commercials are planned carefull) 
to tie in with local product promotions. 
Extensive newspaper and point-of-sale 
merchandising covers the same prod- 
ucts at the same time. 

At this stage, Borden's has no one 
program format in mind. It's seeking 
to get the most listeners per dollar in 
each market with whatever programs 
are available locally or in packages. In 
some cases, announcements rather than 
programs or announcements in addi- 
tion to programs are aired. Of interest 
to advertisers is Borden's feeling that 
it will take at least a year or two be- 
fore it can assess the worth of pro- 
grams vs. announcements and other 
phases of its spot operation. 

The switchover from network to spot 
has meant some decentralization in ad- 
I Please turn to page 46 i 




During evening hours in major markets Borden's uses TV announcements featuring Elsie, Elmer 



3 JULY 1950 



11 



By anybody's 




O , 9 



i 



count . 




There's been some pretty complicated arithmetic 

in radio lately. But the 1950 Winter season 

is over now and all the figures are in. No matter 

who totals them ... no matter what you count 

. . . two things come clear every time. Radio's clear 

leadership over all media in reaching people. 

And the continuing leadership of CBS in all radio. 

COUNT CIRCULATION... CBS reaches 
30,972,700* different families weekly . . . biggest 
circulation in radio. (And far bigger than any 
other advertising medium.) 

COUNT PROGRAM POPULARITY... 

CBS has broadcast 15 of the 20 most popular 
programs this year**. . . more than 3 times as 
many as the second-place network. 

COUNT AVERAGE RATING... CBS has an 

average nighttime rating of 11. 9... 32% higher 
than the second-place network.** 

COUNT HOMES PER DOLLAR... CBS 



reaches the average of 489 . 
the second-place network.*** 



17% more than 



2 , 7 



COUNT TOTAL BILLING... CBS advertisers 
increased their investment to $23,911,229**** 
. . . giving CBS the only 1950 network gain . . . 
8% higher billings than the second-place network. 

This is CBS in 1950 

-the greatest single advertising opportunity 
of them all . . . and you can count on that. 



•NIU. February-March, 1950 
"NKI, January-April, 1950 
•• Time ami talent night — January-March, 1950 
••I'IB. January-April, 1950 



■MnaSMMHH 



iiminnnfMwiniB 



Who's looking where? 

Sponsors want more detailed information about 
TV coverage as medium expands and rates grow 



This spring the Mohawk clippings I . Only last year sponsorship 

Carpet Company spon- of standard black and white television 

sored a series of colorcasts was at the same papa-playing-with-the- 

over WNBW. Washington. D. C, main- electric-train stage. 

ly in return for the delight and edifica- But the black-and-white medium has 

tion of experimenting with a new gadg- grown up in a hurry. The executive 

et (and a ream or two of newspaper who tossed $50,000 into TV three years 



m — 



ago so he could be the first $100,000- 
a-year man in his neighborhood to 
sponsor a television program, has set- 
tled down to a more serious approach. 
TV sponsors today measure many fac- 
tors before they buy. In addition to 
costs, they want to know: 

1. How many sets are there in the 
market? 

2. How far out will my program 
reach ? 

3. Is reception strong and clear 
everywhere I'm counting on TV 
to put across my message? 

They will become increasingly anx- 
ious for such facts (called coverage 
data in academic circles) as stations 
continue raising rates. 

But the coverage data available to- 
day is meagre: actual location of sets 
within each market is still unknown: 
measurement of area coverage is based 
on engineering and mail maps rather 




* Proposed FW Sttltttltirtls provide for three 
viewing zones. In "A" there's reception 9Q'/i of time at 90' < 
of locations; in "B" tO'/r at 70 %; in "C" 90'A at 507'- Imagi- 
nary drawing above is simplified presentation of standard'., 
based on maximum-power stations only; FCC proposals indicate 
it is thinking of TV in terms of more than the original 40-mile 
reception estimates. Inner edge of shaded area above is maxi- 
mum of "C" zone on channels 7-13. But "C" for channels 2-6 
extends to black line 57 miles out because lower-channel signals 
have greater range. The picture quality varies with the zone. 



100 miles 
or more 




freak 
conditions 



than on accurate in-home surveys. 

This article and its accompanying 
illustrations are designed to help spon- 
sors interpret the few facts which are 
available; and to remind them that if 
they want the full picture, it's up to 
them to demand it. To let grass grow 
under the feet, is human . . . and TV 
executives are busy with countless oth- 
er problems. Probably, pressure from 
advertisers won't get immediate results, 
but as more stations get in the black, 
more money for surveys will become 
available. 

If you ask a station for coverage in- 
formation today, the answer you're 
most likely to get is in the form of an 
engineering chart. A topical specimen 
is shown at right. As a glance will re- 
veal, the chart consists of three irregu- 
larly shaped circles (called contours in 
technicalese I . surrounding the station 
location. Contours are irregular be- 
cause terrain variations influence 
strength with which the signal carries. 
The first contour is labeled 5 mv/m 
(for millivolts per meter). Millivolts 
are a measure of signal strength in 
TV broadcasting as they are in AM. 
Within the 5 mv/m contour, potential 
customers are most apt to get strong 
and clear pictures. 

The second and third contours in 
the sample chart are labeled .5 mv m 
and 0.1 mv/m respectively. They mark 
off secondary and tertiary viewing 
areas. In general, viewing will be 
easier on the consumer's eyes within 
the second than within the third con- 
tour. But the reverse is frequently 
true in large cities where interference 
from busses, diathermy, and other TV 
sets plagues second-contour reception 
which would otherwise be good. 

You'll notice that the 0.1 mv/m line 
in the chart is dotted. That's because 
it's a relatively new measurement. 
The stations have found reception 
can go on almost indefinitely. Freak 
cases have been reported in which 
viewers picked up stations 500 miles 
or more away. And anyone who's tak- 
en a ride in a car through the "fringe 
areas" surrounding a television city 
knows that roofs are still pronged with 
antennas 50 or more miles from the 
station. Many stations have mail maps 
indicating reception 60 or more miles 
away. 

WKY-TV. Oklahoma City, for ex- 
ample, reports consistent sales results 
for sponsors 90 miles away from Okla- 
homa City. And the station recentlv 
received a letter reporting good recep- 

3 JULY 1950 




Millivolts per meter (mv/m) is measure of signal strength. Outer contour is over 50 miles out 



tion in Hatfield. Arkansas 200 miles 
away. 

Bob Tincher, general manager of 
WNAX, Yankton, S. D., reports an 
even more amazing case. He says there 
is a man in Yankton who picks up 
WBTV, Charlotte, N. C, two or three 
times a week. 

The F.C.C. has proposed a set of 
coverage standards for "A," "B," and 
"C" service. And the large drawing 
accompanying this article is based on 
these standards. 

Once the TV urge becomes strong in 
a locality, viewers spare no expense to 
bring Milton Berle, Hoppy, and the 
Keystone cops into their living rooms. 
They buy antenna towers 50 feet high, 
gadgets for remote control rotation of 
the antenna, and electrical boosters. 

Just how many sets with fancy an- 
tennas there are catching signals back 
in television's outfield, no one knows. 
Home-by-home surveys aren't yet con- 
sidered worth their cost. No one 
knows, in fact, just how ownership of 
TV sets divides between all the var- 
ous sections of any TV city. But, as 
sponsors will discover, every station 
has an estimate of total sets in its area. 



The basic source for most estimates 
of set installations is the area distribu- 
tor. But there are several different 
ways in which installations are re- 
ported. 

In one-station markets, a station 
manager can easily get figures from 
distributors and adjust for difference- 
between them and dealer sales. In larg- 
er markets, however, it is easier for a 
committee representing all stations to 
do this chore. Station committees in 
Washington and Baltimore, for exam- 
ple, do the job. 

Electrical associations frequentlv 
take care of the checking for stations 
in their areas (as is the case in Chi- 
cago, Philadelphia. St. Louis, and else- 
where) . Some stations contact dealers 
every month for sales records; some 
cross-check by comparing distributor- 
dealer reports with the number of new 
names who write in for schedules. 

In adjusting the distributor-dealer 
figures, more conservative stations al- 
low a 30-day lag for sets to move off 
the dealers floor. In other areas, sta- 
tions claim four or five days arc 
enough. Sponsors who are given sets- 
in-the-area estimates should check into 
l Please turn to page 40) 



31 





Mr. Runkle 



The 

picked panel 

answers 

Mr. Anderson 



My viewpoint on 
this question 
must necessarily 
be that of an 
agencyman who 
is handling re- 
gional and local 
accounts with ad- 
vertising budgets 
that are more 
limited than those 
of national ad- 
vertisers. Perhaps I can best answer 
your question with a question. 

What happens when a family is 
blessed with a new baby? Where does 
the money come from to buy clothes 
and food for the new arrival? Is it 
taken away from other children in the 
family? Are they given less to eat, 
less to wear? 

Obviously, the answer is "No." Re- 
gardless of how limited the family in- 
come may be, the budget must be re- 
arranged to take care of the "new 
baby." 

In my opinion, it's much the same 
way with the newest member of the 
media family — television. 

With the limited budgets we have 
for local and regional advertisers, we 
cannot afford to siphon money from 
other media to buy television. Yet 
how can his advertising counsel rec- 
ommend that an advertiser sit by and 
watch his competitors take the lead in 
using a powerful new medium that is 
growing by leaps and bounds? 

It seems to me that the only solution 



Mr. Sponsor asks... 



In my consideration of TV advertising, front which 
pari of the budget should the money come? 



Olof V. Anderson 



is for advertisers to increase their ad- 
vertising budgets sufficiently to allow 
them to include television without sac- 
rificing the media they have been us- 
ing. Later, if this new medium proves 
to be more potent than the older mem- 
bers of the media family, the normal 
adjustments that would be made in any 
advertising budget under such circum- 
stances can be made. 

While television, through its power 
of demonstration, probably comes clos- 
er to being an actual salesman than 
any other advertising medium yet de- 
vised, it cannot, except for mail orders, 
close the sale and collect the money. 
Therefore, money for television should 
not come from the sales budget unless, 
of course, an additional appropriation 
is made for this purpose. 

In short, until television has proved 
what it can or cannot do for an adver- 
tiser, I believe that the money to buy 
it should come from a special appro- 
priation, rather than at a sacrifice to 
other media or to the sales force. 
Lowe Runkle 

Lowe Runkle Company, advertising 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 



The most direct 
answer I can 
give, to what is 
certainly a very 
real problem, is 
that the money 
for television ad- 
vertising should 
come from that 
part of the bud- 
get very clearly 
marked "televi- 
sion." This impact-loaded medium has 
surely reached the stage where it war- 
rants an appropriation of its own rath- 
er than living on money purloined 




Mr. Wallace 



President 

Anson Incorporated, Providence, R. I. 



from other parts of the budget. 

Television has dramatically come of 
age and any national advertiser who 
does not recognize the impact of tele- 
vision and fails to establish a fran- 
chise now, may soon be facing a seri- 
ous competitive disadvantage. At the 
same time, for any advertiser selling a 
mass-consumed product, a direct line 
of communication with all of America 
is essential. Television has already 
proved that it can pay its own way; 
yet even its most ardent supporters do 
not claim that it is a national medium 
nor that it can do the entire advertis- 
ing job. Thus the need for an addi- 
tional appropriation. 

However, during this transitional 
period while television is growing to 
its full maturity and actually growing 
faster than many advertising budgets, 
it is understandable that it many cases 
advertising expediency may replace 
long-range planning. In such cases, 
where budgetary restrictions are such 
that the present advertising appropria- 
tion must be realigned to accommo- 
date television, it seems only logical to 
look at the media budget for any pos- 
sible duplication of effort. Television 
is basically a visual medium. There- 
fore, it would seem sensible to inspect 
that part of the budget devoted to oth- 
er visual media to find the necessary 
funds for television. Specifically, this 
means newspapers and magazines. On 
a straight cost-per-thousand compari- 
son, television is already out-matching 
printed media in many of the nation's 
top markets. On the basis of visual im- 
pact, there can be no doubt of televi- 
sion's superiority. If network radio is 
also part of the budget, there is no 
substitution for the mass coverage job 
it can do and it is the only medium 
which is entirely complementary to tel- 



32 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Adams 



evision. The two media together add 
up to mass coverage plus impact. 

George W. Wallace 

Manager radio sales planning & 
research 

NBC 

New York 

Television has 
taken its place as 
a major mass ad- 
vertising and sell- 
ing medium. It 
is deserving of 
the same study 
and considera- 
tion which is giv- 
en other mass 
media. 

Television i s 
the only medium which can success- 
fully sell all products and services. Tel- 
evision can replace home and store 
demonstration. Television can imple- 
ment a manufacturer's sales force in 
opening up new channels of distribu- 
tion and dealer outlets. Television can 
sell by mail or phone. Television can 
present a message most compellingly. 
Because television is a new sales 
force, I believe that the budget for tele- 
vision should come from three places: 
1) new money; 2) from sales and sales 
promotion budgets; 3) from budgets 
for other advertising media. 

Any manufacturer realizes that in 
order to create a new demand for his 
product, he must spend new money. 
Television can create a new demand, 
and in anticipation of a wider sales 
horizon, the manufacturer should set 
up, wherever possible, a new budget 
to cover his television expenditures. 

Because television can show a prod- 
uct in use and demonstrate its utility 
and beauty, it must be considered as 
part of the sales force, and, therefore, 
a part of the sales and sales promotion 
budget should be diverted to television. 
Consideration should be given to the 
effect television has on all other adver- 
tising media. How a budget should be 
adjusted would to a great extent be 
dependent on the media formerly used 
and how much effect the advent of tel- 
evision has had on each of these me- 
dia. It is logical to conclude that the 
advertising budget for other media 
should share a percentage of any con- 
sideration for television. 

J. Trevor Adams 
Assistant director of sales 
DuMont 
New York 



In Buffalo you can go places 
— fast with MM 




—AND ITS HIGHER-THAN-EVER RATINGS 





Leo J. ("Fitz") Fitzpatrick 
I. R. ("Ike") Lounsberry 



RAND BUILDING, BUFFALO 3, N. Y. 

National Representatives: Free & Peters, Inc. 



3 JULY 1950 



33 






tf% 



OR 
BUT — ®* I f $J ® 

BES 

WRNL 



the 



1 -ONLY 

RICHMOND, VA. 
STATION THAT 

G,VK COMPLETE 

IN THE 

RICH-RICHMOND 

TRADING AREA 
HERE'S WHY: 

There are 5 Radio Stations in 
Richmond, Virginia. 

50,000 WATT 

1,40 KC— DIRECTIONAL 

5000 WATT 

1380 KC— DIRECTIONAL 

250 WATT 

1450 KC— LOCAL 

1000 WATT 

950 KC— DAYTIME 

and the "I and ONLY 

UJRI1L 

5000 WATTS 
NON-DIRECTIONAL 

910 KC AFMUATE 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 




This is a new SPONSOR department, featuring capsulec 
reports of broadcast advertising significance culled from 
all segments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed. 



l»itiotitit*(*r Is Important 
cog in radio sales pitch 

Sponsors worry about getting the 
proper time slots, commercials that 
sell, and good coverage. Thev often 



buildup through a public address sys- 
tem 30 minutes before the promotion. 
Then came the audience building de- 
vice. One hundred balloons were filled 
with certificates entitling the bearer to 



forget an important element in their jackpot prizes, throwaways with pro- 



sales pitch — the man who delivers 
their message. 

WAEB. Allentown's, traffic man- 
ager. Martin Muskat. warns that on 
some stations sponsors lose out when : 

a I the announcer fails to look over 
the commercial copy and product 
names and slogans are mangled or mis- 
pronounced. 

b I a celebrity shows up unexpected- 
ly in the middle of a disk jockey show. 
The announcer may be so impressed at 
this opportunity to interview the star 
he forgets to read the spot for Whoozis 
Soap. 

Mr. Muskal adds it may not be a life 
or death matter to stick grimly to a 
split-second timetable but it makes for 
better production and happier spon- 
sors to have a staff man read a 25-sec- 
ond chain break in 25 seconds instead 
of drawling lazily through and fading 
clumsily into the next net program. 



$2.50 promotion sparks 
mail pall of WSTC program 

WSTC, Stamford, wanted to develop 
a write-in audience for jackpot con- 




EDWARD PETRY & CO. INC.. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



$2.50 for balloons helped build up audience 

tests on their Mr. Tall & Mr. Small 
show and they did for $2.50. 

Spot promotion was run on WSTC 
for a week in addition to a broadcast 



gram information, and theatre passes 
as consolation awards. 

The balloon barrage attracted a 
crowd of several hundred in front of 
the studio, causing police to halt traf- 
fic. Now, Mr. Tall & Mr. Small is well 
established on the 7:30 p.m. time slot 
three times a week with a good dailv 
contest mail pull. 

That promotional cost again — $2.50 
for the balloons. 



"Sell it'" Campaign 
alerts (RV staff 

Promotional procedure was reversed 

recently at CKX in Brandon. Manitoba. 

A "Sell It"' campaign was directed 




Sponsor products remind staff to sell hard 

to the station staff instead of a sales 
pitch aimed at the buyer. Its main 
point was to show the station staff that 
CKX was in the selling business. 

One night after sign-off time. Pro- 
motion Director Archie Olson took 
boxes full of merchandise to the CKX 
building. He displayed the goods on 
studio walls, offices and desks. In the 
merchandise was pinned "Sell It" 
signs. 

It came as a big surprise to station 
employees the next morning but drove 
home an important fact: behind each 
program and announcement was real 
merchandise thai retailers were selling. 
with the help of station personnel. 



34 



SPONSOR 



Clothing concern uses 
"rfummtf" to MC quiz show 

The Rockingham Clothing Company 
of Richmond uses its "trademark" to 
MC its Vis-A-Quiz on WTVR, Rich- 
mond, Va. 

The "trademark" is Rocky, a life- 
sized dressed dummy who opens the 
quiz show with his head bobbing up 
and down as he invites the audience to 
help him quiz his guests. The dummy's 
voice is furnished, out of camera range, 
by quizmaster Harry Luke. 

The program features four guests, 
representatives of city organizations, 
who work in teams of two. Rocky gives 
the questions and shows the clues. The 
winning team receives a check for $25 
to be used in any charity they pick. 

Live models are used, showing the 
latest styles and fabrics of Rockingham 
clothiers. As each model is shown to 




MC of this WTVR, Richmond, quiz is dummy 

the video audience. Rocky explains the 
salient features and points out the fine 
quality of Rockingham clothes. 

Rocky and his bosses, the Rocking- 
ham Clothing Company, are in their 
second season of quizzing and selling 
the people of Richmond via WTVR. 



Four Tucson stations plug 
summer selling campaign 

Four network affiliates, the Chamber 
of Commerce, and the merchants of 
Tucson don't believe in a radio hiatus. 
Instead, they've banded together pro- 
motionally to invigorate summer busi 
ness in their city. 

The merchants are cooperating bv 
paying for broadcast time on KVOA 
I NBC); KCNA (ABC); KTUC 
(MBS); and KOPO (CBS), plugging 
the "summer selling" campaign. 

During July merchants will give 
their customers a dollar certificate for 
each dollar spent. At the end of the 
month, these certificates will be good 
at an auction. 

The four cooperating stations are 
also distributing a series of 18 promo- 
tion pieces showing why radio is the 
advertising medium to use. 



Before-and-after storg 
proves power of radio 

This before-and-after story is not a 
plug for hair restorer or weight reduc- 
ing pills. It is the story of the Sutliff 
Chevrolet Company of Harrisburg and 
what they achieved with their radio 
advertising on WHP. 

Before using radio, the company 
averaged 450-500 lubrication jobs a 
month. Then owner Ellis Sutliff decided 
to use radio. 

From 489 lubrication jobs a month, 
the company hit a high of 1.104 
monthly after a year on the air. Their 
original goal was 1,000. 

Radio expenditures come to some 
$600 a month in addition to announce- 
ments. 

The company sponsors Top of the 
Morning daily from 7:45-8 a.m., 15 
minutes of news, sports and music. 

Besides the lubrication jobs, Mr. 
Sutliff uses his air time to sell new and 
used cars and trucks. 



Brieflg . . . 

KFEL. Denver, cancelled their 10 
p.m. broadcast of / Love a Mystery be- 
cause of commercial commitments — 
then the deluge started. Listeners 
swamped the switchboard with calls, 
and over 500 written requests were 
received pleading for continuation. As 
a result, the show was rescheduled 
from 10:30 to 10:45 p.m. 

WAVZ, New Haven independent, 
specializes in on-the-scene reports for 
their newscasts. Everytime there is a 
fire in the city, a gong rings in the 
radio station, and reporters equipped 
with battery-powered recorders are on 

the scene like old fire horses. 

* ♦ * 

The first television show and exhibit 
in the history of Houston will be spon- 
sored by the Houston Post from 3-5 
July. The affair will celebrate the 25th 
anniversary of the Post's NBC affiliate 
KPRC and the paper's entry into video. 
The Houston Post acquired KLEE-TV, 
will change call letters to KPRC-TV. 





1 



Spot 



and 



1 



Spot 
Only 



Your spot announcement on KVOO is the 
only one heard between the two programs 
scheduled at the time of your announcement. 
No double spotting is permitted at KVOO. 

Before you okeh any radio schedule on any 
station make sure there's . . . One spot and 
one spot only scheduled at the time of your 
announcement. 



^Jlie a&iffi 



ere nee 



between an effective announcement and one 
that is merely "heard" on the air is often- 
times just the difference between one an- 
nouncement and two! 

One announcement properly delivered with 
enough time for the emphasis of silence as 
well as menage is worth many times that of 
hurried, word-piled-upon-word announcement. 
Get everything out of your announcement by 
using KVOO. 

EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 

National Representatives 

50.000 WATTS 

NBC AFFILIATE 




Key to KLEE-TV, Houston, changes hands 



BLANKETS OKLAHOMA'S 
NO. 1 MARKET 



3 JULY 1950 



35 



VARIETY STORE 




AUTOMOBILES 1 


SPONSOR: Watertown Variety Store AGENCY: Direct 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: One announcement at an 
approximate cost of $8 brought the following sales results 
within the next six hours: 152 Canasta trays sold at 29c: 
74 decks of cards at 89c; 60 score pads at 10c. Thus, 
there was a total volume of $115.94, according to the 
manager of the store. The manager also notes that this 
one announcement brought at least 150 other customers 
into the store, adding greatly to usual traffic. 

W \\ NY, Watertown, N. Y. PROGRAM: Harriette Meets 

The Ladies 


SPONSOR: Ward Motors AGENCY: Direct 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Between 28 March and 15 
May, the above firm sold 20 Hillman-Minx cars. The 
gross take was over $35,000. The outlay for radio ad- 
vertising was $159.80. A sidelight to the story is that 
the sponsor was a new account and skeptical. He had 
started his radio advertising on the recommendation of 
other local businessmen. He is continuing his radio ad- 
vertising and is pleased ivith the results. 

CKX, Brandon, Manitoba PROGRAM: Announcements 

Co-sponsor of two sport broadcasts 




SAVINGS ASSOCIATION 




RADIO 
RESULTS 




SPONSOR: Central Federal Savings AGENCY: Direct 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This savings and loan as- 
sociation had never used radio before. Then three daily 
announcements were bought at an approximate cost of 
$20. For the first three weeks of the campaign, savings 
accounts were emphasized, with a radio given to each 
new account of $20 or more. Original supply of radios 
was exhausted and two reorders cleaned out. Sponsor 
then plugged FHA loans. After two weeks, they were 
swamped with applications. No other media were used. 

WOHI, East Liverpool, O. PROGRAM: Announcements 


FOOD 




APPLIANCES j 


SPONSOR: Milani AGENCY: Jordan Co. 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The company took on par- 
tial sponsorship of the Living Should Be Fun program 
($250 cost). To test the pulling power of the program, 
they offered a free bottle of Milani s 1890 Salad Dress- 
ing. The offer was made for one week in January and 
approximately 20,000 letters and cards were received. 
In fact, as late as 28 March, letters were still coming in 
although offer was good for only one week. 

WMGM, New York PROGRAM: Living Should Be Fun 


SPONSOR: General Appliance Co. AGENCY: Direct 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This advertiser used three 
5-miniite programs daily at an approximate cost of $48. 
In one month, the sponsor sold 126 Apex washing ma- 
chines; he gave merchandise certificates worth $25 to- 
ward purchase price for the correct identification of a 
mystery tune. In addition, the store sold Apex driers, 
vacuum cleaners, refrigerators, and ranges. The sponsor 
says it added up to the biggest sales month he ever had. 

KLX, Oakland PROGRAM: Music 


TREE NURSERY 




NOVELTIES 




SPONSOR: Sterns AGENCY: Kiesewetter, Wetterau, & Baker 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This tree nursery firm in 
Geneva, N. Y., decided to plug their chestnut trees. They 
used seven, one-minute announcements on an early morn- 
ing show, Chanticleer. The trees had to be ordered direct 
from the nursery with cash enclosed. The result was some 
$900 in sales with a total expenditure for radio advertis- 
ing of only $148.75 or an investment of a trifle over 16% 
of the sales. 
WGY, Schenectady PROGRAM: Chanticleer 


SPONSOR: Save-ByMail Inc. AGENCY: Direct 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: An offer of five animal 
balloons for $1.00 was spread over seven programs dur- 
ing a two-week period. Ten one-minute announcements 
on Your Neighbor Lady; 18 announcements on Calling 
All Kids; announcements on one Saturday evening Mis- 
souri Valley Barn Dance and the Sunday Get-Together. 
Total number of orders sold: 6,049 — total sales $6,049. 
Cost to the advertiser $872.50. Cost per order 14.4c. 

WNAX, Yankton, S. D. PROGRAM: Various 



' 



ffbu. Vim* B"f»~ _^.- 

, *„* nil/ £m/-^^>t^^«^^ 



etceesTMOfo bargain 

iH TH£ US. rOOAYf 



T 



• 



I 



^LJf [ TIME 

eACH\RATe> 

fact /fab/e P/g/lf Now: Spots between High-Rated 
National Shows!.. Spots on or between long- 
established Local Shows!.. News Programs ! 
Sports ! Mutual Co-ops ! (1060 ON YOUR DIAL) 

25 YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL SERVICE TO ADVERTISERS! 



MUTUAL 

BROADCASTING 

SYSTEM 



James A. Noe, Owner 



Nat'l. Reps. 
RA — TEL 

James E. Gordon, Gen. Mgr. 420 Lexington Ave. Hk 

New York City 



WNOE 

^O-A 50 ' 000 WATTS DAYTIME — 5.000 WATTS NIGHTTIME 






§f- #r l 



*--.-■■- m tm 







. 



The leading market- l qs Angeles 

County's food sales are the highest in the 
nation . . . $1,220,244,000. per year. In 
fact, Los Angeles County's volume of food 
sales is greater than the combined dollar 
value of such sales in the home counties of 
Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Baltimore and 
Atlanta. There are 6,950 outlets for food 
store products in Los Angeles County. 

For a bigger share of the nation's biggest 
food market, be sure your storv is told on . . . 

The leading station- knx is the 

most-listened-to station in Los Angeles. Says 
Pulse : KNX is first in twelve out of the total 
of eighteen one- hour time periods, Monday 
through Friday, including one first-place 
tie . . . and first in total rated time periods. 



KNX 



LOS ANGELES 
50,000 WATTS 

COLUMBIA OWNED 



Sources: 

Sales Management , May 190 
Cali/orniu Slate Board o/ Euuulizution 
Pulse, January- February I9f>0 




Represented by RADIO SALES 



WHO LOOKS WHERE? 

I Continued from page 31) 

the way in which they were derived. 
As one New York TV representative 
confided to sponsor the other day. 
"Sets still piled up in the warehouses 
are added to the pie in some areas." 

Is anything being done ahout a bet- 
ter set count? 

Actually, there is. The Radio Man- 
ufacturers' Association has started to 
break down figures for set shipments 
on a county-by-county basis. This is a 
good move, as far as it goes. But the 
RMA does not cover all counties in 
TV markets; nor do all of its members 



cooperate in regional breakdowns of 
set shipments. 

Moreover, RMA figures can't tell 
anything about the number of sets al- 
ready installed. In fact, until the cen- 
sus report is published next year, there 
won't be any really reliable basis on 
which to estimate the county-by-countv 
location of sets in the country today. 

Up till a short time ago, as was men- 
tioned earlier, advertisers bought TV 
out of curiosity, or just to insure a 
place on the bandwagon. They never 
stopped to worry about the logic. The 
case of one big regional advertiser is 
not typical — but it is indicative. 

This advertiser, a user of network 



40 




KPRC-TV 

formerly KLEE-TV 

„,/»fh TV show 
A three-day mammoth " 
H ,„ formally dedrcate KPRC 
July 3, 4, and 5 

featuring i" P^ " ' * ' 

RED INGLE 

and his natural seven 

CAROL BRUCE . «• «g« 

and a large cast ot ta> 



tie* 



m 



Star 



hi 






^KPRC-TV is affiliated with KPRC and 

The Houston Post. The same ^ h 
standards that have distinguished KPRC 
sta i j The Houston Post 

for 25 years, and The » ou . the 

for 6 6 years, will now be brought . 
field of television through KPRC 
Houston's pioneer television station 



KPRC-TV 

Serving Houston and Texas' 

famous Gold Coast 

jack Harris, General Manager 

Lamar Hotel, Houston 



radio, came to the network one dav 
with a proposal to drop radio entire- 
ly. He wanted to buy the 38 TV sta- 
tions which lay within his distribution 
area. When the network raised the 
rather academic question of what he 
would do with the 42% of his distribu- 
tion area not covered by TV, the 
would-be TV advertiser blushed and 
headed back to his local golf course. 

Few TV sponsors were this badlv 
stricken with fever for the new medi- 
um at even the high point of its nov- 
elty stage; but most TV sponsors were 
ready to plunk down their dollars with- 
out too much exposure to statistical 
sales pitches. Tighter competition, 
however, is causing more and more 
users of TV to check closely the dis- 
tribution of their TV coverage in or- 
der to coordinate it more carefully with 
other advertising and promotion. In 
addition, there's a trend among listen- 
ers to be selective about viewing. This 
adds to the need for specific coverage 
data. 

There's one significant difference be- 
tween radio and TV coverage in multi- 
station markets, incidentally. Different 
radio stations show wide variation in 
coverage areas because of differences 
in power. But all TV stations in a 
market are assumed to cover approxi- 
mately the same area. 

Because differences between station 
coverage are so much less in TV than 
in radio, a BMB-lype study isn't as 
vital for TV as it is for radio. When 
the time is ripe for such a study it will 
probably be done as part of a BMB- 
type study for radio. It's felt, also, 
that it'll be some time before program 
competition and station loyalties are 
developed to a point that would justify 
the cost of a study to analyze these 
factors. 

What's next in order are more com- 
plete efforts by individual stations to 
supplement the new RMA data on 
county-by-county set distribution. Ad- 
vertisers who want to make exacting 
use of the medium will put the neces- 
sary push behind such fact gathering. 

They'll be asking: 

"How many sets are there in X 
township?" 

"How main of the lower income 
neighborhood families have sets?" 

"Can 1 reach a worthwhile number 
of people 60 miles away?" 

They won't be satisfied much longer 
with today's blanket answers. * * * 

SPONSOR 




TV Directory No. 11 
July 1, 1950 



PUBLISHED BY TELEVISION DIGEST • 151? CONNECTICUT AVE., N. W. • WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 




CONTENTS 

• Television Networks: Rates, Personnel & Data 

• Television Stations: Rates, Personnel & Data 

With facilities, AM-Newspaper-Network affiliations 

• CPs Outstanding & Applications Pending 

Facilities granted or sought, AM- Newspaper- Network 
affiliations 

• Experimental Television Stations by Cities & 

States 

With wavelengths and powers assigned 

• Present FCC Allocations by Cities 

Allocations to first 140 markets, sales rank, population 

• Proposd FCC VHF-UHF Allocations by States & 

Cities 

Including suggested allocations for Canada, Mexico, 
Cuba 

• Television Program Sources 

Directory of owners, producers, syndicators of live and 
film material 

• Television Manufacturers & Receiving Sets 

Directory of manufacturers and their set lines, including 
Kit Manufacturers, Private Brands, Picture Tube Manu- 
facturers, Station Equipment Manufacturers, Transmitter 
Equipment Manufacturers 

• TV-Radio Set Production, Monthly Statistics 

• Trade Associations, Labor Unions, Research Firms 

• National Sales Representatives of TV Stations 

Including branch offices and list of stations represented 

• Number of Television Sets-ln-Use by Areas 

• Map of TV Network Routes 

In service and due during 1950-51 



Next edition of TELEVISION RATES & 
FACTBOOK (No. 11) will be ready for 
distribution on or about July 1, 1950. 

Our TV FACTB00KS have become the stand- 
ard reference guide for the television 
industry... an indispensable working 
tool for TV executives* 

Note the table of contents at the left. 
Here are basic facts and figures on the 
rapidly growing TV industry, compiled 
and assembled in one convenient volume . 
It can save you countless hours of 
valuable time, give you information 
you need, quickly, accurately and 
completely. 

Price of the Fact book is $5. Use the 
coupon below to order your copy today. 
You may attach your check or we'll 
bill you later. 

— Robert Cadel 
Business Manager 



/et^/m^aeJt^HnH Att-m ..«>.» 



USE COUPON TO ORDER YOUR FACTBOOK 



Television Digest 

1519 Connecticut Ave., N. W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 

Please send me copies of July, 1950 Television Rates & Factbook ($5.00 each). 

□ Check enclosed □ Bill company Q Bill me 

NAME _.._ 



COMPANY 

ADDRESS 

CITY AND ZONE 



STATE 



J 



TIME BUYERS 
AGREE... •!" 



a Whale * 
of a / 

Buy/\i 



5000 watts DAY 

lOOOwatts NIGHT 
Directional 

San Antonio's Oldest 
Music and News Station 



h For joe & Co. 




TELEPHONE SHOWS 

{Continued from page 23) 

fying the first tune after a phone con- 
testant fails. But no studio contestant 
is allowed to try for the jackpot prize. 

A close competitor of Stop the Mu- 
sic is Sing It Again. This CBS show, 
produced by Lester Gottlieb, makes 
from 11 to 13 calls every Saturday 
from 10:00 to 11:00 p.m. Instead of 
a "Mystery Melody," Sing It Again 
has a "Phantom Voice." Interestingly 
enough, this giveaway show has just 
slashed its prizes drastically. The cu- 
mulative jackpot is out altogether, with 
a uniform prize of $10,000 worth of 
merchandise and $5,000 given in cash 
instead. Lucky winners formerly re- 
ceived $25,000 in merchandise, $25,- 
000 in cash. What effect, if any, this 
cut has on Sing It Again s future pop- 
ularity should answer conclusively the 
question of whether giveaway or en- 
tertainment is most important on net- 
work quiz shows. 

Network sponsors can afford a rela- 
tively big talent bill. Both Sing It 
Again and Slop the Music have several 
good vocalists, a large orchestra, and 
razor-sharp masters-of-ceremonies. One 
consolation: competent Bert Parks and 
Dan Seymour are well-paid, but draw 
nowhere near the salary of a Jack Ben- 
ny, Arthur Godfrey, or Eddie Cantor. 
Package cost of Stop the Music to ra- 
dio sponsors Speidel Co. and Trimount 
Clothing Co. is $3,750 per quarter- 
hour. Sing It Again costs Carter Prod- 
ucts and Sterling Drug Co. $3,550 per 
15-minute segment. 

The network phone quizzes have 
been joined recently by straight audi- 
ence participations which have started 
using the telephone as a fillip to radio 
listening. Mutuals Queen for a Day 
last month began to call prospective 
"Queen" candidates at home from a 
list of post-card applications. The re- 
corded conversations are then played 
on the air. The studio audience votes 
for both in-person candidates and re- 
corded telephone ones. 

Irene Beasley s Grand Slam on CBS 
was one of the first audience partici- 
pation shows. Miss Beasley aims at a 
friendly, family-type program. She, 
too, recently began giving listeners a 
peek into the "corners of our national 
living room" by telephone. Each week 
one call is made to someone in the 48 
states who has submitted a question to 
the show. Miss Beasley and Continen- 
tal Baking Co. think this weekly call 



promotes the personal touch they are 
after. 

The success of telephone shows on 
the networks is matched by the popu- 
larity of the local station offerings. The 
local stations develop their own shows 
or buy syndicated telephone quizzes. 
Grandaddy of all the syndicated shows 
is Tello-Test, handled by Radio Fea- 
tures, Inc., 75 East Wacker Drive, Chi- 
cago. After seven years of operation, 
Tello-Test is out in front in 100 mar- 
kets, with Hoopers ranging from 8.6 
in Hartford, Conn., to 20.3 in Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. Its format is the sim- 
plest in the business : call people on the 
phone and ask a question. What keeps 
the show on top is the type of ques- 
tion and the window-dressing they get. 
Here is the Tello-Test recipe for whip- 
ping up a tasty question: 

1. The answer must be "findable" 
in some standard reference. 

2. Every question has a single, non- 
variable answer. 

3. Appeal of the question is univer- 
sal. 



SELL SORP! 




LANK-WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS, Inc. 
113 W. 57th ST., NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

Network i'atitre Programs at jCocal Station Cost 



42 



SPONSOR 



4. Questions are provocative, blend 
the familiar with the unknown. 

5. Each poser must have entertain- 
ment and/or educational value. 

6. Questions mustn't offend or be 
"touchy." 

7. They must have infinite variet\ . 

Here is an example of the copy tech- 
nique that lifts Tello-Test far above the 
amateur technique: "The big story in 
journalism isn't always in screaming 
headlines on the front page. Some- 
times it's behind the newspaper man 
who quietly attains the little things of 
life . . . such a person for example, as 
our man-in-question. If you know the 
answer, you'll "scoop" the town . . . 

and earn $ ! So tell me: 'Who 

founded the first successful one-cent 
daily newspaper in the United 
States?' " 

The Carnegie Library in Pittsburgh 
used to shrink from answering ques- 
tions like this for the local KDKA Tel- 
lo-Test program. After their eight-per- 
son staff had struggled manfully with 
half a dozen quiz programs simultane- 
ously for a few weeks, they stopped an- 
swering all but the Tello-Test queries. 
The library supplies the answer given 
them by KDKA because it spotlights 
their telephone reference service. 

Philadelphia's public library went 
through similar agony, now posts the 
answer on a card in the reference 
room. WIP, the Philadelphia station 
carrying Tello-Test, proved how im- 
portant the program's entertainment 
content really is. The station invited 
20,000 families with unlisted phones to 
send in their names and numbers so 
that they, too, might be called. Re- 
sponse to this appeal over the air 
brought in 3,644 unlisted telephone 
numbers from listeners who previously 
had no hope of being called. 

The WOR, New York, edition of 
Tello-Test is run by Bruce Eliott and 
Dan McCullough, whose five years ex- 
perience with a daily 15-minute slot 
has taught them plenty. Just recently 
WOR moved them to a half-hour seg- 
ment, upped their prizes to a starting 
one of $1,000 in merchandise, with 
weekly increases of $1,000 up to a 
maximum jackpot of $5,000. 

Bruce and Dan quickly discovered 
that listeners kept careful check on 
who they called and where contestants 
lived. Too many calls to one telephone 
exchange, or too few to a certain na- 
tionality group brought immediate 
protests. A careful scheduling system 




INCREASE YOUR SALES 

in the $400,000,000.00 
Norfolk Metropolitan Market 

with WTAR and WTAR-TV 

Sales Management says the Norfolk Metropolitan Market — Norfolk, 
Portsmouth, Newport News, Virginia — racked up $442,721,000.00" 
in retail sales in '49. Did you get your share? You can with WTAR 
and WTAR-TV. 

WTAR delivers more listeners-per-dollar than any other combina- 
tion of local stations. Hooperatings show that most of the people in 
the Norfolk Metropolitan Market listen most of the time to WTAR. 

WTAR-TV, on the air since April 2nd, is the first and only tele- 
vision service in this largest Virginia Market. An inter-connected 
NBC, CBS and ABC Television affiliate, plus outstanding local pro- 
gramming with RCA Mobile Unit and the modern facilities of a new 
$500,000.00 Radio and Television Center. 

Mate the mighty potential of the big, eager, and able-to-buy 
Norfolk Metropolitan Market with the dominant selling power of 
WTAR and WTAR-TV and your sales will soar. Ask your Petry office, 
or write us for proof. 



njfflfe 



WTAR-TV 



Norfolk, Virginia 



*Sales Management Survey of Buying Power, 1950 

NBC Affiliate 

5,000 Watts Day and Night - AM 

Inter-Connected NBC, CBS and ABC Affiliate-TV 

Nationally Represented by EDWARD PETRY & CO., Inc. 



3 JULY 1950 



43 



they developed eliminated most com- 
plaints. 

Each call Bruce and Dan make takes 
about a minute-and-a-half : 30 seconds 
to establish who they are, 30 seconds 
waiting for an answer, and 30 seconds 
to get untangled and hang up. Brief 
personal questions add interest, but too 
much of this talk brings demands to 
"make more calls." Lulls are filled 
with casual by-play between Bruce and 
Dan — Dan's young son provides mate- 
rial. 

The transcribed commercials are 
handled gently, but without formality. 



Bruce Eliot, an amateur vocalist, leads 
into the Lydia Pinkham commercial by 
trying to match its beginning musical 
note. Another participation on their 
15-minute show got this approach: 
"It's been a rugged morning here — on- 
ly two calls completed — better relax 
and have a cup of G. Washington Cof- 
fee." Silver Dust and Arrid got simi- 
lar treatment on the show. 

An off-shoot of Tello-Test is another 
WOR program run by Bruce and Dan : 
Tele-Kid Test. Also handled by Radio 
Features, Inc., this weekly half-hour 
show on Saturday mornings caters to 



Winston-Salem's 




Station 



Saturates North Carolina's 
GOLDEN TRIANGLE 



WINSTON- 
SALEM 



GREENSBORO 



313,600 
People 




$449,956,000 
Buying Income 



HIGH POINT 



No. 1 Market in the Souths No. 1 State 

Your FIRST and BEST Buy! 



Affiliated 
with 

NBC 



(J) WINSTON-SALEM (J) 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY YEAR 



Represented 

by 
HEADLEY- 
REED CO. 



kids under 16 years of age. Contestants 
are chosen from a list of 60,000 boys 
and girls who wrote in telling why they 
would like to be called. 

Two unusual features make the pro- 
gram noteworthy. First, the children's 
half of the conversation is broadcast 
too. A beeper and split-second tran- 
scription satisfy FCC regulations on 
broadcasting both sides of a telephone 
call. Second, the VIM Stores in New 
York use the program to sell television 
sets! Their success has been due to a 
large double-audience: kids and their 
parents, who help them answer. The 
unsophisticated answers of young con- 
testants add to the show's appeal. Right 
after the South Amboy munitions ex- 
plosion, Bruce and Dan called a con- 
testant in the stricken town, got an ex- 
citing first-hand tale of the tragedy. 

Contestants answer two questions. 
The first one is easy, carries with it a 
bicycle for boys, a Fred Astaire ball- 
room dancing course for girls. An- 
swering the second and harder ques- 
tion brings the lucky winner a jackpot 
built up by $5 in war savings stamps 
for each incorrect answer. 

One of the few syndicated quiz 
games which still require the audience 
to call the station is Tune-O. This mu- 
sical variation of bingo is owned by 
Richard H. Ullman, Inc., 295 Delaware 
Ave., Buffalo; has had phenomenal 
success. Sponsors have been enthusi- 
astic because of its close merchandis- 
ing tie-in: Tune-0 cards must be ob- 
tained at the sponsor's store. Each 
card looks exactly like the standard 
bingo card, with 25 numbered boxes. 
The numbers correspond to the title 
of a tune, of which there are usually 
250 listed on the card. As each tune 
is played, listeners identify it and mark 
off the corresponding number. When 
five in a row are so marked, the listen- 
er dashes to his phone and calls the 
station. 

Tune-0 recently did a strong sales 
job for the Crowgey Sausage Co., Kel- 
lysville, West Virginia. A big part of 
their advertising campaign was the 
sponsorship of a 15-minute Monday 
through Friday Tune-0 program on 
WJLS, Beckley, West Virginia, and on 
WLOG in Logan. Otto Whittaker, ac- 
count executive of Houck & Co. in Ro- 
anoke, Va., describes what happened: 
"The stations gave Tune-0 dozens of 
free promotional plugs. WJLS wrote 
letters to Crowgey grocers, played the 
show up big in their regular promo- 
tional mailout sheet, and sent their 



44 



SPONSOR 



men personally to call on Crowgey 
grocers and explain Tune-O. We used 
newspaper ads, counter cards, and pos- 
ters urging Mrs. Housewife to play 
Crowgey's Musical Tune-O. . . ." 

Weekly prizes of merchandise worth 
$100 were given out. George Kamen, 
Inc., merchandise consultants, supplied 
cigarette lighters, blankets, hats, a host 
of attractive items at a cost of only $15 
per $100 retail value. Promotional 
plugs made up the difference for sup- 
pliers of the prizes. 

According to Whittaker: "Sales jet- 
ted as though they had been waiting 
for a signal. The Crowgeys told us 
their sales were among the highest they 
had ever had." Three weeks later 
Tune-O was put into five more mar- 
kets. Trucks are being added to the 
company's fleet, new accounts have 
started, and routes are serviced twice 
a week instead of once. 

There are other syndicated radio fea- 
tures with varying formats. Know 
Your America combines the quiz ap- 
peal with a patriotic motif. Telephone 
contestants are invited to answer ques- 
tions based on a short historical vign- 
ette. W. E. Long Company, 188 W. 
Randolph St., Chicago, has been han- 
dling this feature for six years. Dale 
Mclntyre, former General Motors pub- 
lic relations man, is master of ceremo- 
nies for the popular Detroit version on 
WJR. Program opens with a pledge 
to the flag, goes on to inspirational 
music and comment, and is climaxed 
by the short description of some event 
in America's history. The program 
ends with a pledge to God, the UN, 
America, and American industry. Win- 
ners receive a portable radio, as do 
those contributors whose subjects are 
used for the vignette. 

W. E. Long Co. also syndicates Do 
You Know the Answer? and People 
Know Everything. Over 30 stations 
use Do You Know the Answer?, a 
simple show which can be adapted to 
any length from five minutes upward. 
Announcer asks phone contestants: 
"Do you know the answer?" and, to 
win, the contestant repeats a simple 
statement included in the sponsor's pro- 
motion. Deposits are built up by fail- 
ure to answer correctly. 

People Know Everything asks tele- 
phone contestants questions which 
have been mailed in by the public. If 
either one of the two persons called 
answers the question correctly, both 
contestant and questioner split the de- 
posit. People without telephones are 



thereby able to compete, too, by mak- 
ing up questions. 

Hal Tate Radio Productions of 831 
S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, syndicates 
Who's Talking?, a show similar to the 
network program Sing It Again. Over 
20 stations use "mystery voice" record- 
ings of 100-odd celebrities like Basil 
Rathbone, Hoagy Carmichael, Ray 
Bolger, and Bennett Cerf. Listeners try 
to unravel the transcribed poetic clues 
read off by the celebrities. As con- 
testants who are called on the tele- 
phone fail to identify the mystery 
voice, additional clues are given, up to 
a full set of six. One interesting "ex- 
tra" provided by Tate: sets of "mys- 
tery photographs" of the celebrity 
wearing a mask. Placed in the spon- 
sor's store, they create traffic, help 
strengthen sponsor identification. 

Recently a straight bingo-type pro- 
gram was put out by the I. F. I. Ad- 
vertising Co., Duluth, Minn. New 
twist : Players fill in their own num- 
bers on the "RADIO" form, then send 
a duplicate to the station. If they 
score, listeners call up immediately to 
be checked. Station Manager Ulbrich 
of WDMJ, Marquette, Mich., reports 
that the two-hour a week show has 
piled up 7,000 returns in the first three 
weeks. 

Syndicated shows like these have 
been tested for listener appeal and pos- 
sible violation of the anti-lottery law; 
they're probably the easiest to handle. 
But many local stations work up sim- 
ple "home-made'' telephone quiz games 
that work wonders. KASI in Ames, 
la. has been running a 15-minute Tele- 
quiz for the past year-and-a-half. The 
local public library compiles questions 
of state and national interest, gets its 
reward in publicity. Names are picked 
at random from phone books in the 
station's primary area. After a recent 
contest on the program, Super Valu 
Stores, the sponsor, discovered 2,500 
pounds of Red Rooster Coffee had been 
gobbled up instead of the usual 800. 

Here are more "home-made" local 
shows in capsule form : 

Borden's Birthday Party on WICC, 
Bridgeport, Conn. From a list of cards 
received, two names are chosen. The 
first phone call is made to a person 
celebrating his birthday, the second to 
someone at random. Prizes are a cake 
with the winner's name on it, bouquet 
of flowers, and a supply of Borden 
Company milk products. Hooperating 
after three months: 13.0. 

Golden Anniversaries on KFSA, 



HERE IS THE 
COMPANY YOU 
KEEP ON K-NUZ 



Nabisco Milk Bone Dog Food 

Exchange Orangeade Base 

Exchange Lemonade Base 

Nucoa Oleo Margarine 

Skippy Peanut Butter 

Southern Select Beer 

Hav-a-Tampa Cigars 

Robert Hall Clothes 

Interstate Theatres 

Griffin Shoe Polish 

O. J. Beauty Lotion 

Ladies Home Journal 

White House Rice 

Grand Prize Beer 

Selznick Releases 

Red Arrow Drugs 

Best Mayonnaise 

Scott's Emulsion 

Tender Leaf Tea 

Sloan's Liniment 

Lone Star Beer 

Fairmaid Bread 

Kool Cigarettes 

Kam Dog Food 

Life Magazine 

Holsum Bread 

Crosley Radio 

NBC Bread 

Realemon 

Stanback 

Fly-Cide 

Pine-Sol 

Shinola 

Rit 

35 New Contracts in May 

133 New Contracts January 
thru May 



No. I Availability — 

"Today's Hits", II a.m.-l2 noon 
Sundays, Hooper* 4.6 No. I in 
Houston 

"West's best" 1:30-1:45 p.m. Mon. 
thru Fri. Hooper* 4.2 No. I in 
Houston 

*Hooper Winter-Spring Report — 
December 1949, thru April 1950. 



CAU, WIRE OR WRITE 

FORJOE: NAT. REP. 

DAVE MORRIS, MGR. 

CE-8801 

k-nuz 

(KAY-NEWS) 

9th Floor Sconlon Bldg. 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



3 JULY 1950 



45 



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Y. 



RECORDING • PROCESSING 
PRESSING 

ou get the kind of serv- 
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Sales Studio, Dept. 7-C: 

120 East 23rd Street 
New York 10, New York 

MU 9-0500 

445 North Lake Shore Drive 

Chicago 11, Illinois 

Whitehall 4-3215 

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Hollywood 38, California 

Hillside 5171 

You'll find useful facts in 

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Send for it today! 



"Efotuiite 




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Fort Smith. Ark. As a boost to its ba- 
sic purpose (acknowledging 50th wed- 
ding anniversaries ) . listeners are asked 
to give the exact year in which a de- 
scribed event took place. The station 
is called by contestants, has been asked 
to discontinue by the phone company 
due to jammed exchanges. 

Women s Club of the Air on KGGM, 
Aubuquerque, N. M. From a list of 
7.500 members, 12 names are chosen 
each day to receive prizes. To collect, 
the member must call the studio with- 
in one minute of the time her name is 
broadcast. In addition, a mystery tune 
is played twice a day and the first 
member or non-member to call the sta- 
tion and give its name wins a prize. 
The stations three trunk lines are 
swamped regularly. 

Mystery Tune on CHUM, Toronto, 
Canada. Ten times a day at varying 
moments, announcers call someone at 
random and ask for the name of a se- 
lection being played on the station. 
Tunes are easily identifiable by their 
lyrics, serve to encourage listening con- 
tinuousl) to CHUM. Wrong answers 
add a dollar to the jackpot, which has 
gone as high as $500. 

Giveaway on WWJ, Detroit. This 
half-hour show across the board calls 
phone numbers at random, offers 
prizes for correct answers. One lonely 
lady of 71 who was contacted by the 
program told her story, received 350 
cheering letters and cards from listen- 
ers. 

Name That Tune on WCKY, Cincin- 
nati. After obtaining a card at a Dot 
Food Store, housewives complete a cir- 
cle with their own name and three 
friends. If the show's MC calls any 
one of the four and gets an answer 
of "hello,'" the circle is broken. If the 
contestant names the product adver- 
tised on the program, she and her 
three friends on the card all win 
prizes. 

There is only one big draw-back to 
giveaways right now: the Federal Com- 
munications Commission is out to 
lighten up the rules. In August, 1948 
it issued its interpretation of the fed- 
eral lottery law. Broadcasters strenu- 
ously objected, said the FCC had no 
right to interpret the law and that their 
interpretation was incorrect. After 
hearings and legal tangling in the 
courts, the case became deadlocked. As 
it stands today, the Commission may 
m>l put its rules into effect until a fed- 
eral court says so. The hearing on this 



begins in the fall of 1950 and the ver- 
dict will undoubtedly be appealed to 
the U. S. Supreme Court. 

Here are the rules which the FCC 
would like observed, on pain of not 
renewing a station's license: 

Any scheme will be considered a 
lottery if: 

1. Winners are required to furnish 
any money or thing of value, or 
are required to possess any prod- 
uct sold by the sponsor of a pro- 
gram. 

2. Winners must be listening or 
watching the program to win. 

3. Winners are asked to answer a 
question whose answer was given 
over the same station. Even help 
in answering the question or pre- 
vious broadcast of the question 
alone will be considered illegal. 

4. Winners must answer the phone 
in a prescribed way (such as giv- 
ing the sponsors name or prod- 
uct), provided this way of an- 
swering has been broadcast over 
the station airing the program. 

The networks are concerned about 
this development, not alone because it 
threatens big shows like Stop the Mu- 
sic, but because it sets a dangerous 
precedent. If the rules are permitted 
to take effect man) small stations, and 
a substantial number of large ones, will 
find their biggest-pulling programs 
forced off the air. And sponsors will 
thereby lose one of the best advertis- 
ing devices ever invented. * * * 

Telephone shows are a big factor in 
television programing as well. A sec- 
ond article on telephone shows will be 
devoted exclusively to TV and will ap- 
pear in the 31 July issue of sponsor. 



HOW BORDEN'S DOES IT 

[Continued from page 27 I 

vertising thinking. The knowhow of 
local officials of Borden's is beim: 
brought into play. In one town, the 
president of the local Borden operation 
for years had been supplementing the 
company's national radio efforts with 
his own local radio campaign. He was 
able to aid agency and New York ex- 
ecutives of Borden's when they made a 
program selection recently. 

In many of the program selections, 
ideas of New \ork-based executives 
have been changed through contact 
with local people. 



46 



SPONSOR 




willie wish, disk jockey 

Willie WISH is a disk jockey extraordinary for H.F.C.* 

The popular late evening record show, 

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Willie WISH and Ozzie Osborne combine their talents 

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Just one more proof that Willie Wish is a powerful puller 

in Indianapolis right up to sign off. 

* Household Finance Corporation 



that powerful puller in Indianapolis . . . 





wjsh 



OF INDIANAPOLIS 

affiliated with AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY 

GEORGE J. HIGGINS, General Manager 
FREE & PETERS, National Representatives 



snBoimw 



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"Bee Bee" King, The Beale Street 
Blues Boy, has had two %-hours daily 
on WDIA for more than two years. 
He's one more good reason why 
WDIA is pleasing advertisers* with 
amazing sales increases among our 
own special audience — the intensely 
loyal Negroes who make up 49% of 
the population of our primary area. 

•Slmonlz *Ex-Lax 

•Sealtest 'Kelloggs All-Bran 

"Penlck & Ford 'Dentyne 

HOOPER RADIO AUDIENCE INDEX 
City: Memphis. Tenn. December. I949THRU April. 1950 

Index Sets WDIA A B C D E F 

T.R.T.P. 21.6 26.6 28 - 8 20 - 8 l3 - 5 l24 9e 34 

"WDIA, Memphis, Tennessee, Bert 
Ferguson, Mngr., Harold Walker, 
Com'l Mngr., John E. Pearson, Rep." 



One story they tell up in Borden's 
Madison Avenue, New York, head- 
quarters is that a certain local execu- 
tive turned down all of the national 
office's suggestions in favor of his own 
ideas. Since the company's decentral- 
ization policy provides for such cases, 
the New York ideas were discarded in 
favor of the local man's. But at about 
that time the local man died, and his 
successor decided to go along with rec- 
ommendations from New York. 

On 27 March, Borden launched in 
New York a new local radio show; it 
provides one example of what Borden's 
is driving at in local markets. The 
show, Let Yourself Go, is aired over 
WNEW, 12-12:30 p.m., Monday-Fri- 
day. This program differs from many 
of Borden's spot buys in that it's tailor- 
made — custom-fitted for Borden, so to 
speak, while others were ready-to-wear. 
And it's the biggest single spot buy 
Borden has made to date. 

Once it was noised around New York 
last winter that the Borden company 
was in the market for a local show, 
virtually every station in town made a 
pitch for the business — Y & R's time- 
buyers reportedly had "a stack of au- 
dition records a foot high." WNEW, 
an independent operation which is 
nothing if not alert, got the plum — a 
39- week contract with 13- week options. 
The WNEW show is an excellent 
proving ground for Borden's current 
theories on program content and han- 
dling of commercials, and its progress 
will be studied closely by the company 
— as well as by other thoughtful ad- 
vertisers. 

In planning its major show in the 
New York market, Borden has been 
shooting for a happy blend of the pres- 
tige of network-caliber entertainment, 
and the "intimacy" of local radio at its 
best. WNEW came up with an offering 
that obviously has satisfied the sensi- 
tive Borden palate. Borden's Let Your- 
self Go can compete on equal terms 
with many high-priced network pro- 
ductions. 

Instead of the three minutes of com- 
mercial time a weekly network show 
would give them, Borden's can lux- 
uriate in three minutes a day for com- 
mercials on WNEW, or 15 minutes a 
week. A different product can be 
plugged each day, in opening, middle, 
and closing commercials of a minute 
apiece. These are handled in a relaxed 
style by Allvn Edwards, who doubles 
as MC of the WNEW show. The rest 



of the cast includes pianist Teddy Wil- 
son, singer Peggy Ann Ellis, and Roy 
Ross and his WNEW orchestra. 

The music is limited to familiar pop 
tunes, and the whole show is calculated 
to fall restfully on the ear of the busv 
housewife. For good commercial mea- 
sure, Peggy Ann Ellis always singles a 
jingle or two about something or other 
that rhymes with the Borden product 
being plugged that day. 

But Let Yourself Go is only part of 
the New York picture. In addition. 
Borden's national advertising depart- 
ment has a six-day-a-week participa- 
tion on the Jack Sterling morning show 
on WCBS, backed up by an afternoon 
pitch three days a week by Galen 
Drake on the same outlet. Five-a-week 
participants on Martha Deane, WOR. 
and Nancy Craig, WJZ, get Borden's 
across to the all-woman audience and, 
shifting to the classical music listeners, 
the company has nine spots a week on 
WQXR. 

Almost without exception, Borden's 
is spotting its radio efforts in daytime 
hours. TV takes over at night. The 
company has bought top TV spot avail- 
abilities in every important market. 
Borden's strategists, who have been 
heavily influenced by the Hooper fig- 
ures on nighttime viewing in major 
TV cities are congratulating them- 
selves for having bought up TV spot 
availabilities months back. TV an- 
nouncements are on film and feature 
Elsie the cow puppet sequences. * * * 



SOFT DRINKS ON AIR 

(Continued from page 21) 

often than would seem sound for good 
advertising. But with one or more 
shows on at a time, Coca-Cola con- 
sistently has stayed with network pro- 
graming. Local level radio also gets 
a good play from the company and 
its various bottlers. For example, the 
Louisiana Coca-Cola Bottling Com- 
pany recently signed a five year con- 
tract with WDSU in New Orleans. 
This extensive local campaign will fea- 
ture the Cisco Kid series, using two 
half-hour programs a week. 

Although 15 to 20 Coke bottlers are 
now using TV spots, the parent com- 
pany has done nothing about network 
TV. It is reported that this initial 
smattering of TV will up the budget 
this year by 15% to 20%. The par- 



48 



SPONSOR 



ent company is, however, now consid- 
ering TV on a large scale. They are 
reviewing about 14 different ideas; 
but no decision as to the type of pro- 
gram has been reached. (It's reported 
that Coca-Cola holds the TV rights 
for Edgar Bergen. I It seems likely 
that the company will follow on TV 
the same "pleasant" pattern of pro- 
graming that it has used on radio: 
musical, variety or drama shows and 
certainly no give-aways, soap operas, 
or mysteries. 

Pepsi-Cola has also been dabbling 
in TV. The company and its affiliates 
use TV spots in about 25 cities. In 
New York alone, the company uses 
over 10 a week. As is done on radio, 
the popular jingle "Pepsi-Cola Hits 
The Spot" is used on TV, with the 
added punch of dancing Pepsi bot- 
tles. According to the company, the 
extra expense for TV was not taken 
from the radio budget; however, more 
might have gone into radio had it not 
been for TV. 

In radio, Pepsi is using both spot 
and network. Their advertising is set 
up to hit the family group, and with 
that in mind they have sponsored for 
the past year and a half, David Hard- 
ing, Counterspy over ABC. The half- 
hour twice weekly show is aired over 
nearly 300 stations at a time cost of 
about $1,500,000 annually. The com- 
pany has always been a heavy user of 
spots, sharing the cost with the bot- 
tlers, but has not increased them to 
any great extent within the last three 
year. In 1948 Pepsi spent about $2,- 
000,000 for advertising; since then 
they have added the network radio and 
TV spots and have increased the over- 
all ad budget. 

Pepsi-Cola's total sales in 1948 were 
$36,237,751 and just about the same 
last year. Margin of profit tumbled, 
however. Pepsi is now being sold at 
six cents in some parts of the country. 
The company with its 500 bottlers ap- 
parently has not suffered dire conse- 
quences. 

Royal Crown (Nehi), on the other 
hand, seems to be still trying to hold 
to the nickel price, and not too suc- 
cessfully. The company reports that 
a majority of its 450 bottlers are op- 
erating at the old price, and that no 
price raise is presently contemplated. 
But there is also a report that the 
Pacific Coast area is now up to 90c a 
case as compared to a previous 80c. 
It is here on the Pacific Coast that the 
price raise trend for the industry as a 



• Advertising that Moves More 
Merchandise per Dollar 
Invested is Bound to be 
the One that Gives You 
the Most Coverage for 
the Least Money! 




• Covers a 17,000,000 
Population Area 
in 5 States at the 
Lowest rate of any 
Major Station in 
this Region! 

"It's The DETROIT Area's Greater Buy!" 

Guardian Bldg. • Detroit 26 

Adam J. Younc, Jr., Inc., Nat'l Rep. • J. E. Campeau, President 



„ 



3 JULY 1950 



49 



whole is taking firm footing. 

The recent financial figures for the 
company indicate that they can use the 
price raise as well as the others in the 
industry. Their sales in 1947, $9,- 
068,000, increased to S9,107,000 in 
1948; their reported profits, however, 
decreased from $1,464,000 in 1947 to 
$1,119,000 in 1948. 

Their advertising situation is like 
that of three years ago, at which time 
they were using spot announcements 
on some 250 stations; they reportedly 
spent about $1,000,000 on advertis- 
ing in 1948. Each bottler is now av- 
eraging about 10 spots weekly, gener- 
ally on a cooperative cost basis with 
the parent company. No national net- 
work radio is used, primarily because 
of distribution holes. 

The company's pitch is toward the 
kid market. Repetitive use is made of 
popular singing commercials like 
"When you're tired and feeling blue, 
RC makes you feel like new." Times 
of broadcasting are set to bring in a 
large kid audience, along with adults. 
The appeal is further carried through 
youth books, comics and teen-age club 
developments. 



RC, along with the others, is be- 
ginning to move into TV. Spots are 
now being used in a few major cities, 
including Los Angeles, Chicago and 
Louisville. A charade-type broadcast 
is aired in Los Angeles, and the com- 
pany reports good response to it. 
Equally satisfying to them is a tele- 
phone quiz game conducted with Jim 
Ameche in Chicago. There are indica- 
tions that the company will increase its 
TV spot efforts. 

One of the loudest pops heard in 
the industry today is coming from 
Canada Dry. It's not only packing 
the punch in advertising, with W. S. 
Brown (vice president in charge of ad- 
vertising) doing the swinging, but it's 
boldly pioneering the price raise trend. 
(See Mr. Sponsor, page 14.) 

Canada Dry is no longer pushed as 
a luxury-type mixer. The company is 
now all-out for mass consumption. 
They're getting the point across that 
ginger ale won't kill you if you don't 
put whiskey in it. In 1947, it had six 
licensees and 21 company-owned plants 
with about 39,000.000 people within 
its distribution area. Today it has 
100 licensees and 29 company-owned 



COMING! 




TRIBUNE TOWER OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Represented Nationally by Burn-Smith 



plants serving about 83,000,000 peo- 
ple. For the six months ending 31 
March 1950, the company showed net 
sales of $25,176,728, with net income 
of $912,663. For the same period in 
1949, net sales were $23,320,380 and 
net income $867,956. Net sales for 
the fiscal year 1949 were $51,477,000. 

Canada Dry's advertising is in line 
with its over-all expansions. The com- 
pany will spend about $3,000,000 this 
year for advertising: $1,600,000 al- 
lotted to company-owned plants, about 
$800,000 to home office advertising, 
about $600,000 as aid for licensees. 
The bottlers' advertising costs are gen- 
erally shared with the parent company. 

Radio off and on has had a large 
slice of Canada Dry's budget. In the 
past, the company has sponsored the 
Jack Bennry show, Information Please 
and the Meredith Wilson show; inci- 
dentally, Canada Dry was the first 
sponsor each had. The company with 
its licensees is currently spending 
about $110,000 annually on local ra- 
dio, spot and participation. They use 
75 stations and average 750 announce- 
ments weekly. They are on no na- 
tional radio network at the present 
time. 

In April 1949, the company came 
out with another advertising first — 
first in the industry to pick up a TV 
network production. Super Circus on 
ABC. The 52-week half-hour show 
costs the company over $7,000 a week, 
about $2,000 of that is chalked off to 
talent charges. The annual cost is 
over $364,000. The company has 
built its other advertising around the 
TV show. Magazine ads and point-of- 
sale display material are directly tied- 
! in. 

The show started on 10 stations and 
has now expanded to 30 cities. Cana- 
da Dry's fieldmen. bottlers and deal- 
ers, are enthusiastic because the visual 
aspects of the show can be keyed to 
point-of-sale display material. Show 
recognition almost becomes synony- 
mous with brand identification. 

Most of the plugging is done on the 
ginger ale split (small-sized bottle! 
rather than on the larger sizes. (It is 
reported that Canada Dry controls 
about 35% of this larger bottled drink 
in this country.) In the industry gen- 
erally, the small bottle accounts for 
80% to 90' v of the total production. 

When Canada Dry decided to jump 
into this competitive lion's den. it also 



50 



SPONSOR 



decided to do something about rising 
costs and the nickel squeeze. It 
upped its prices. Not only didn't com- 
petition cooperate, some cut prices, in 
what seemed like a move to freeze 
Canada Dry out. The company was 
forced to bring its price back down. 

But the situation has changed con- 
siderably. Canada Dry has again 
raised its prices, and many others are 
not following suit. So far, the upped 
price is meeting with success among 
consumers. Bottlers and retailers can 
do as they wish, but in most cases the 
five-cent splits have gone up to six 
cents. 

A few other national companies 
have fallen in line with the price raise. 

One firm whose business has gone 
flat is Dr. Pepper; it has suffered a 
severe decline in sales and profits. The 
firm has traditionally been tight with 
advertising money. Sales dropped in 
1947 from $8,992,000 to $6,851,000 in 
1948; profits went from $1,046,000 to 
$686,000. The unit volume for last 
year approximated that for 1948. The 
company recently began pouring $250,- 
000, in addition to its regular budget, 
into promotion of its newly-designed 
bottle cap. TV spots are expected to 
get a heavy share of this, especially in 
the South. 

Local independent bottlers are nu- 
merous, and often do a good high- 
volume local job. They account, how- 
ever, for but a small amount of the 
total soft drinks business. An unusual 
operation is that of the All-American 
Drinks Company which produces Joe 
Louis Punch. Almost a "paper-office" 
in operation, the company has an ex- 
tract made up exclusively for them, 
and then distributes it to franchised 
bottlers. In backing up the bottlers, the 
company spends about $125,000 an- 
nually for advertising; approximately 
18% of this goes to radio. There are 
many other similar outfits which use 
radio locally. 

All in all, the soft drinks industry is 
in the midst of a topsy-turvy price ad- 
justment. The trend is up, in line with 
higher costs. Until the adjustment is 
worked out, the pinch on advertising 
will continune. Once the nickel squeeze 
is off, advertising should forge ahead 
as never before, and television as well 
as AM radio will probably get a tre- 
mendous amount of the money al- 
lotted. • • • 



MINUTES: NEW MEASURE 

{Continued from page 25) 

wears off a bit, they look for different 
types of programs than before. For 
example: Evening dramatic programs 
on radio are listened to 36% of the 
time in radio-only homes; 17' < of the 
time in TV-plus-radio homes. 

These are some of the high-points 
in the Sindlinger survey; many of the 
details are equally important to spon- 
sors and their agencies. One question 
si ill remains: what is so different 



about the Sindlinger method from 
others being used and why are his re- 
sults at odds with other findings? 

The Hooper method involves mak- 
ing a maximum of 8,400 phone calls 
in each "single unit" market over a 
two-month period. Altogether, 100 
cities are covered for radio, 40 for 
TV. From the phone calls are com- 
puted monthly "share of audience" 
percentages and "sets in use" figures. 
As popularity measurements for indi- 
vidual programs, these results are 
valuable. But using them to see how 



There's Far Too Much Talk 
about the "Decline of Radio" 

1. KWL today has a GREATER 
SHARE of Audience than EVER 
BEFORE! 

2. KWL Sales are FAR AHEAD 
of AHY January thru May 
period in our 76 year history! 

3. We WINK that is true of 
ANY ALERT, CLuUencthAcnoN 
station. We KNOW it is TRUE 
with KWL! 

* 

KTUL.CBS-.PIus "Know How" 
on the Local Level ... in Tulsa 



AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 
National Representative 



JOHN ESAU 
Vice-President - General Manager 



3 JULY 1950 



51 



radio and TV listenership match up 
is risky. Here is what Sindlinger dis- 
covered in Philadelphia about tele- 
phone ownership: 

1. 90% of TV homes have a phone. 

2. 69% of radio-only homes own a 
phone. 

Speaking for Philadelphia, at least, 
Hooper operators will call 21% more 
people with television sets than they 
should, giving TV too big a share. 

Further, Sindlinger shows in detail 
how "share of audience" figures can 
be confusing. With shifting bases of 
listener-viewers, inevitable in "share 
of audience" computations, 20% could 
refer to 100 or 1,000 people. It's also 
easy to mistakenly assume from the 
figures that every minute gained by 
TV viewing necessarily cuts into ra- 
dio listening. As Sindlinger has found, 
more than twice as much of the time 
now devoted to television comes from 
activities other than radio. With two 
broadcast media instead of just one, 
the problem of how big the audience 
pie is for each medium at a particular 
time becomes crucial. Sindlinger's in- 
dividual measurement on a time scale 
is the most clear-cut answer. 



SELL THE 
COTTON BELT 

WITH THE 
"COTTON BELT GROUP" 



WGVM 
KDMS 
KTFS 



GREENVILLE, MISS. 
lOOO Watts- 1260 Kc 

EL DORADO, ARK. 
1000 watts- 1290 Kc 

TEXARKANA, 
TEX.-ARK. 250 watts- 
1400 Kc 



Sell over a million* folks in the Delta — 
South Arkansas and East Texas— by use 
of the Cotton Belt Group. One low rate 
gives you blanket "not secondary" cov- 
erage in this multi-million dollar mar- 
ket! 

^Primary .5mv 



COTTON • OIL • LUMBER 
AGRICULTURE 

"Tho South'* Billion $ Market" 

Write— Wiro— Phono 
Cotton Bolt Croup 
c/oKTFS 
Toxarkana, Tox.-Ark. 



Nielsen's method in theory is simi- 
lar to the Sindlinger one. His fixed 
sample of 1,500 people dotting the 
country provide Audimeters with lis- 
tening and viewing data. Besides the 
popularity-type ratings, the Nielsen or- 
ganization compares the radio sets it 
measures and television on a time ba- 
sis somewhat similar to the measuring 
stick Sindlinger uses. Two criticisms 
that researchers have aimed at Niel- 
sen's method, however: 

1. A sample of 1.500 people for the 
whole country is too small to per- 
mit accurate sub-sampling — as, 
for instance, investigating only 
members of the sample with TV 
sets for over a year. Then, too, 
turn-over is about 20% among 
sample members, raising the 
question of whether the sample 
can be completely representative 
when so many people are re- 
placed regularly. 

2. Another point: is every secon- 
dary set in sample homes cov- 
ered by an Audimeter? Nielsen 
figures put the average number 
of Audimeters in his sample 
households at 1.3. But Sind- 
linger finds that his 1.7 sets per 
home of a year ago have risen 
to 1.9. Radio listening in TV 
homes is largely done on sec- 
ondary sets; leave them uncov- 
ered and you miss considerable 
radio listening. 

As the man says, you spends your 
money and takes your choice. What 
causes a station or sponsor to use a 
particular research service is some- 
times the complexion of its figures. 
The organization which can deliver the 
most attractive results often has the 
most clients. One caution is always 
in order: research results are no bet- 
ter than the methods which produce 
them and the understanding of them. 
Unless a client still believes in black 
magic, he should know that the an- 
swers to complex questions cannot be 
drawn from a hat, or without expense. 

With the burden of choosing the 
best advertising buy getting tougher 
every month for sponsors, some sim- 
plified way of evaluating them is over- 
due. Sindlinger believes the 24-hour 
system, which he has been plugging 
for years, is the best way out of the 
present media jungle. One thing is cer- 
tain : only general acceptance of the 
time yardstick will prove him right or 
wrong. 



310 Madison 



(Continued from page 6) 

your kind offer of the TV dictionary 
in booklet form. We would also like 
to buy two extra copies. Not knowing 
how much they are, I presume the best 
thing would be to send them collect. 
Will vou please handle? 

Don L. Baxter 

Vice President 

W ilhelm-Laughlin-W ilson 
& Associates 

Dallas 



Thanks for your TV dictionary. It's 
good. 

Clarence B. Goshorn 
Chairman of the Board 
Benton & Boivles Inc. 
Neiv York 



We would very much appreciate re- 
ceiving two of the TV dictionaries 
which you offer to subscribers of your 
magazine to cover the two subscrip- 
tions coming to this office to S. Ram- 
say Lees and Miss G. Race. 

We are enclosing a money order for 
$2.00 for which we would ask you to 
send us eight more copies of this TV 
dictionary. 

Needless to say we find sponsor 
very informative and we are only sorry 
that your articles do not include more 
Canadian information. 

S. Ramsay Lees 
Ruthrauff & Ryan Inc. 
Toronto 



Do you have the complete TV dic- 
tionary in a condensed form, or re- 
prints thereof? If so, your subscriber 
requests one copy. You may bill us ac- 
cordingly. 

Jason N. Silton 
Silton Brothers Inc. 
Boston 



• • • 



Please send us one copy of the TV 
dictionary as published in installments 
in recent issues of sponsor. 

Margaret Kemp 

Radio Program Coordinator 

General Mills Inc. 

Minneapolis 



52 



SPONSOR 




order today 



SPONSOR Publications Inc. 

510 Madison Ave., New York 22 

Please send me new leather binder holding 13 issues of 
SPONSOR at cost of $4. 

Name 



Firm. 



-Title- 



Street- 
City_ 



Zone- 



State- 



|~| Two binders holding 26 issues $7 
[~| Payment enclosed ] Bill me later 



The new binder will easily hold a full six- 
month supply of issues. It is built of strong, 
durable material and opens flat to put every 
page within easy reach. Stamped in gold. 

1949 Index to stories in SPONSOR included 
with each purchase of new binder. 



A few bound volumes of the 1949 SPONSOR issues still available at $12.50 




GROWING 

GROWING 

GROWN 




MORNING PERIOD" 



PLUS... 

a 14.8 Over-all Audience 
Increase Since 1949 

ANOTHER BONUS 
FOR ADVERTISERS... 

Special merchandising 
department for extra 
promotion of sales. 

•January, February, 1950 Hooper 



WABB 



AM 5.000 Watts 
FM 50,000 Watts 



ABC and MUTUAL 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
THE MOBILE PRESS REGISTER 

NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY 
THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



510 \ Madison 



Our hat is off to you again. Your 
latest promotion piece — "TV diction- 
ary for Sponsor's" is further proof 
that you fellows again hit the bull's 
eye. 

Could we please take advantage of 
this offer to have 25 more copies at 
cost. 

James Sondheim 

Promotion Director 

WATV 

Newark, New Jersey 

• Answering the hundreds of reader inquiries 
regarding SPONSOR'S TV Dictionary, compiled 
by Herbert True. SPONSOR replies that copies 
still are available free to subscribers (limit, one). 
Additional copies are 1-4 25c each; 5-49 ]5e 
each; 50 or more 10c each. 



TV FILMS STORY 

I imagine your mail is frequently 
cluttered with letters of complaint 
about this or that. " This is not one of 
those. 

I do want to express my apprecia- 
tion to you and your staff for their 
very generous mention of Official Tele- 
vision and its plans of action in your 
recent issue. We do appreciate this 
public notice of the efforts we are mak- 
ing to serve stations and advertisers 
with more effective programing mate- 
rials. 

The representative you sent to call 
on us with reference to the article was 
extremely courteous and we were glad 
to cooperate in his efforts to get facts 
as we will at any time sponsor wants 
to run a story involving programs on 
film. 

It isn't fair to close this note with- 
out saying that we thoroughly enjoy 
every issue and look forward to its 
arrival. 

W. W. Black 
Vice President 
Official Television Inc. 
New York 



GODFREY AND BEETHOVEN 

My mind had already been made up 
about sending you a note and my com- 
pliments for the delightful essay in the 
issue of 5 June, Irving Marder's "The 
great Godfrey." 

Then, turning a few pages, the fa- 
miliar design of the WABF Program 
Magazine caught my eye, and now I 
also want to send my compliments and 
thanks for the article it accompanied, 
"Is Beethoven commercial?" We're 



grateful to you, not only for including 
us in your story, but for the sense you 
make. 

Thanks a lot. 

William Geib 
Program Director 
WABF 
Neiv York 



We are delighted with your article 
"Is Beethoven Commercial?" in th e5 
June issue of sponsor. 

Your comprehensive reporting pro- 
vides those of us who are broadcasting 
"good music" with excellent material 
to add to our presentation to adver- 
tisers. 

If reprints of your article are avail- 
able, we would like very much to have 
50 copies. If such large quantities are 
not available, we would sincerely ap- 
preciate your sending as many as you 
can spare. 

In addition we would like to have a 
dozen reprint copies of your exception- 
ally fine article "Reading vs. listening" 
report by Dr. Lazarsfeld. 

Horace W. Gross 
Commercial Manager 
WFMZ 
Allen town 



HOUSE OF COMMONS READER 

Please send me a copy of your issue 

dated 22 May. 1950. I am enclosing 

50c to cover the cost of this magazine. 

A. L. Smith, M.P. 

House of Commons 

Ottawa, Canada 



LOUISVILLE'S MR. SPONSOR 

I would like a copy of SPONSOR 
which was published in the last two 
or three months. 

I am interested in an article in this 
publication in which you discussed 
advertising programs for a Savings 
and Loan Association. The principal 
media used by this particular adver- 
tiser was radio. I realize this is not 
much to go on, however, I hope you 
will be able to find this issue for me. 
I like your magazine very much. It 
has proven very helpful in many in- 
stances. 

T. Frank Smith, Jr 

Manager 

KVAL 

Broivnsville, Texas 

The article to which Mr. Smith refers is titled 
"Louisville's Mr. Sponsor." It ran 2 January 
1950. 



54 



SPONSOR 



READING VS. LISTENING 

I notice from your 5 June SPONSOR 
that a few copies of Lazarsfeld "Read- 
ing vs. listening" study are still avail- 
able. I would appreciate it very much 
if I could have two copies of the re- 
print. 

Betty W. Haddix 
Timebuyer 
The Biow Co. 
San Francisco 

• Thr "Reading vs. listening" study will be 
sent free to subscribers as long as the supply 
lasts. 



RADIO IS GETTING BIGGER 

"Radio Is Getting Bigger" is just 
what I've been looking for. Will it be 
possible to get 250 additional copies? 
If so, what cost per copy? 

Jim Hairgrove 

Manager 

KFRD 

Rosenberg, Texas 

• Radio's role as an accelerating advertising 
medium is emphasized in the 32-page "Radio Is 
Cetting Bigger. " Single copies are available on 
request to subscribers. Additional copies, $1 each. 



WANNA 

SPIN 
A WEB 
AROUND 

SPIDER (Ky-) ? 

lf you're b»S6 e a t le ^ia b0 S U pide r 

ia them tnar for 

Instead *e bc£ our i Trading 

ina area* eale8 £ "We almost 

« iio ( lX^p^ ras f the 

as mU ^h e State combined! 
rest of thecal f 

touisviti-rs 



NEWSPAPERS' USE OF TV 

We would be interested in obtaining 
any information you may have regard- 
ing newspapers' use of television. 

Miss Jan Gilbert 
Radio-TV Director 
Harold Cabot & Co 
Boston 

• Reader Gilbert will be pleased to know that 
use of TV by newspapers is the subject of a 
forthcoming SPOINSOR study. 



FARM FACTS HANDBOOK 

Recently we received a copy of your 
Farm Facts Handbook. Since we and 
our affiliates sponsor a number of 
radio programs in Indiana, we were 
naturally quite interested in a booklet 
devoted entirely to farm radio. I was 
a little surprised that you failed to 
mention the radio research done by 
Dr. C. H. Sandage who is currently at 
the University of Illinois. Dr. Sand- 
age did much of the pioneer work on 
the diary method of measuring radio 
listening, and while at Miami Univer- 
sity made several radio diary studies 
both in rural and urban areas. At Har- 
vard University he wrote a book 
titled Radio Advertising For Retailers. 
Just in case you have not seen the 
results of some of his later work, I am 
enclosing a bulletin from the Univer- 
sity of Illinois which describes some 
radio research done in rural and urban 
areas in Central Illinois. In addition 
to this published material, they cur- 
rently have underway at the Univer- 
sity a rather extensive series of radio 
diary studies. One of the purposes is 
to measure the effect of a station's 
program on various programs. 

We have found the results of Dr. 
Sandage's study quite useful in devel- 
oping our own programing and I 
merely wished to call his work to your 
attention if you did not already know 
of it. 

Richard E. Smoker 
Indiana Farm Bureau 
Cooperative Association 
Indianapolis 



V, S, BECKER PRODUCTIONS 
AVAILABLE 

Women's appeal, musicals, serials, dramas, 
comedies and children's shows completely 
packaged for television. Representing talent. 
562 - 5th Ave., N. Y. Luxemberg: 2-1040 



ask 

John Hum & Co. 

about the 

Havens & Martin 

STATIONS 

IN 

RICHMOND 

WMI!(i-A»' 

MOD-™ 
WTVR'v 

First Stations of Virginia 



BMI 

Scripts About Music 

It's the successful sponsor who 
ties together his programming 
of listenable music with a fresh, 
bright and timely commentary. 

And hundreds of alert program 
producers everywhere are cash- 
ing in on BMI's "scripts about 
Music." 

BMI's Continuity Department 
serves its Radio and TV licen- 
sees with a regular series of 
distinctive, effective program 
scripts calling for recorded 
music. 

Ask your Station Representative 
for further details regarding 

According to the Record 

THE INSIDE STORY 
SPOTLIGHT ON A STAR 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 



NEW YORK 



HOLLYWOOD 



3 JULY 1950 



55 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Is reading obsolete? 

When Andrew Heiskell, publisher of 
Life, labelled his 12 June speech at 
MIT "Is reading obsolete?" he was 
touching on a point that is sorely vex- 
ing magazine and newspaper people. 

It's all linked with the general con- 
fusion engendered by television's pow- 
er to draw the family into its orbit. 

Of course reading isn't obsolete, any 
more than radio is obsolete. And Mr. 
Heiskell doesn't assume for a minute 
that it is. 

The printed media fraternity is 
worried because initial studies are 



showing that actually more of tele- 
vision's time is coming from other 
activities than radio. For example, 
the Sindlinger study reported in this 
issue (see page 24) reveals that in the 
peak evening viewing hours in Phila- 
delphia more than twice as much time 
is garnered by television from read- 
ing, theater going, card playing, etc., 
as from radio. 

The printed media weren't worried 
as long as the radio-hysteria period 
held forth. But now that advertisers 
are taking a more scientific look and 
the finger points at magazines and 
newspapers, you can look for a period 
of printed media unrest. 

But that will pass, too. Magazines 
and newspapers will remain important 
media. We believe they'll continue to 
grow. At the same time, radio is get- 
ting bigger, too. 

The sponsor wants to know 

When sponsor introduced its first 
FALL FACTS Issue in July 1947 
there was plenty of reason for a sin- 
gle issue that would help sponsors and 
their advertising agencies get oriented 
with respect to fall buying. 

The first issue had its place. So had 
the second, and the third. But as we 
buzz around getting set for our fourth 



a great truth dawns. 

At this stage in radio and TV's 
progress, trends are developing over- 
night. New situations of note are de- 
veloping overnight. Problems are 
popping up like dandelions. And, by 
and large, business is wonderful. 

The fourth FALL FACTS Issue will 
mirror what's happening in July, what 
we think will happen in September. 
Out of the maze of questions staring a 
broadcast buyer in the eyes, our job 
is to ferret out the most meaningful 
ones, supply the most meaningful an- 
swers. Included will be such tidbits 
as what will be available, time and 
programwise, on radio and TV net- 
works this fall; the outlook on rates; 
a special section titled "Air Power" 
which provides tangible evidence of 
the sales effectiveness of radio and 
television; the reasons behind the spot 
boom; the trend toward marginal ra- 
dio time; a big foldout TV map in- 
cluding many of the most vital facts 
that every sponsor requires. These are 
just a sample. 

How well sponsor interprets the 
trends, provides the answers, furnishes 
the tools remains to be seen. But this 
we know: the need for a FALL FACTS 
briefing was never greater; we've never 
worked harder. 



Applause 



Radio: sales Samson 

Like the bottled genii in the Aladdin 
story, hard-hitting proofs of the re- 
markable selling impact of radio are 
coming forth at the very time when 
radio needs them most. 

In Seattle, Washington, the newly- 
formed Advertising Research Bureau, 
Inc., has devised an ingeniously use- 
ful technique to determine the effec- 
tiveness of advertising media right at 
point-of-sale. In the first 16 pilot tests, 
each of which compared newspaper 
and radio on a dollar for dollar basis, 
radio outstripped newspapers nearly 
two to one in the number of people 
pulled into the stores; nearly three to 
one in dollar volume sales. In every 
case but one radio outpulled newspa- 
pers. 

ARBI is extending its point-of-sale 
survey method nationwide, under the 



guidance of Research Analyst Joseph 
B. Ward. Advertisers and agencies 
will soon have an opportunity to decide 
whether radio is as powerful a selling 
force in other areas as in the North- 
west, sponsor has checked the first 
tests and is impressed with their im- 
partiality, equality, and astonishing 
simplicity. Not least impressive are 
the down-to-earth comments by cus- 
tomers (immediately following pur- 
chase) on why newspaper or radio 
pulled them in. 

At the AFA Convention in Detroit 
late in May, J. S. Stolzoff, vice presi- 
dent of Cramer-Krasselt, Milwaukee, 
and a leading purchaser of both TV 
and radio advertising, pointed out 
that those in the know are using radio 
increasingly as a direct-sales and near- 
direct sales tool. He foresees an ex- 
pansion of radio advertising, particu- 
larly on a local level. Said Mr. Stol- 



zoff in Detroit: 

"It is today, more than at any pre- 
vious time in history, a powerful, flexi- 
ble medium with a sales power limited 
only by the ingenuity of the people 
who use it. The biggest radio success 
stories are still to be written." 

sponsor, going about its daily job 
of analyzing the effectiveness of the air 
media, knows that radio is getting big- 
ger. What has obscured a clear view 
of radios true dimensions? Why must 
it fight to convince advertisers that its 
force goes on unabated? Perhaps the 
maze of ratings and coverage analyses 
are partially responsible. We suspect 
that the terrifically potent salesman- 
ship of the Bureau of Advertising of 
ANPA has more than a little to do 
with it. 

But you can't obscure the spotlight 
of truth. And it's shining on radio 
now. 



56 



SPONSOR 



KMBC-KFRM v 



W/'nsAg 



Wtti 



/ 



The Spring 1950 Kansas City Primary Trade Area Survey — a coincidental survey 
of over 80,000 telephone interviews in one week by Conlan — just off the press — 
shows The Team even further ahead of its nearest competitor than a year ago! 
It is one of the most comprehensive listener studies ever made — and one of the 
most revealing. 

Together with the Fall 1949 Kansas City Primary Trade Area Survey — an aided 
recall survey made through 2,122 personal interviews at the 1949 Missouri State 
Fair, Kansas State Fair and the Kansas City American Royal — it provides irref- 
utable proof of The Team's outstanding leadership. Yes, current proof, not 
moth-ball evidence. 

The KMBC-KFRM Team 

with Coverage Equivalent to More than 

50,000 WATTS POWER! 

Yes, The Team covers an area far greater 
than KMBC alone, at its present location, 
could cover with 50,000 watts with the best 
directional antenna system that could be de- 
signed. With half-millivolt daytime contours 
tailored by Jansky & Bailey, America's fore- 
most radio engineers, to enable The Team to 
effectively cover Kansas City's vast trade ter- 
ritory (a rectangle — not a circle), The Team 
offers America's most economical radio cover- 
age. 

Contact KMBC-KFRM, or any Free & Peters 
"Colonel" for complete substantiating evidence. 




J«xas "N ' 
Daytime half-millivolt contours shown in black. 

THf TEAM AGAIN WINS HRSU 

Spring 1950 Kansas City Primary Trade Area 
Radio Survey, just completed, shows KMBC- 
KFRM far ahead of all other broadcasters try- 
ing to serve this area. 



MBC-KFRM 



OGRAMMED BY KMBC 








Long-established CBS clients like Liggett & Myers Pillsbury, 

Procter & Gamble, Philip Morris. William Wrigley- 
are increasing their CBS appropriations. 



New advertisers-some of them never in network radio 

before-are coming to CBS Names like Brock Candy. 
Carnation, Carter Products, Phillips Petroleum. 

Quaker Oats. Richfield Petroleum. Rosefield Packing. 



S^ 



B» 



1 



I 



.1- 



©H3 



«i* 



©^© 



©It, 



*:• 



e| «!»»:•:&? 



o « © zm 



■8gJ* 



•:« 



i 
I 



In I950's first four months. CBS was the only network to increase its billings. 



I 



In 1950, advertisers invest 
in on any other network. 





Fall Facts 
Issue: 1950 



122; 



PR/ 
NAT »AGU 

Y 






Is Spot Booming? 



see page 37 



Wht's 

The Fall C'ttlook 

By Industries? 



see pag, ?9 



Who Are 
The TV Reps? 



see page 90 



What 24 Points 

Should Sponsors 

Remember? 



see page 32 



Are Transcriptions 
Getting Better? 



see page 55 



Is Use Of 

■ ■ ■ ■ ■■■■ 

Marginal Time 
Increasing? 



Where And When 
Can I Buy TV? 



see page 107 



see TV map, page 33 



What Selling Proof 

Can Radio And TV 

Provide? 

see Air Power, page 47 



Will Unions Will Nighttime Are Radio Networks 

luddy TV Waters? Net Rates Decrease? Declining? 



see page 94 



see page 80 



see page 79 




FIRST 
STEP TO 
SALES 
IN RICHMOND 



Like the child that takes the first step 

and discovers it can walk, 

your first step in Richmond 

to discover the sales power of radio 

and television is to use 

the Havens and Martin stations. 

These pioneer NBC-programmed facilities 

have established an enviable history 

of listener loyalty in Virginia's first market. 

An advertising message on WMBG, WTVR, WCOD 

will give you maximum exploitation 

of your potential sales power 

in this high-effective-buying income area. 

Your nearest Blair man 
is anxious to tell you more. 



/ 



Havens & Martin Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 




Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
Represented nationally by 
John Blair & Company. 




JU 

NBC GEN 



TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



Fall, 1950 to 

mark sponsorship 

shift of some 

key programs 



Fa I 



spot campaigns 

to start earlier 

this year? 



Campaigns to 
watch this fall 



Pepsi-Cola and 
Biow relax long- 
standing aversion 
to transcriptions 



'TV Results" and 
"Radio Results" 



17 July, 1950 

You'll find most top radio network shows whose spon s ors have made the 
shift to daytime or TV still on the nighttime air come October and 
November. But under new sponsorship. "Fibber McGee & Molly," dropped 
by S. C. Johnson, was snapped up by Pet Milk. "The Fat Man," which 
produced so well for Norwich Pharmacal, will go to work for Camel 
cigarettes next fall. With competitive bid for business being stepped 
up in many lines, proven packages, especially those reasonably priced, 
should find ready sponsors. 

-SR- 

Competition for time slots on desirable stations is intense this sum- 
mer. Representatives and stations predict that, as a result, spot cam- 
paign planning is earlier this year. One West Coast observer notes 
that cold remedy advertisers, among shrewdest of spot users, are 
scrambling for availabilities weeks earlier than usual. 

-SR- 

There's plenty of money, but consumers are getting choosier about 
where it goes. That creates competitive situations in many fields 
worth watching this fall. Some worth keeping your eye on are (1) 
battle of cigarette brands, especially if federal bill to sharply re- 
duce tax of cigarettes selling for 12c a pack or under goes through; 
(2) margarine vs. margarine, and margarine vs. butter; (3) battle of 
the automobiles. Production has stepped up to point where tougher 
competitive techniques are inevitable. Kaiser-Frazer will be in there 
slugging; (4) battle of the toothpastes. Will Colgate hold its domi- 
nant position? Will Pepsodent, the former leader, move up from third? 
(5) Consumption of bread is going down. What strategy will bakers 
use? (6) Production of milk is up, but so are prices. Dairies will 
be doing more advertising to meet this situation. 

-SR- 

When Pepsi-C o la, through Biow, rec ently announ ced test of Golden Gate 
Quartet transcription series (sold by Transcription Sales, Inc.) over 
WDIA, Memphis, history was being made. Both Pepsi and agency had 
long-standing aversion to e.t.'s; this marks first exception. If suc- 
cessful, series will be extended to 31 markets and local bottlers will 
be urged to participate. WDIA is Negro audience station, indicates 
Pepsi "soft-spot" strategy in fight to top Coca-Cola. 

-SR- 

There's no shortage of TV or radio result stories t hese days. A few 
years ago the advertiser wanting sales effectiveness data on broadcast 
advertising found it in very short supply; today a note to SPONSOR 
will bring facts and figures on most kinds of businesses. 



SPONSOK, Volume 1. No 1".. 17 Jub 1950. Published biweekly by srONSOK Publications inc., at 3110 Klin Ave., Baltimore 11. Md. Executive. Editorial, Circulation Office 
510 Madison Ave., New York 2-2 ss a yeai in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter _'!i January 1949 at Baltimore, Mil. postofflce under Act 8 March 1879. 



RE PORTS... SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR Rf 



More tape being 
used by networks 



A word of caution 

about nighttime 

radio 



MBS and NBC 

doing most mood 

programing 

among nets 



All eyes on 
Lever strategy 



'Deals" waning, 
but . . . 



Unobtrusively, tape recordings are bee oming m or e in vogue among net- 
work advertisers. This fall plenty of net programs will be tape re- 
corded. Tape got its start on networks when inferior quality of 
e.t.'s almost lost ABC the Bing Crosby Philco series several seasons 
back. ABC hastily bought 24 tape recorders and saved account. Most 
individual stations have tape recorders now; by turn of year, Tape 
Network, Inc. (coalition of stations geared to give tape reproductions 
on fast schedule) may be open for business. 

-SR- 

Agencies who have s e en media scares come and go send out word of cau- 
tion about deserting night radio because of TV effect. They reason: 
there will be 7,000,000 to 8, 000, COO sets this fall. But there are 
nearly 90,000,000 radio sets. Sure, potent TV is having effect on 
nighttime listening. But it isn't knocking out 90, 000, 000-set medium. 
If you're not in TV areas, you have nothing to worry about. If you 
are, nighttime radio may still be your answer, providing you find out 
how to program to capture the available radio audience. 

-SR- 

ABC, which used to feature a domin ant programing mood each night, 
isn't worrying about block these days. CBS, which started mood pro- 
graming, isn't either. MBS is big mood programer with mystery- ad- 
venture on Monday and Tuesday, draiia and variety Wednesday, drama and 
adventure Thursday, musical variety Friday, audience participation' Sat- 
urday. MBS has audience participations from 1:30 to 4:30 and kid 
skeins from 5:30-6:00 weekdays. NBC features music Monday nights, 
comedy Tuesday and Saturday. Soap operas are big theme on NBC, CBS, 
and ABC weekday afternoons. Mood situation won't be far different 
this fall from previous spring. 

-SR- 

Am ong upcoming air campaigns, none will at trac t more attention than 
those for Lever Brothers this fall. It's certain that new management 
will make strenuous bid to regain ground lost to Procter and Gamble 
and Colgate-Palmolive-Peet during past few years. Root of Lever trou- 
ble was very late start in synthetic detergent field. Aside from 
soaps and detergents, there's rebuilding to do on Pepsodent, Rayve 
Shampoo, and Hair Wave Sets. Jelke Good Luck Margarine will be ac- 
tive. It'll be an exciting fall and winter for the Big Three . . . 
and for advertising agencies, national representatives, networks, and 
stations serving them. 

-SR- 

Although flurry of radio and TV "deals" by agencies and advertisers is 
diminishing, two recent ones involve Durkee Foods and Bulova dealers. 
Durkee deal, evidenced on Ohio stations particularly, gives station 
5% of money taken in monthly by local Durkee distributor in return for 
announcements. Bulova is strictly local deal devised first by Texas 
store that advertised watch at §1 down via mail, with station keeping 
half, dealer half of first installment. Thereafter, dealer keeps all. 
Plan spreading fast. Fritz Snyder, Bulova radio chief, knows of p.i. 
technique; to date finds no way to stop it. 

SPONSOR 



NO. 13 OF A SERIES 



m&*& 



„?*>&■■ 



v 



ROGERS HORNSBY 
In Batting,— 

WHEC 
In Rochester 



i OHO TIM* 



am*** 1 * 



preference W , te rer 

been topped since 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 



WHtC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 
Note WHEC's leadership morning, afternoon, evening: 





STATION 


STATION 


STATION 


STATION 


STATION 


STATION 




WHEC 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


MORNING 

8:00-12:00 Noon 
Monday through Fri. 


43.9 


17.2 


9.6 


6.6 


17.8 


3.1 


AFTERNOON 

12:00-6:00 P.M. 

Monday through Fri. 


38.2 


24.8 


7.9 


15.2 


9.6 


2.8 

Station 


EVENING 

6:00-10:30 P.M. 
Sunday through Sat. 


40.6 


27.7 

WINTER- 


8.0 

SPRING 


9.6 

1949-1950 


12.9 


Brood casts 

till Sunset 

Only 








HOOPERATING 








N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT- McKINNEY, Inc. New York, Chicago, LEE F. O'CONNELL CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



17 JULY 1950 



VOL 4 NO, 15 
17 JULY 1950 

Contents 

SPONSOR REPORTS 1 

510 MADISON 4 

QUERIES 12 

NEW AND RENEW 17 

MR. SPONSOR: GEORGE ABRAMS 20 

P.S. 22 

FALL FACTS DIGEST 27 

FALL FORECAST 29 

SPONSOR CHECKLIST 32 

TV MAP FOR SPONSORS 33 

SPOT RADIO 37 

AIR POWER (8-page section) 47 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 64 

NETWORK RADIO 79 

TV: NETWORK AND SPOT 87 

OVERALL 107 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 122 

APPLAUSE 122 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 
Executive. Editorial. Circulation, and Advertising Offices: 
510 Madison Ave., New York 22. N. Y. Telephone: Mur- 
ray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 360 N. Michigan Avenue. 
Telephone: Financial 1556. West Coast Office: 6087 Sunset 
Boulevard. lias Angeles. Telephone: Hillside 8311. Print- 
ing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscrip- 
tions: United States $8 a year, Canada and foreign $0. 
Single copies 50c. Printed in V. S. A. Address all 
correspondence to 510 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 
Copyright 1950. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn. Secretary-Treasur- 
er: Elaine Cooper Glenn. Managing Editor: Miles David. 
Senior Bditoi Frank M. Bannister, Irving Marder. As- 
sistant Editors: Erik II. Arctander, Fred Birnbaum, Arnold 
Alpert. Lila Lederman. Art Director: Howard Wechslcr. 
Vice-President Advertising: Norman Knight, Advertising 
Department: Edwin D. Cooper (West Coast Manager), 
i (.Southeast Manager) Beatrice Turner. Edna 

Vergin. John A. Kovchok. YOc President Business Mana- 
<i Bernard Piatt. Promotion Manager: M. ii. LoBlang. 
Circulation Department Ann Ostrow (Subscription Mana- 
ger). Emily Cutillo. i thet Slmonowitz Secretary to Pub- 
I i v::u ':: Shearman, "tin'' Manager: Olive Sherban. 




510 Madison 



COHEN HANDLES FITCH 

Confirming our telephone conversa- 
tion of last week, the advertising man- 
ager of the F. W. Fitch Division of 
The Grove Laboratories, Inc., our cli- 
ent, was surprised to read in the 22 
May issue of sponsor that Campbell- 
Mithun was listed as the agency for 
Fitch. 

Harry B. Cohen Advertising Com- 
pany. Inc.. has handled the advertising 
for Fitch since last July. 

Both the client and the agency real- 
ize that such a slip-up can occur very 
easily. However, the client has asked 
us to request that you print a correc- 
tion to indicate the correct agency rep- 
resentation. 

Mary Dunlavey 

Timebuyer 

Harry B. Cohen Advertising 

Neiv York 



FREE & PETERS SALES CLINIC 

Aside from the personal publicity 
you gave me in your "Applause" col- 
umn in your 19 June issue regarding 
the Free & Peters sales clinic, I also 
wanted to thank you for giving this 
the amount of space you did. I am 
sure Free & Peters stole the show on 
this clinic idea and they will use it to 
make their operation harder hitting. 
You can't go far wrong in commend- 
ing these kind of efforts. 

Louis J. Nelson 
Wade Advertising 
Chicago 



It was fine to see your editorial in 
your most recent issue regarding the 
sales clinic recently held by Free & 
Peters in Chicago. We are delighted 
to see that recognition is being given 
to the fact that radio and television 
station representatives have something 
important to contribute to industry 
discussions of basic issues affecting 
broadcasting stations, as well as to the 
fact that many representatives are in 
fact making that contribution to the 
industry. 

Many people in the industry fail to 
realize that the national sales repre- 
sentative has a truly national view- 
point of the industry and that from the 
representatives' vantage point an in- 



IOWA-NEBRASKA 

SALES 

are made by . . . 



KMA Audience 
Impact* 

Impact in. 140 rural counties of 
Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri and 
Kansas, — that's what KMA, 
Shenandoah, Iowa, offers. 

KMA Programming 

Experience 

25 years of broadcasting ex- 
perience means KMA com- 
pletely covers the rich rural 
Omaha-Des Moines market 
with programs farm and small- 
town dwellers like to hear. 

KMA Merchandising 
Cooperation 

KMA merchandises accounts: 
surveys its retail grocery and 
drug outlets ; informs all 
wholesalers, dealers, and dis- 
tributors of accounts on the 
air; publicizes programs and 
personalities who sell for ad- 
vertisers; displays advertisers' 
products in its Mayfair Audi- 
torium, where weekly hundreds 
of Midwest farmers are enter- 
tained. 

That's why your schedule must 
be on KMA to cover the rural 
Omaha-Des Moines market! 



KMA 

SHENANDOAH, IOWA 

Represented by 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



Ration SH*; 

.,_„ 7 days 



Under Management of 

MAY BROADCASTING CO. 

.Shenandoah, Iowa 



COME ON IN 

THE MARKETS FINE! 

The San Diego Market, that is! 



Retail Sales $729,000,000 * 
Industrial Payrolls $66,000,000 
Navy Payroll $97,000,000 
Farm Products $57,000,000 
World's largest tuna port 
Increase in Retail Sales 434% 
since 1940 



I 




IN FACT 



• • • 







San Diego — the *-**-»- 

nation's 26th 

market in population — has the high- 
est Retail Sales Index of any U. S. 
city in the first 40.** 

YES, THE SAN DIEGO MARKET'S 
FINE ... AND GETTING FINER! 

And Remember 

KCBQ— CBS is the only San Diego network 
station to increase in over-all Share-of-Audi- 
ence during 1949, with all other network 
affiliates taking a nosedive! 

Local and national spot advertisers buy frtore 
programs on KCBQ — CBS than. on any two 
other San Diego network stations combined! 



So when in San Diego . . . do as San Diegans do •' 

SELL WITH KCBQ 



*S. D. Chamber of Commerce 
"S.R.D.S. Consumer Markets 1949-1950 




Charles E. Salik, President 5000 WAT T S 



CBS 



17 JULY 1950 



■mmmnB 



gil|l|l||||||IIIIIIII!lll!IIIIIH 



Frequency 600 K C 

Power 5000 Watts 

Licensed to Operate 
Full Time 

Representative 
George P. Hollingbery 




(CBS) 

JAMESTOWN, N. DAK. 
FARCO, N. DAK. 



SUMMARY DATA — DAYTIME 



Percentage Levels: 


BMB 

County 

Units 


1949 

Radio 

Families 

11,120 

22,330 

34,560 

56,480 

109,660 

147,980 

172,390 

215,680 

291,590 


BMB Station 

Audience 

Families 

10,560 

20,240 

29,920 

44,040 

72,650 

89,900 

98,470 
108,720 
120,500 


90% and over 
80% and over 


5 

13 
23 
37 
54 
73 
85 
100 
119 


70% and over 

60% and over 


50% and over 

40% and over 


30% and over 

20% and over 


10% and ever 





BMB percentages indicate percent of Radio Families that comprise the 
weekly audience — All counties in which \0°7c or more Radio Families listen to 
KSJB at least once a week. 



Frequency 910 K C 

Power 1000 Watts 

Licensed to Operate 
Full Time 

Operated by the Jamestowr 
Broadcasting Company 




MINOT, N. DAK. 
(On Air August 1, 1950 



We offer general market information below, which is not intended to be interpreted as 
station KCJB coverage. 

Minot, North Dakota, is the third largest city in this state, and had the 
largest increase in population (1950 census) of any city in the state (32%) 

FIGURES BELOW INCLUDE AREA DESCRIBED AS 
MINOT RETAIL SALES ZONE: 

Population 133,662 

Radio Homes 33,415 

Retail Sales 37,459,000 

Bank Resources - in excess of $40,000,000 

(KCJB — MINOT, NORTH DAKOTA — Is Owned by Jamestown Broadcasting 
Company (KSJB) and can be purchased at reduced combination rates with KSJB) 

iiiiiiiiiiHM 



510, Madison 



dividual station in an individual mar- 
ket can survey the whole field and see 
how he is doing in comparison with 
other factors. The representative has 
access to much research material of 
varying kinds for widely different mar- 
kets and stations; he is in a position 
to view a variety of management and 
operating techniques among stations 
of all types; he is in a good position 
to render judgments on such impor- 
tant factors as programing, hased on 
his study of causes and effects in many 
places. And he can and should pass 
on this information to his stations, as 
Free & Peters did. 

As a matter of fact, we are doing 
the same thing ourselves. As a result 
of many, many months of study of the 
over-all spot broadcasting picture, tele- 
vision, and other factors, we have ar- 
rived at a number of fundamental con- 
clusions. We are applying those con- 
clusions to the circumstances that ex- 
ist in each of our markets, and then 
arriving at specific recommendations. 
When this point is reached, the station 
involved is asked to visit us especially 
for a meeting on the subject. 

We have so far held three such meet- 
ings. Another is in progress in New 
York now. and two more are sched- 
uled for Chicago this week. We feel 
that the results of the meetings thus 
far have been excellent — that we have 
a keener awareness of the station's 
problems and what it is trying to ac- 
complish in its own local market, and 
that the stations go back with a fresh 
viewpoint and a broader perspective 
on the whole industry, along with spe- 
cific recommendations from us on all 
programming and sales problems. 
John Blair 
President 
John Blair & Co. 
Ch icago 



We read with a good deal of inter- 
est of the recent Sales Clinic held by 
Free & Peters . . . and with particular 
interest your editorial in the 19 June 
issue, which closes with the observa- 
tion that this is the first sales clinic 
held by a representative since Petry 
did it in the early "40s. 

We'd like to raise a meek little voice 
from up here to say that Kettell-Car- 



SPONSOR 




adio's most loyal audience 

writes one WLS program 

207,000 letters 

in three months! 



JgS* 



Listener-Confidence and 
Acceptance Pay Off in Mail — 
and in Definite Sales Results 

TT Lo Stumpus, continuously bringing 
the largest daily response we have record 
of in Chicago radio, features the same 
kind of friendly voices, the same neigh- 
borly spirit and top quality talent that 
WLS listeners have come to expect when- 
ever they tune the 890 spot on their dials. 

WLS listeners know the products ad- 
vertised on this powerful participation 
program will be dependable, lor they 
have followed WLS advice for more 
than a quarter century. 

Main voting married couples, the 
heavy-spending age-group from whom so 
much of our mail comes, grew up listening 
to WLS in their family homes. Many were 
members of youth groups given special 
recognition by WLS . . . and it is only 
natural this lifelong listening habit carries 
over, for WLS has always programmed 
for the family. 

Stumpus is typical of the clean, whole- 
some fun we provide, just as School Time 
and Dinner Hell typify our service — and 
Stumpus response is typical of the way 
radio's most loyal audience . . . the sub- 
stantial family folks in 217 counties... 
respond to words from WLS and buy 
WLS-advertised products. Listener loyalty 
predicates advertising results. 



STIIMPim w ' 1 '' Captain Stubby and the Buccaneers is 
broadcast daily from 10 to 10:30 a.m., with 
advertising participation available at regular one-minute 
rates. For rates, availabilities and latest Midwest Nielsen 
figures on listenership and cost-per-thousand, call, wire or 
write SALES MANAGER, WLS, CHICAGO ~. 




890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, ABC NETWORK-REPRESENTED BY >\ JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



17 JULY 1950 



zoffimnmaHM 




vctntf m frowesi, ttetu/wi& a^fciiatioK 
and t(ffce& o£ man&efo 4&wed. ^ne 
oue t&caa t&eu ail &ave Ca common 
i& &ood 'TtttiMoqematt, ut&tc& auto- 

vatue& £ot tne audience, aadtofr 
culventi&iita vaiue& ion, you. 



^ 



H 



D 

REE & Jr ETERS, INC 

Pioneer Radio and Television Station Represerdatires 



Since 1M2 



ATLANTA 



DETROIT 



NEW YORK 

FT WORTH 



( HICAGO 

HOLLYWOOD 



SAX ERANCISCO 



EAST, SOUTHEAST 



WBZ-WBZA 


Boston-Springfield 


WGR 


Buffalo 


WMCA 


New York 


KYW 


Philadelphia 


KDKA 


Pittsburgh 


WFBL 


Syracuse 


WCSC 


Charleston, S. C. 


WIS 


Columbia, S. C. 


WGH 


Norfolk 


WPTF 


Raleigh 


WDBJ 


Roanoke 



NBC 


50,000 


CBS 


5,000 


IND. 


5,000 


NBC 


50,000 


NBC 


50,000 


CBS 


5,000 


CBS 


5,000 


NBC 


5,000 


ABC 


5,000 


NBC 


50,000 


CBS 


5,000 



MIDWEST, SOUTHWEST 



WHO 


Des Moines 


NBC 


50,000 


woe 


Davenport 


NBC 


5,000 


WDSM 


Duluth-Superior 


ABC 


5,000' 


WDAY 


Fargo 


NBC 


5,000 


WOWO 


Fort Wayne 


ABC 


10,000 


WISH 


Indianapolis 


ABC 


5,000 


KMBC-KFRM 


Kansas City 


CBS 


5,000 


WAVE 


Louisville 


NBC 


5,000 


WTCN 


Minneapolis-St. Paul 


ABC 


5,000 


KFAB 


Omaha 


CBS 


50,000 


WMBD 


Peoria 


CBS 


5,000 


KSD 


St. Louis 


NBC 


5,000 


KFDM 


Beaumont 


ABC 


5,000 


KRIS 


Corpus Christi 


NBC 


1,000 


WBAP 


Ft. Worth-Dallas 


NBC-ABC 


50,000 


KXYZ 


Houston 


ABC 


5,000 


KTSA 


San Antonio 


CBS 


5,000 



MOUNTAIN AND WEST 



KOB 


Albuquerque 


KDSH 


Boise 


KVOD 


Denver 


KGMB-KHBC 


Honolulu-Hilo 


KEX 


Portland, Ore. 


KIRO 


Seattle 



NBC 


50,000 


CBS 


5,000 


ABC 


5,000 


CBS 


5,000 


ABC 


50,000 


CBS 


50,000 



CP 



Here's the Sensational 

LOW-PRICED 
WESTERN 

That Should Be On Tour Station! 



FOR 3 YEARS'.^- 



PROVED 

RENEWED FOR 6 YEARS! 






Ife 



l&'^i 



AMERICA'S 
GREATEST SALESMAN! 

Pays off with the very 
first broadcast! 

Most Sensational Success Story 
Ever Offered for Local Sponsorship! 

Interstate Bakeries (Annual Gross Sales: Over 
$58,000,000) say: "The CISCO KID has certainly 
sold a lot of bread for us. We have never seen our sales 
force more enthusiastic. This applies to our grocers also. 
Enclosed find our renewal for 6 additional years." — Roy 
L. Nafziger, Pres. 

Sensational Promotion Campaign — from buttons to 
guns — is breaking traffic records! 

This low-priced _. 

Vi-Hour Western 
Adventure Program 
is available: 1-2-3 
times per week. 
Transcribed for lo- 
cal and regional 
sponsorship. Write, 
wire or phone for 
details. 



f&mi 



mm 



Z'«°«o* 



/ 



1^ 



J 



^y? 











510 Madison 



ter is presently laving plans for its 
fourth Sales Clinic to be held in the 
fall of 1950. 

We held our first Sales Clinic in 
March of 1949; and upon its success, 
adopted the idea of holding two such 
meetings annually. Although we rep- 
resent only 19 stations in New Eng- 
land, and are strictly Regional Repre- 
sentatives, the efficacy of such meet- 
ings is attested by the attendance. Our 
first meeting was attended by 39 radio 
station executives from those 19 sta- 
tions. The second meeting, held in 
November, 1949, had an attendance of 
51; and the third meeting, held in May 
of this year, was attended by 70 sta- 
tion men. 

So we know from experience that 
heavy dividends accrue from such 
Sales Clinics. 

Incidentally, may I say I think your 
magazine is doing a splendid job; is 
concrete and down-to-earth with real 
meat on its bones. Keep up the good 
work. 

Elmer Kettell 

Kettell-Carter 

Boston 



BAB'S MITCHELL ON NEWS 

sponsor, 19 June, is one of the best 
yet. 

I am delighted to note that BAB's 
comments on news were helpful to you 
in decorating your story "Tips to a 
news sponsor." 

I think some stations will take ex- 
ception to your suggestion that five 
minutes of news is enough and I am 
inclined to agree with them. I can 
remember from my experience at 
WTOP that we often programed 35 
minutes of news in a single 45-minute 
period and found that any attempt to 
cut this volume of news down was met 
by a loss in audience. Surely it makes 
better sense to assume that the qual- 
ity and not the quantity of the news 
presentation determines the fatigue 
point of the listener. 

Newspapermen deny radio's claims 
as America's preferred news medium 
on the grounds that radio talks in 
headlines only. Although I don't con- 
cede that point, it is certainly true 
that restricting the news to five minute 
capsules forces emphasis on headlines 
[Please turn to page 24) 



For the two big ones 
on the West Coast, 





use the two 
sure-fire lures 



You're not just fishing around when you use 
KHJ, Los Angeles or KFRC, San Francisco to 
cover the two biggest markets in the West. 25 
years of successful selling prove that these two 
key stations land the big ones every time. Com- 
plete coverage, more sales impressions per dol- 
lar, plus proven ability to deliver sales response 
— are all yours with these key stations of Don 
Lee— the Nation's Greatest Regional Network. 



KFRC * San Francisco 



5000 WATTS • 610 KC 



KHJ • Los Angeles 

5000 WATTS • 930 KC 



4fctu*£ 



BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



Represented Nationally by JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



17 JULY 1950 



11 



HDflBBHMKt 




* Baffling case this month. 

Fact is, the missing let- 
ters aren't really missing 
^ _ at all — you can find them 

on practically every time- 
buyer's list. Just follow 
the clues for the answer: 
CLUE NO. 1 






This letter is common to 
all twelve radio stations 
in Greater Miami. Only 
difference island ty| hat 
a difference!) this one 
belongs to the 50,000 watt 
station, biggest in all 
Florida. 

CLUE NO. 2 

Stands for V reat local 
programs, personality 
shows like Butler's Pan- 
try, Party Line, Today's 
Top Five (consistently 
out - rating all competi- 
tion) 

CLUE NO. 3 

You'll find the third let- 
ter in RiMings — for it 
belongs ro the station 
that is attracting more 
local and national adver- 
tising dollars in 1950 
than' ever before 
CLUE NO. 4 

It means purveys that 
•)' prove this station has 
j! more daytime quarter 

^A hour "firsts" than all 

^^ other stations in town put 

together; more top-rated 
local shows, more top- 
rated network shows; and 
daytime has more listen- 
ers than all three other 
network stations com- 
bined ! 
(Check your answer here) 




Katz has 
the figures 
to prove it 



Queries 



This new feature will present some of the most inter- 
esting questions asked of SPONSOR'S Research Dept. 
Readers are invited to call or write for information. 
Address: 510 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 



12 



Q. What percentage of children view television in comparison to 
adults viewing it? 

New J ork advertising agency 
A. A recent study of 1,850 families resulted in a percentage ratio of 
56% children viewers and 44% adult viewers. In this study the 
children viewing television numbered 1,050. 

Q. Can you give us the dates of SPONSOR success stories on spot 
announcements and station breaks, like Bulova? 

Netivork 
A. The following list of sponsor issues should be helpful: 31 Janu- 
ary 1949, page 32; 28 February 1949, page 23; 18 July 1949, 
page 41; 1 August 1949, page 48; 12 September 1949, page 36. 

Q. Have you done any service or comprehensive articles on the ef- 
fect of TV; also, we are interested in anything you have done on 
the effect of TV on other advertising media? 

New York librarian 

A. Two recent sponsor publications are available, and should be val- 
uable for your purposes. They are Radio Is Getting Bigger and 
199 TV Results. ( Both are free to sponsor subscribers, otherwise 
$1.00 per copy. Bulk rates given on request.) 

Q. Can you tell us how many television sets have been produced so 
far this year? 

Clothing manufacturer 

A. Latest report from the Radio-Television Manufacturers Associa- 
tion states: "TV set shipments during the first four months of 
1950 are estimated at 1,925,000 (i.e., shipments to dealers)." 
The April report shows set shipments by manufacturers to dealers 
in 36 states and the District of Columbia. 

Q. How does television affecl the viewer's eyes? 

Midwestern department store 

A. According to a recent report from the American Optometric Asso- 
ciation by Dr. Carl F. Shepard, "Television does not harm the 
eyes, but quite often it brings out the fact that a visual problem 
exists in the individual which might overwise have not been dis- 
covered until later." 

Q. Can you tell me which of your issues carried stories on early 
morning programing for farmers? 

Neiv York advertising agency 

A. 3 January 1949, page 28; 31 Januarv 1949. page 16; 18 July 
1949, page 30; 1 August 1949, page 30; and 15 August 1949, 
page 36. 

Q. ,n your 5 June issue, you refer to surveys of drug products dis- 
tribution in several Alaskan cities. How can 1 get these? 

Western advertising agency 

A. The surveys were made by Alaska Researchers to cover Anchor- 
age, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Ketchikan. Write to Pan American 
Broadcasting Company, 17 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. 

SPONSOR 



###>#•*>** €i 



Promotion Plan 
Tailor-made ,„ r 
Your Station! 



YOU NEED THIS PLAN 

1. If yours is a NEW STATION! 

2. If yours is an established station 
with a NEW STORY! 



3. If yours is a station which needs 
a SALES and PROMOTIONAL 
SHOT IN THE ARM! 



Here's a time-tested promotion plan 
that goes to work making friends for 
your station the moment you put it into 
effect. It gets your station call letters, 
frequency and slogan into locations with the highest traf- 
fic counts iti your locality. It costs you nothing. Instead 
it pays off to you in dollars and cents. And it does not 
tie up your own sales or promotion department. Get the 
details right away on this successful promotion plan. 



JVi re- HVrite- Phone 



Dixie Sales Promotions, Inc. 

I=Sheratnn Bon Air Building— Augusta, Georgia = 



17 JULY 1950 



13 



Your sales go 




The TEX BENEKE Show 

exclusive Beneke and Mill 
arrangements by one of 
America's top bands! 



"Swing and Sway with 
SAMMY KAYE" 

. . . featuring 

The Kaydets, the Kaye Glee 
Club, other name artists. 




Here's JUNE CHRISTY 

with the Johnny Guarnieri 
Quintet — a new approach in 
sophisticated rhythm. 



The RAY McKINLEY Show 

. . . Ray McKinley, his vocals, 
his drums and the most versatile 
band in the land. 





'CLAUDE THORNHILL presents 
Win A Holiday" ... a famous 
band plus a local-national contest: 
listeners name untitled melodies, 
win trips to New York. 



"THE SINGING AMERICANS' 

Dr. Frank Black's Male Chorus . . 
top choral performers, a con- 
ductor of renown, plus varied 
instrumental support. Ray 
Porter, assistant conductor 
and arranger. 



Johnny Desmond on 

"THE MUSIC OF MANHATTAN"... 

the melody and music that reflect 
the mood of fabulous New York City. 
Musical direction by Hugo Winterhalter, 



the new era 




Complete shows with these big names 
and many more ... for top 
sponsor-appeal, top sales power! 



You get more practical help than ever before 
from the new Thesaurus. More big stars are 
being added to the Thesaurus family . . . drawn from 
the vast fund of recording artists at RCA Victor 
and other talent sources. You get comprehensive 
programming, promotion, publicity ... a steady 
flow of hit tunes before they're hits . . . weekly 
continuity . . . special shows . . . voice tracks, 
tie-ins, cross-plugs, time and weather jingles, 
sound effects, mood music . . . lots of production 
"extras." Network-experienced writers do your 
scripting. New THESAURUS can help you to more 
sponsored programming! 




recorded 



program 
services 



Radio Corporation of America 
RCA Victor Division 

120 East 23rd Street, New York 10, N. Y. 
MU 9-0500 

Regional Offices: 

445 No. Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago 11, III. 
Whitehall 4-3215 

1016 No. Sycamore Ave. 
Hollywood 38, Cal. 
Hillside 5171 



lj/>ui snot advertising. 
belonas on WUDU-tneontp 
Boston station to- kaue 
inueased its overall audience 
dudna tke past yeai — further 
exnandina tint taeaest Boston 
audience tuned, dudna total 
voted time pedods, to any. 
Boston vadio station f&i the 
past twelve tnontks! 



50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 




Represented Nationally by John Blair 
Owned by the Boston Herald-Traveler 



C. E. Hooper Reports • April 194S through April 1950 



16 SPONSOR 



New and re 



17 July 1950 




These reports appear in alternate issues 



New National Spot Radio Business 



SPONSOR 

American Home 

Products 
Best Foods 
It I .ii / Brewing Co 

Lever Bros 

Lever Bros 

Thomas J. Lipton Inc. 

National Assoc of 1. 

bacco Distributors 
Procter & Gamble 

S & W Fine Foods 

Seeck & Kaile I nc 



PRODUCT 

Anacin 

Nucoa 
Blatz beer 

Good Luck margarin 

Lifebuoy soap 
Tea 

Industry promotion 

Shasta 
Coffee 
Musterole, Pertussin 



AGENCY 

Iluane Jones (N. Y.) 



STATIONS-MARKETS 

30 medium-sized cities 

ISO mkts 



Benton & Bowie* (N. Y. > 

Ka,tor, Farrell, Cheslej & 

Clifford (N. Y.) Four Texas mkts 

BBD&O <N. Y.) Major mkts 

SSC&B (N. Y.) 16 mkts 

Young & Rubicam (N. Y.) 1 0O mkts 

Wesley Assoc (N. Y.) 27 sta; 



Dancer- Fitzgerald -Sam pie 

(N. Y.) 
Foote, Cone & Belding 

(S. F.) 
Erwin, Wasey (N. Y.) 



nkts 
Major Mich., O. 

mkts 
1 2 Columbia 
Par stris 
54 mkts 
68 mkts 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 

Annrnits, chainhrcak ; 1 *) Jun-cml ol 

year 
Anncints, chainbreaks ; 10 Jul; 2 wk- 

or more 
A n limits; summer campaign 
Auncmts on women's partic shows ; 

11 Jul; 13 wks 
Anncints ; 10 Jul ; 8 wks 
Anncmts; 3 Jul; 6 wks 
Auncmts; 27 Aug; 5 wks 

Anncmts ; 3 Jul : 8 wks 

Second Cup of Coffee Time : 7 Aug ; 

52 wks 
Anncmts; Oct; 26-30 wks 

Sep; 26-30 wks 



New and Renewed Television (Network and Spot) 



SPONSOR 




AGENCY 


American Tobacco Co 




BBD&O 


American Tobacco Co 




BBD&O 


American Tobacco Co 




BBD&O 


Arnold Bakers Inc 




Benton & Bowles 


P. Ballantine & Sons 




J. ^ alter Thompson 


The Best Foods Ine 




Benton & Bowles 


Borden Co 




Young & Rubicam 


Bulova Watch Co 




Biow 


Harry T. Campbell Ine 




H. Lee Hoffman 


John E. Coin Co 




Chambers & Wiswell 


Allen B. Dumont 




Campbell -Ew aid 


General Foods Corp 




i oung & Rubicam 


Goodyear Tire & Rubber 


Co 


Compton 


Gordon Baking Co 




N. W. Ayer 


Great Atlantic & Pacific 


Tea 


Paris & Peart 


Co 






Gruen Watch Co 




Stockton, West, Burkhart 


Gruen Watch Co 




Stockton, West, Burkhart 


Lamont Corliss & Co 




Cecil & Presbrey 


Morgan Jones Co 




Victor van der Linde 


C. H. Mu--. Iin. in Co 




Clements 


North American Sweets C 


9 


H. B. LeQuatte 


Pepsi Cola Co • 




Biow 


Polaroid Corp 




BBD&O 


Potter Drug & Chemical 


Co 


Atherton & Currier 


Potter Drug & Chemical 


Co 


Atherlon & Currier 


Procter & Gamble Co 




Benton & Bowles 


Procter & Gamble Co 




Compton 


Procter & Gamble Co 




Pedlar & Ryan 


Ronson Art Metal Works 


Inc 


Grey 


The F & M Schaefcr Bre 


wing 


BBD&O 


Co 






Standard Brands Inc 




Compton 


Standard Brands Inc 




Compton 


TWA 




BBD&O 



NET OR STATION 

WNBT, N. Y. 
WNBT, IN. Y. 
WBZ-TV, Boston 
WNBT. N. Y. 
KNBH, Hlywd. 
WNBT, N. Y. 
WNBT, N. Y. 
WBZ-TV, Boston 
WRGB, Schen. 
WKGB, Schen. 
WBZ-TV, Boston 
WNBT, N. Y. 

WBZ-TV, Boston 
WNBT, N. Y. 

WNBK, Cleve. 

WNBT. N. Y. 

KNBH. Hlywd. 

WNBT, N. V. 

WNBT, N. Y. 

WNBT, N. Y. 

WPTZ, Phila. 

WNBT, N. V. 

KNBH, Hlywd. 

WNBT, N. Y. 

KNBH. Hlywd. 

WNBT, N. Y. 

WNBT, N. Y. 

WNBT, N. Y. 

WNBT, N. Y. 
WBZ-TV, Boston 

WNBT, N. Y. 
KNBH. Hlywd. 
WNBT. N. V. 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

20-sec film; 21 Jun; 40 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 17 Jun; 41 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 24 Jun; 40 wks (n) 
One-min partic; 22 May; 52 wks (n) 
On. ..i. in film; 28 Jun; 27 wks < ii ) 
One-min partic; 29 May; 13 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 3 Jun; 52 wks (r) 
20-sec, 10-sec film; 5 Jun; 52 wks (r) 
One-min film; 17 Jun; 13 wks (n) 
One-min film; 19 Jun; 52 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 16 Jun; 13 wks ( n ) 
Hopalong Cassidy; Sun 5:30-6:30 pin 

wks (n) 
20-sec film; 21 Jun; 52 wks (n) 
Hopalong Cassidy; Sun 5:30-6:31) pm ; 

<"> 
20-sec film; 19 Jun; 52 wks ( n ) 

20-sec film; 25 Jun; 52 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 27 Jun; 52 wks ( n > 
20-sec film: 5 Jul: 13 wks (r) 
One-min film; 13 Jun; 26 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 18 Jun; 52 wks ( n ) 
One-min film: 19 Jun; 39 wks <r) 
20-sec film: 9 Jun; 52 wks <r) 
20-sec film; 15 Jun; 52 wks «r) 

15 Jun; 26 wks (n) 

16 Jun; 26 wks (n) 
22 Jun; 45 wks (n) 
16 Jul; 52 wks (n) 

3 Jul; 52 wks ( n ) 

4 Jul; 26 wks (r) 
n ; 19 Jun; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec film; 3. 7 Jul; 52 wks <n) 
20-sec film; 28 Jun; 52 wks <n) 
20-sec film: 20 Jun: 52 wks <n) 



11 Jim; 17 



J Jun; 11 



20-sec 


film; 


2(>-sec 


film; 


20-sec 


film; 


20-sec 


film; 


20-sec 


film; 


20-sec 


film; 


One-min fill 



• fit next Issue: New ami Reneivett on Networks, Sponsor Personnel Changes, 

National Brotuleast Sales Executive Changes, New Agency Appointments 



Station Representation Changes 



\<*u- and Renew 17 July 1950 



STATION 

KALI. Pasadena 
WCAM, Camden. V J. 
WEXL, Royal Oak. Mich. 
WPIK. Alexandria, Va. 
«TOR. Portland. Me. 
W \* SW . Pittsburgh 
WXGI, Richmond 



AFFILIATION 

Independent 

iii<li'] Irnl 

I tmI. |M II. j. II I 

I II. I. p. II. I. I.I 
ABC 

Independent 
Independent 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

Schcpp-Reiner Co, N. Y. 

Schepp-Reiner Co, N. Y. 

Hil F. Best, Detroit 

Scliepp-Rcliier Co, N. Y. 

Everctt-McKinney Inc, N. Y . 

John Mail & Co, Chicago 

1 imI- i" i.. I. hi Metropolitan Sales. N. Y. 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 

Al Anderson 
Stephen P. Bell 
Joan I .iu Bishop 
David Boll, > 
Jaek Buker 
Donald A. Burn* 
Jaek Cahill 
Jeanne Carroll 
Taylor S. Castell 

Katharine de Reeder 
Kenneth S. Dnffes 
Ward V. Evans Jr 
Fri.nklin H. Graf 
John Halpern 
Ray Henze 
Rosier R. Hunt 
Diek Hunter 
Ruth Jones 
Julian Koenig 
Chester Kulesza 
Rohert C. Loehrie 
Stuart Ludlum 

Mai McCrady 
Ralph E. McKinnie 
W illiatn B. Maillefort 
Joel L. Martin 
Prcscott M.tealf 
Les Mosely 
John !\'eal 
William R. Ogden 
Esther Ojala 
Riehard J. Quigley Jr 
W . Donald Roberts 

Richard C. R lilhal 

Cynthia Logan Saakvitr 

lilert M. Sarazan 
Jerr> S<Tiuepli.,eh 

Walter I. Self 
i.ar, Sheffield 
Erwin Spitzer 
Eddie Stanley 
Brendan Sullivan 
Fred W. Swanson 
William T. Todd 
Eugene Waddell 
Charles W. Yeager 
Jules Marshall Ziagen 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

Amfra Corp. N. \ ., pub rel exec 
McCann-Erickson, N. Y., acct exee 
Foote, Cone «X Belding, Chi. 
Geyer, Newell «X Ganger, N. Y., copywriter 
Lonfr. S. F. 

Oakite Products Inc. N. Y. 
W. F. Coleman Co. S. F.. pres 
Complon, N. Y. 

Kenyon «X Eekhardt. 1\. Y., head of marketing, merchan- 
• I i in- a>nd research 

Puh rel consultant 

Comstock, Duffes & Co, Buffalo 

Bauer & Black, Chi. 

A. C. Nielsen Co, S. F.. vp 

Erwin, Wasey & Co, N. Y., asj»t radio. tv dir 

Wesson Oil, sis 



NEW AFFILIATION 



dept 



George P. Hollingbery Co. Chi 
Benton & Bowles, N. Y.. time buy 
Hirshon-Garficld, N. Y.. as«oc copy 

BBD&O, N. Y.. head of tv prod 
N. A. Winter, Des Moines, acct cxe 



ing dept 

chief 



N. W. Aver. N. Y. 

WCKY, Cincinnati, natl sis mgr 



Vlarion Harper Assoc, N. Y., \p 

I ml. inn. I. iii radio, h prod 

Biow Co. S.F.. co-mgr 

WINS, N. Y., prog dir. prod mgr 

WFYC, Alma. Mich., vp, gen mgr 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenficld, N. Y. 

St. Louis County Observer, St. L., »l- 

CBS, N. Y.. Western sis mgr 

Walertown, S. I)., Public Opinion, natl 

J. Walter Thompson, N. Y.. COp> st;iff 

Heeht Co. Wash, publ dir 

Jim Baker «X Assoc, Milwaukee, \p 

Better Business Bureau, Ballo., vp 
head of agency same name 
Hirshon-Garfield, N. V.. cop? chief 
J demount Pictures, L.A.. prod head 
C.K., N. ^ .. adv and sis prom super* 
Goodkind, Joice & Morgan, Chi., vp. ace 
Geyer, Newell & Ganger, N. Y., copy dir 
J. I). Tarehe, & Co, N. Y.. consultant 

Abner J. Celula ci Assoc, Phila. 

Head of own public rel CO, Miami. N. Y. 



I prod 



McLaren. Parkin, Kahn. N. Y.. head of radi 

Buthrauff A Byan, N. Y„ acct exec 

Advertest Besearch. New Brunswick, mgr of tv sis dept 

Same, copy group dir 

Botsford, Const ant inc •£ Gardner, S.F., acct exec 

Bass & Co, N. Y., aeet exec 

New tv stn representative outfit. Jno. J. Cahill & Assoc, S.F. 

SSC&B. N. Y„ radio time buyer 

Cecil & Presbrcy, N. Y., acct exec 



John Falkner Arndt. Phila.. dir pub rel 

Moser & Cot ins, Utica, aeet exec 

C. J. LaBoche & Co, N. Y., merchandising dept 

Same, vp and mgr of new western branch in S.F. 

Pedlar & Byan, N. Y., asst radio, t\ dir 

Ba-Tcl Representatives, N. Y., sis 

West Coast Radio Sales, S.F., mgr of S.F. office 

Same. Atlanta office 

Same, supervisor of all media on P&Cs Tide 

Same, copy chief 

Dancer- Fitzgerald-Sample, V Y.. head of tv com 

Langhammer & Assoc, Omaha, super v of copy 

Duane Jones, N. Y.. tv dir 

Brisaeher. Wheeler & Staff, L.A., acct exee 

Paul 11. Baymer Co. acct exec 

Edward Petry ci Co, N. ^ ., aeet exec 

F.mil Mogul. N. Y.. dir of research 

West-Marquis Inc, I \ radio, tv stuff member 

Foote- Cone & Belding, S.F., acct superv 

Products Services Group Inc, N. Y., acct exec 

LeVally Inc., Chi., mgr of radio, t\ dept 

SSC&B, N. Y., time buyer 

John Blair. St. L., acct e\w 

SSC&B, N. Y„ vp 

Barney Levin. Fargo, N. D., acct exee 
John C. Dowd, Boston 

Robert J. Enders, Wash., vp 

' ii Im i.l A Cuild, S.F., aeet super* 

Theodore A. Newhoff, Balto.. assoc 

McLaran. Parkin «X Kahn. N. Y., aeet exec 

Same, vp in eharge of creative prod 

> iek Knight. L.A., exec vp 

Peter Hilton, N. Y., acct exec 

Russell M. Seed-. Co. Chi., \ |». acct exec 

Monroe F. Dreher Inc. N. Y.. cop 3 dir 

O'Brien X Dorrance, N. Y.. m> 

l.ra) «X Rogers, Phila., assoi media dir 

Melvin, Newell & Rector. Ill>*d, cxe. vp 



Your Spot Radio Dollar 
Is A Better Bargain Than Ever 

WHO Costs 52% Less 

Than in 1944, and Influences 

66% More Buying Power! 



E. 



Iven though the costs of most commodities and services have risen by leaps 
and bounds since 1944, comparisons prove that spot radio in Iowa actually 
costs less today than five years ago. 

In terms of home radio sets, WHO cost 52% less than in 1944. This of course 
is due to the fact that Iowa home sets have increased by 1,236,000 (136%) 
since 1944* (and modern research proves that sets make today's audience). 



Even more startling than the lowered 
time-cost-per-thousand-home sets, however, 
is the fact that Iowa income in the same 
period of time increased $1,510,100,000, or 
66%. (Iowa's income in 1944 was $2,287,- 
000,000; in 1949 it was $3,797,100,000.) 
// in 1944 the expenditure of $1 for radio 
time impressed $1,000 of income, SI today 
would impress an income of $3,460. This 
means that expenditures on radio today in 
Iowa are more effective as regards total 
income by the astounding amount of 346% ! 



Since 1944, Iowa radio homes have even 
increased 29%, for a total of 769,200. Com- 
paring WHO's 1944 and 1949 rate cards, 
this represents a drop of 10.6% in time 
costs, per thousand radio homes. Thus, in 
addition to covering far more radio homes 
and receiving sets per dollar, spot-radio 
advertisers on WHO influence vastly 
greater purchasing power now than in 
1944. And, remember this analysis is for 
home sets alone — it omits the hundreds of 
thousands of sets in Iowa cars, barns, stores, 



schools, restaurants, offices, etc., as well as 
additional millions of sets in WHO's vast 
secondary areas in "Iowa Plus." 

No wonder WHO is today a "Better Buy 
Than Ever." For additional facts about 
WHO's great audience potential, write to 
WHO or ask Free & Peters. 




* SOURCE: The 1949 Iowa Radio Audi- 
ence Survey. This famous Survey of radio 
listening habits has been made annually 
for the past twelve years by Dr. F. L. Whan 
of Wichita University and his staff. It is 
based on personal interviews with thou- 
sands of Iowa families, scientifically se- 
lected from cities, towns, villages and farms 
all over the State. 

As a service to the sales, advertising, mar- 
keting and research professions, WHO will 
gladly send a copy of the 1949 Survey to 
anyone interested in the subjects covered. 



Wlnl© 

+/©r Iowa PLUS * 



Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



FREE & PETERS, INC 
National RepreaentatiTCS 



17 JULY 1950 



19 



HBBimKI 



Vld he $4V[ 

C6S 




WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

ces 

to one of the nation's 
highest cash farm 
income areas! 



( t 






ALLEN WANNAMAKER, 
WGTM, WILSON, N. C. 

fit/ 

I WEED A COMPANY 
\NATIONAL REP. 



5000 WATTS FULL TIME 
590 KC. 




3/r. Sponsor 



George J. Abrams 

Advertising manager 
Block Drug Inc., Jersey City, N. J. 



"Test, test, test; then ride, ride, ride." 

This is the basic advertising theory of George Abrams. advertising 
manager for the Block Drug Company. "Put the spot in and test it; 
if it proves good, then ride hard," says Abrams. One of his first 
self-appointed tasks at Block was to develop a systematic file system 
for the analysis of spot effectiveness. Through this systematic test 
and check, the company found last fall that 90' A of the spots used 
increased sales in their respective markets over the previous year. 

Abrams is not testing with peanuts. At 32. he is pushing around 
advertising dollars in the seven digit field. Block Drug has allotted 
him $4,000,000 this year. Of this. $2,000,000 will be devoted to 
Amm-i-dent; the remainder to 24 other products. Over 509r of the 
total budget is used for radio. The company usually uses five spots 
I at times a saturation of 50 1 per week in 170 markets. 

Abrams began his career at 16 as a reporter for the Orange Daily 
Courier. From reporting he graduated to advertising. He made the 
rounds from the National Biscuit Company as an all-around adver- 
tising assistant, to the Whitehall Pharmacal Company as product ad 
manager, to the Eversharp Company as director of market research. 

Block Drug hired Abrams as advertising manager in 1947 ( he 
was then 29). He soon found out that the advertising had to do the 
selling for the company; there was no sales force. It wasn't as if 
sales weren't on the upgrade when Abrams entered. They were 
averaging 8% to 10% increase annually. However, with Abram's 
guidance, sales practically doubled for 1949 and thus far for 1950 
as compared to 1948. His explanation is "radio." Relatively little 
radio had been used prior to his arrival. In 1951 air media will get 
over 70^ of ad budget. 

Continuously testing. Abrams and Block Drug recently signed for 
a new TV network show. The Amm-i-dent Mystery Playhouse (CBS. 
Tuesdays. 10:00 p.m.), and the daytime radio show. Quick As A 
Flash { ABC. Tuesdays and Thursdays. 11 :30 a.m. I . 

Happily married, Abrams has at least one personal problem for 
which his basic theory hasn't worked. "That's m\ golf game," says 
George, a little downcast, "I get the idea. I test it. and then I ride 
hard — I'm still in the 110's." 



20 



SPONSOR 



MR. SPONSOR: 
^^ How to Sell Vegetable 

Slice rs-Ttiousands of em /- 



\\t/> 






#JT 



U 
HI 
1ST 



At 11 PM . 



On a recent Saturday night at 1 1 o'clock, ten minutes 
of straight advertising on WJBK-TV sold over 4000 
vegetable slicers. At a dollar apiece this meant over 
$4000 of business at a time cost of only $180. With 
no gimmicks or come-on, and in a time bracket usu- 
ally considered poor, the orders poured in so fast 
that 6 telephone exchanges were completely knocked 
out. Think of it! Selling $4000 worth of potato 
peelers at 1 1 on a Saturday night and putting 60,000 
phones out of order — all this at a cost of only $180. 

Phenomenal sales results, yes, but not at all exceptional 

when the medium is WJBK-TV. In the abundant Detroit 

market, the superior 

programming, top-notch 
talent, and high listener- 
response of WJBK-TV 
combine to giye your I 

message the sales punch 
WKM ■ m that pays off. 

WJBKE» DETROIT 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 488 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 11. ELDORADO 5-2455 

Represented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 





A BIG BONUS 
FOR SPONSORS! 



ALL THIS 
PROMOTION 



Dlew developments on SPONSOR stories 




CAR CARDS... 

with sponsor credit appear through- 
out the year and cover the entire 
city. 




24-SHEET BILLBOARDS... 

blanket the complete Philadelphia 
Market Area, promoting WIBG 
programs. 




WINDOW DISPLAY... 

of sponsor's products faces directly 
on Walnut Street— downtown— the 
only such display on this busy 
thorofare. 



DIRECT MAIL... 

goes out regularly to selected 
dealer lists. Hard-hitting broad- 
sides promote sponsor's campaign 
and urge store cooperation. 



WIBG 

10,000 WATTS 



PHILADELPHIA'S MOST 
POWERFUL INDEPENDENT 

• 
Represented by ADAM J. YOUNG, Inc. 



p.s 



SSG '. "Not sponsored — but big business' 

IsSUe: 22 May 1950, p. 34 

Subject: Bobby Ben:on 



Six-shooters are blazing all over the place. 

The latest newcomer to the shows of the Wild West is Wild Bill 
Hickok who's galloping into the field backed by the Delira Corpora- 
tion which is prepared to invest .$5,000,000 to guarantee his success. 

Six manufacturers of cowboy clothes for kiddies have gotten to- 
gether to set up the Delira Corporation. Their idea: eliminate loose 
control of trademark rights that has become so prevalent among the 
other cowboy merchandising shows. 

The Delira Corporation will have complete merchandising control 
over the Western gear represented. The six companies now in the 
plan are: Robert Bruce Knitwear Co.; Irvin B. Foster Sportswear 
Co.; DeLuxe Wash Suit Co.; Varsity Manufacturing Co.; Schmidt 
Manufacturing Co.; and Saenz Manuiacturing Co. These companies 
will carefully choose 14 others; the 20 members alone will share in 
the indorsements. The retailers will be just as carefully chosen: only 
members of the American Merchandising Corporation and stores 
with a favorable reputation will carry the line. 

By fall, Wild Bill Hickok should be stampeding the air waves, 
radio and TV. And it probably won't be too long after that that he'll 
be in the movies and comic books. Present plans call for a series of 
52 TV half-hour shows, 39 weeks of 15-minute-daily transcribed ra- 
dio shows, and four films a year. Guy Madison and Andy Devine 
will star in the productions. Cost of the radio and TV shows will 
fall to the sponsors who will be permitted to advertise whatever they 
wish on the programs. Cost of movies will be borne by producing 
company to whom profits from same will go. 

The Western-type show for juveniles has been hot. As SPONSOR 
brought out in "Not sponsored — but big business." the Bobby Benson 
name sold, from March to May of this year, over $300,000 worth of 
merchandise in Macy's alone. It is reported that sales of Hopalong 
Cassidy-endorsed products this year will reach approximately $20.- 
000,000. Wild Bill Hickok will be shooting for a slice of this multi- 
million-dollar market. 



P^ym See: "Mail orders by the millions" 

• k^» Issue: 22 May 1950, p. 28 

Subject: Mail orders 

RCW continues to keep the mailmen moving. 

Recent reports of success in mail orders by TV can be added to 
those given in "Mail orders by the millions.'' After testing Instant 
Photo for two weeks on KFI-TV, Los Angeles; KLAC-TV. Los An- 
geles; KRON, San Francisco; and KPIX, San Francisco. RCW En- 
terprises is now spending $20,000 weekly on WOR-TV, New York; 
WGN-TV. Chicago; WBKB-TV. Chicago; WPIX, New York; 
WATV, Newark; KTSI-TV. Los Angeles; KLAC-TV. Hollywood; 
and KPIX. San Francisco, in promoting it. 

The company has found that it pays to pay the premium rate on 
TV and use the better evening hours. As in radio, they do not buy 
spots but stick to five-minute participations, using from one to ihnv 
per station each evening. One WGN-TV broadcast brought 2.500 
dollar sales. Another on WPIX. 1,000. Sales are still on the increase 
as coverage is expanded. At present, 8.500 to 10.000 orders per day 
are being received. 

Generally, RCW has found live commercials pull better than film. 



11 



SPONSOR 



MEET NEW YORK'S BEST SALESMAN! 

WMGM . . .THE STATION WITH THE LARGEST GROSS BILLING OF ANY INDEPENDENT STATION IN THE U.S.A. 




711 Fifth Avenue, New York 22, N.Y. . . MUrray Hill 81000 • Radio Representatives, Inc.— 737 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 11, III SUpenor 7-8121 



17 JULY 1950 



23 



In Buffalo you can go places 

- fast with mrK 




—AND ITS HIGHER-THAN-EVER RATINGS 





Leo J. ("Fitz") Fitzpatrick 
I. R. ("Ike") Lounsberry 



RAND BUILDING, BUFFALO 3, N. Y. 

National Representatives: Free & Peters, Inc. 



510 Madison 



{Continued from page 10) 

and sacrifices detail. A side by side 
comparison of the scripts of a five- 
minute and 15-minute news broadcast 
will dramatically emphasize this point. 
Finally, you must recognize the dan- 
ger in overemphasis on a five-minute 
program segment. Many stations — 
notably the network affiliates — find it 
difficult to program in this staccato 
fashion. Most of them do a splendid 
job to the complete satisfaction of 
their clients with the 15-minute news 
segment. Why sow the seeds of dis- 
content in the face of this situation? 

My congratulations again on an ex- 
cellent issue. 

Maurice B. Mitchell 

Director 

BAB 

Neiv York 



ALASKAN RADIO 

I want to congratulate you sincerely 
for the fine Alaska story in the 5 June 
issue of sponsor. It's a honey and 
tells the story most effectively. Thanks 
to you and all the staff of sponsor for 
giving Alaska radio a wonderful break. 
Gilbert A. Wellington 
National Advertising Manager 
Midnight Sun Broadcasting Co. 
Seattle 



IS BEETHOVEN COMMERCIAL? 

Your "Is Beethoven commercial" 
story in the 5 June issue certainly is a 
wonderful story from our viewpoint. 
The only thing that inhibits its use- 
fulness for us is the headline about 
"'markets of 2V-2 million." As you 
know. Washington is considered to be 
a market of only l 1 i> million and a 
few of our accounts are puzzled by 
this. 

However, the body of the piece is 
so good that we would still like to 
keep a supply of these issues in our 
file and if you can forward a bundle 
of 100 copies we will send our check 
for $25 by return mail. 

Once again let me congratulate you 
on the outstanding editorial job you 
are doing at sponsor. Apparently my 
opinion is shared by advertising men 
in Washington because I can assure 
you that sponsor is being read by 
them. Several of our agency friends 



24 



SPONSOR 



called the article to our attention. 

M. Robert Rogers 
Vice president 
WQQW 
Washington 



199 TV RESULTS 

We have your fourth edition of 
199 TV Results and would like very 
much to review the three preceding 
issues. 

M. Anthony Mattes 

Standard Oil Co. of California 

San Francisco 



SPONSOR PULLS EM IN 

We have just read "What pulls 'em 
in?" in the 19 June issue of sponsor 
and found it most interesting. 

We would like to have 30 reprints 
of this article if available. If there is 
a charge for this service, please send 
the reprints and bill us. 

A. N. Archer 

Sales Manager 

WCOM 

Parkersburg, W. Va. 



I want to congratulate you on pre- 
senting "What pulls 'em in" in your 
19 June issue. You will undoubtedly 
have many requests for reprints for 
this and I would like to get my order 
in early for 200. Will you please bill 
us for these. Q R Topmiller 

Station Manager 
WCKY 
Cincinnati 



In the 19 June issue of sponsor you 
have an excellent article entitled 
"What pulls 'em in?" 

We would like to circulate this arti- 
cle to all major retailers in Salt Lake. 
George C. Hatch 
President 

The Inter mountain Network 
Salt Lake City 



Will you please send us 200 copies 
of your article "What pulls 'em in?" 
in the 19 June issue of sponsor, and 
bill us for the cost. 

General Manager 

L. H. Thesmar 

WDAR 

Savannah 

• In reply to numerous reailer requests, SPON- 
SOR has iii.nl. reprints of "What pulls 'em in?" 
Single eopies available without eharpe to suh- 
seribers. Bulk rates on request. 







^ 



SPOT BUYERS: 



no matter what 
yardstick you use 



H HAM is your best buy 
— for Western New York 



Rcaons-why are legion. Here are just four, 
answering the most important questions that any 
time buyer will ask about a market and its cover- 
age. 



PENETRATION 



WHAM's 50,000 watts on a clear channel provide 
BMB primary coverage of 1 5 counties — dominant- 
superiority over any other Rochester station — plus 
bonus secondary coverage which draws mail from 
23 states. And if you want only the smaller 
Rochester Trading Area, WHAM still offers domi- 
nant BMB superiority over any other Rochester 
station! 



LISTENER LOYALTY 




WHAM has been covering this area for 28 years, 
longer than anybody else! We know our audience; 
they know us. A whole generation has grown up 
listening to WHAM! To many a home, radio and 
WHAM are one and the same! 



GRAMS 



The powerful NBC line-up, plus exclusive WHAM 
franchises to such participation shows as "Cin- 
derella Weekend", "Tello-Test", the "Answer 
Man" etc. — ideal for spot campaigns. In its own 
local programming, WHAM has won more awards 
than all other Rochester stations combined! 

And it's the only clear channel upstate station with 
early morning and noontime programs beamed di- 
rectly at the prosperous farmers, fruit growers, and 
dairymen in this rich farming area. 



= — PRESTIGE 



8 



WHAM's Rochester Radio City is a showplace 
drawing more than 120,000 studio visitors yearly. 
When people in this area speak of leadership in 
radio, they speak of WHAM — first to bring AM, 
FM, and TV to Rochester! 



WHAM 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Basic NBC . 50.P00-Watts • Clear Channel . M80 KC 
Owned and Operated by Stromberg-Carls»n Co. 

REPRESENTED BY 
GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 



m mm mm turn 



uiwmm 



17 JULY 1950 



25 




North Carolina Rates More Firsts 
In Sales Management Survey Than 
Any Other Southern State. 

More North Carolinians Listen To 
WPTF Than To Any Other Station. 



and NORTH CAROLINA'S 




50,000 WATTS 680 KC NBCaFF.UATF RALEIGH, N. C 

FREE & PETERS, INC. national representatives 



26 



SPONSOR 




SUBJECT 



Forecast 



DESCRIPTION 



Checklist 



;D0t Spot radio 

booming 



Station 
representatives 



Participation 
programs 



Transcriptions 



The nation's economics augurs highest volume of sales in history. With buyers 
increasingly choosy, and mounting manufacturing costs putting emphasis on 
hard selling, the fall situation is made to order for advertising. 



SPONSOR'S Checklist, revised in this issue for the fourth time, is life-insurance 
for every broadcast advertiser. We suggest you frame this page. 



More and more advertisers, national as well as regional, are climbing aboard the 
spot bandwagon. Availabilities are going fast. 



Reps are becoming increasingly valuable to advertisers and stations alike. But 
they may be in for years of "profitless prosperity" until their video investments 
pay off. 



Their use and effectiveness is on an upward spiral. The ready-made audience is 
their strong point, and national advertisers are flocking to them. 



National advertisers are placing more money into local transcriptions to pinpoint 
their radio advertising — with reduced budgets for network advertising. 



PACE 



29 



32 



37 



38 



40 



55 



Continued on next page V 



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tie k**wr price brackets, ciw fc l <****? »uva ■ I be ussi Ac 

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4. Coal is in for a progressively 
rougher time. Demand is way down, 
despite the limitless cheap supply. The 
vast expansion of natural gas due to 
additional pipe lines to the Eastern 
seaboard and Great Lakes regions 

with contemplated expansion to the 
Northwest I is causing both coal and 
oil interests many uneasy hours. Im- 
proved public relations will help coal 
to some degree; most people are fed 
up with John L. Lewis' shenanigans. 
That s a job for advertising to help 
lick. There is talk of an industry cam- 
paign to sell coal to the public; this is 
the year for it. Some regional adver- 
tisers like D. L. & W. will continue 
their efforts. Right now the battle that 
will help decide supremacy of the fuels 
is sale of gas appliances vs. oil appli- 
ances. 

5. Packaged foods companies are 
showing zooming sales curves; but 
declining percentage of profits. The 
trick is to successfully launch wider- 
profit lines; and such companies as 
General Foods, American Home Prod- 
ucts, General Mills are becoming ex- 
perts at the game. Under these condi- 
tions, advertising increases on two 
fronts, (1) for the new product. (2) 
to keep ahead with the old ones. There 
is a vast supply of foodstuffs through- 
out the nation with the exception of 
fresh fruits hit by spring frosts. In 
general, the average family's consump- 
tion of meat, fresh vegetables, and 
eggs has been constantly rising. But 
bread consumption, which in 1900 was 
225 lbs. annually per average individ- 
ual, is now down to 135 lbs. 

A prime factor in food advertising 
today is the full emergence of the 
giant market. With selection more 
fully in the hands of the housewife, 
advertising takes on a greater respon- 
sibility. Safeway will build 1.000 
stores by 1955. Food chains like Kro- 
ger's, A & P, Safeway, First National 
are revealing more interest in radio 
and TV than ever before. • 

The mixes will be a strong advertis- 
ing factor this fall, as will frozen 
foods, which arc practically a field in 
themselves. They're expanding at ex- 
pense of the rest of the market. In the 
frozen foods field, sale of fruit con- 
cent rates like Minute Maid and Hi-V 
are being snowballed by outstanding 
air personalities. 

Right now some firms llial are show- 
ing deeicled fall interest include Oen- 
eral Mills: Ralston-Purina ; Borden: 



Ward Baking; Standard Brands: Kel- 
logg: Florida Citrus Commission; Gen- 
eral Foods; McCormick Products; 
Duff's Baking Mixes: Best Foods: Hunt 
Foods: Kroger: S & W Fine Foods. 

With lifting of the 10c federal tax 
on uncolored margarine, and some 
states eliminating state taxes, margar- 
ine is in for an advertising spree. 
Jelke. Nucoa, Miami Margarine, and 
many others will participate, some re- 
gional, some national. Radio will be 
a favorite medium. 

6. The coffee market is in a hot 
seat, with severe shortage and accom- 
panying high prices taking their toll 
in consumer resistance. But there are 
hopeful signs for brand coffees: ill 
some substantial advertising by Bra- 
zilian interests. 1 2) predictions of de- 
creased prices and increased coffee 
production by the National Coffee As- 
sociation, I 3 I large supplies bought in 
the fall of 1949 by many families are 
now generally exhausted, so sales 
should improve. Coffee firms must ad- 
vertise in protection against compet- 
ing beverages and the fall season ap- 
pears to be the time when most well- 
known brands will be using radio and 
TV. Nescafe. G. Washington, Chase & 
Sanborn. Maxwell House. Folgers, Hill 
Bros, are some who will be in evi- 
dence. 

7. Under the impetus of advertis- 
ing, bread and cake companies are 
experiencing increased volume, but 

an accompanying narrowing margin of 
profit. Larger profit lines are con- 
stantly in the making. While the slo- 
gan of the bakers is "Buy it baked," 
such firms as General Mills are adver- 
tising brand products in effect under 
the general heading of "Buy it half 
baked." The good work of such firms 
as W. E. Long Co., Chicago (special- 
ists in bakery advertising I has helped 
during a trying period of bread con- 
sumption decline. Purity Bakeries, 
Ward Baking Co., Continental Baking 
regard radio as basic. Arnold Bakers 
have recently bought Robert Q. Lewis 
on CBS-TV. Regional bakers through- 
out the U. S. should make prolific use 
of radio and TV this fall. 

8. Dairy companies face a contin- 
uing squeeze between relatively 
high milk costs and consumer price 
resistance. Oddly enough, milk pro- 
duction continues to rise as scientific 



methods give a better yield per animal. 
Finns like Beatrice Foods, National 
Dairy, and Borden are attempting to 
move on to advantageous by-products, 
pharmaceuticals, scientific feed, and 
margarine. Some dairies, like Fore- 
most Dairies in Jacksonville, Fla., are 
going heavily into frozen foods. Fore- 
most sales were up 20' v during the 
first five months of 1950, with frozen 
foods accounting for virtually all of 
it. Beatrice Foods will test frozen and 
concentrated milk this fall. 

In the by-product race. Kraft has 
come up with a sliced and packaged 
"sandwich size" cheese that will be na- 
tionwide by the end of 1950. One of 
its sterling qualities is the fact that 
slices don't stick together. Called by 
Kraft executive v.p. G. W. Round "the 
most important development in cheese 
manufacturing and merchandising in 
recent years." this product will get ex- 
tensive advertising encouragement. 

Two of the big rivalries of big busi- 
ness are in the dairy products field. 
Mammoth Borden eyes its 40% larger 
competitor. National Dairy, zealously; 
both guard their secrets carefully. 
Borden is currently embarked on an 
ambitious spot radio schedule. This 
fall. Pet Milk is out to outdo Carna- 
tion in the evaporated milk field with 
the purchase of Fibber McGee & 
Molly, recently released by S. C. John- 
son Co. Carnation has upped its ex- 
tensive radio activities with a daytime 
show in addition to its nighttime offer- 
ing, and will also use cartoon films on 
a substantial list of TV outlets. Both 
Pet and Carnation were hard hit last 
year and early this year by the drastic 
drop in evaporated milk prices. 

What may be worth watching are 
the countermoves of the butter brands 
against the margarine campaigns. 
They wont let their market get away 
unchallenged. The government isn't 
helping butter's chances with its steep 
butter price controls. At the moment 
the government has in storage some 
150 million pounds, while the price of 
butter pushes margarine into a fa- 
vored position. 



9. The moppets love TV, and so 
do the candy manufacturers. This 
summer, the TV networks boast M & 
M, Mars, W. H. Johnson. Peter Paul 
and J. Lowe among their confection 
ery sponsors. Spot TV has some o 
these and others. There's a big ques 
tion: will the candy companies con 



30 



SPONSOR 



tinue to use radio as prolifically as 
heretofore? The answer rests in large 
measure with radio programing and 
what happens in a TV home after the 
first year of fandom. Surveys point 
out that the youngsters drift to spe- 
cific radio programs to supplement 
their TV viewing. 

Wriglev s and American Chicle pace 
the gums on radio and TV. 

10. There's no love lost in the 
nickel drink field, and there are re- 
peated moves by Canada Dry, Grap- 
ette, Dads Root Beer. Nesbitts Orange 
and others to boost their prices. But 
Coca-Cola holds to a nickel. Pepsi- 
Cola is making strenuous efforts to 
push into a serious contender role with 
Coca-Cola, but has a long long way 
to go. Intriguing advertising plans 
are brewing in the Pepsi-Cola shop, 
and the summer purchase of the Gold- 
en Gate Quartet on transcription to 
hit Negro audiences reveals its inter- 
est in hitting penetrable markets. Pep- 
si will also buy TV this fall, using the 
sales appeal of Faye Emerson three 
times a week on CBS-TV. Coca-Cola 
will continue its heavy use of radio 
I it spends $3,000,000 in the medium l . 
Canada Dry, the first soft drink to 
break into network TV. has a new 
campaign working. 

There's lots of unrest here. Adver- 
tising dollars, co-op, national, and re- 
gional, should flow freely. 

11. Looks like the bigger boys, 
Schlitz, Pabst, and a few others, 
are getting bigger while many of the 
smaller local and regional brewers are 
falling victim to sharply rising costs 
and limited capacity. Some of the big 
city breweries, like Schaeffer, Piel's, 
Atlas, have achieved vast sales propor- 
tions with radio as the sparkplug. 
Schlitz will have one of the costliest 
programs on the air this fall with its 
over $25,000 Pulitzer Theater TV pro- 
gram. It won't drop its successful ra- 
dio vehicle Halls of Ivy to do it. 

Singing commercials, many of 
standout calibre, have become a hall- 
mark for beers. 

Wines, too, are using radio exten- 
sively, with Virginia Dare. Mission 
Bell, and Italian Swiss Colony show- 
ing decided fall interest. 

12. Cigarette consumption is slow- 
ly rising. Economists say that amount 
of smoking has a relationship to na- 



tional income, which this tall will be 
whopping. At the moment, govern- 
ment activity has the industry waiting 
with bated breath on two counts : I 1 I 
will the proposed bill pass reducing 
federal tax on the "economy brands'" 
I those selling for 12c a pack or un- 
der, including federal tax) from 7c to 
4.9c a pack. If it does, well informed 
sources say that the \% of sales main- 
tained by the economy cigarettes will 
jump to as high as 259r . !2l What 
themes can the various brands emplo) 
in their advertising without treading 
on ETC toes? Several have been or- 
dered to eliminate claims of less irri- 
tation and less nicotine. Whatever 
comes, there will be unprecedented 
radio and TV activity this fall. Spot 
sources say that Camels, Chesterfields. 
Kools, Old Gold, Philip Morris, Spuds, 
and Pall Mall are inquiring about late 
summer and fall availabilities. The 
fight between the Big Three will con- 
tinue as always. Camels has just 
bought the Fat Man on ABC. 

With sales steadily declining, the 
cigar industry is troubled. During the 
war many smokers, finding cigarettes 
hard to get, switched to cigars. But 
the return switch has been going on 
tor some time. Too, prices are mount- 
ing ( there isn't a good 5c cigar any- 
where I . A joint national campaign by 
cigar interests will be aired soon. In- 
dividual firms like White Owl and Roi- 
Tan are showing some activity. 

Prince Albert and Mail Pouch smok- 
ing tobaccos will be on as strong; as 



13. What will the Big Three do? 

Watching Procter & Gamble. Colgate- 
Palmolive-Peet, and Lever Brothers 
jockey for position with their diversi- 
fied products is an education to any 
advertising observer. One Wall Street 
consultant believes that fall soap ad- 
vertising budgets are likely to be small- 
er than usual ( he contends that there 
is a semi-permanent shift in consumer 
spending from soft goods to hard 
goods ) , but other evidences contradict 
this view. Make no mistake about it: 
the Big Three are at war. Lever Broth- 
ers doesn't relish its backsliding of the 
past few years and is out to regain 
lost ground at the expense of its two 
arch-rivals. 

Lever's troubles stem primarily 
from one oversight. It didn't smell 
the revolution in the soap business. 
Recently E. H. Little, president of Col- 
gate-Palmolive-Peet, said: "We are 



changing from a soap business to a 
s\ nthetic detergent business.'' But 
C-P-P was experimenting with deter- 
gents back in the late '30s; P&G a few 
years earlier. Lever didn't start until 
1947. shortly after Charlr~ Luckman 
took over. 

When the big push arrived P&G and 
C-P-P were ready. Lever was not. 
Luckman may have been the innocent 
victim of unpreparedness. 

For a glimpse of what happened, 
here are some examples: P&G tri- 
umphed with Tide, a heavy-duty S) n- 
thetic detergent on which it spent $6,- 
000,000 in advertising the first year. 
Colgate's Fab, which has recently been 
improved, and may yet come in for 
heavy advertising, is a poor second. 
But Lever's Surf is a very distant 
third. 

Among the light detergents, Col- 
gate's Vel and P&G's Dreft are neck 
and neck. But Lever's Breeze is just 
an also-ran. 

How much preoccupation with the 
detergent problem threw Lever off base 
is not clear. Rayve (Lever) hair 
shampoo is behind Halo and Lustre- 
Creme ( Colgate ) and Drene, Shasta, 
and Prell ( P&G ) . Rayve home perma- 
nent wave kit flopped badly; couldn't 
dent Toni's market which totals about 
80% of sales. Pepsodent (Lever) was 
the No. 1 dentifrice in 1944; today- 
it's third with Colgate's on top and 
Ipana (Bristol-Myers) second. On 
the credit side, Lux and Lifebuov are 
doing well. 

So you can look for action, domi- 
nantly via the air, this fall. Neither 
radio nor TV is being overlooked by 
any of the Big Three. Colgate, big- 
gest of all spot radio users, is going all 
out on net TV with its $100,000 week- 
ly Cantor. Allen, et al extravaganza 
over NBC-TV and kinescope exten- 
sions. And it won't drop any of its 
three radio net nighttime shows, or its 
daytime offerings. From day to dav 
these firms grapple for position: as 
this is written the announcement is 
made that Beulah will go ABC-TV be- 
gining mid-October, supplementing its 
radio counterpart, with Ethel Waters 
starring. When Lever dropped Bob 
Hope, it picked up Arthur Godfrev. 
The numerous soap operas are con- 
tinuing. One thing is certain: the list 
will be long, the appropriations big 
this fall. 

Fels Naptha comes into Eastern 
( Please turn to page 118) 



17 JULY 1950 



31 









Sponsor cheek list 



how to use broadcast advertising* 



Determine what you expect broadcast advertising to do 
for your organization. 

(The nine items cover general requirements of manufactur- 
ing and sales organizations but each organization has its 
own peculiar problems. These must be ascertained in ad- 
vance or else any advertising campaign will probably fail.) 

a. Force distribution 

| | b. Move product 

c. Build prestige 

d. Build brand name acceptance 

I I e. Improve dealer-manufacturer relations 

f. Impress stockholders 

g. Improve employee relations 

I I h. Supplement printed media advertising 

i. Carry organization's primary advertising burden 



Make certain that talent pictures, biographies, and full 
program information (week-by-week details) are available 
to everyone requiring them. 



] Plan tie-in advertising, point-of-sale material, dealer mail- 
ings. 

(Correlation of all advertising activity with broadcasting 
pays substantial dividends.) 



| Plan the program debut as a show, not as an opportunity 
for organization executives to discourage listeners through 
long talks. 



| See that effective on-the-air promotion of program starts 
at least two weeks before the program makes its bow. 

(Free network and station time is available, but many 
advertisers are finding it productive of sales and increased 
audiences to buy bigger announcements to supplement 
what the stations and networks do.) 

| See that a complete promotion kit goes out to stations 
(if yours is a network program, the web's publicity de- 
partment will work with your agency and your advertising 
manager on this). 



Determine territorial coverage desired. 



Centralize responsibility for broadcast advertising. 



Working with your organization's advertising agency, select 
the broadcast form (spot radio, network radio, TV, FM, 
storecasting, transit radio) to carry the campaign. 

Build or buy the proper program or announcement to reach 
the market for the product. 



With the program and stations or network selected, hold 
conferences with your staff so that the entire organization 
knows the campaign and its objectives. 

Hold district meetings with your sales staff, briefing them 
on the broadcast advertising campaign. There should be 
preliminary meetings during which ideas of the sales staff 
in the field are obtained on the campaign. 



□ 



Set up a public relations conference with network or station 
publicity men, your organization's publicity department, 
agency's press staff, independent public relations men of 
talent, and perhaps package owner publicity men. 

(Working as a team, these men can increase the audience 
of any program. Without organization and cooperative 
operation, waste through duplication of publicity material 
is inevitable.) 



Establish a publicity plan for the campaign. 



Make certain that everyone involved knows the person 
in the organization who is responsible for your broadcast 
advertising. 

(That executive must be briefed on not only what the 
broadcast is supposed to accomplish but on the public 
relations aspects of tne program as well. 



] Design a dealer and distributor promotion kit on the 
program. 

(Make certain that the material does not duplicate that 
which network stations will use for the same purpose.) 



I Once the program has started to build its audience, travel 
it atound the country. 



I Formulate plans for continuing promotion. Only through 
week-in-week-out exploitation ' can a new program really 
be sold to its full audience. 



Tie program in with all merchandising and advertising 
plans. 



| | Make certain that everything that is done promotion wise 
(guest stars, special exploitation, etc.) reaches the pub- 
licity departments of the stations, networks and your dis- 
tributors and dealers in time for them to obtain newspaper 
space. 



Plan mail-pulls (contests and give-aways) far enough in 
advance so that they may be merchandised at the point- 
of sale as well as on the air. 



»•» 


□ 


Don't forget to write 
make promotion reports 


'thank you's" to the stations that 
on your program. 




Hi 


□ 


Where possible have 
ence to the program. 


product packaging include refer- 



I Check newspaper reaction to the program. 

(A special pness clipping order is broadcast advertising 
life insurance.) 



'Broadcast advertising is a living thing; it requires broadcast-by-broadcast watching, nursing, cultivating. It's a product that is being sold as 
well as one that is selling for you. Broadcasting has to be worked at and with to return full dividends. The easy way is the non-productive way. 



Albuquf rque 



Ames 



Atlanta 



WAAM-TV 
WMARTV 



Binghamton 



Birmingham 

WBRC-TV 
WAFM-TV 



Bloomi 

WITV 



Buttalo 



Charlotte 



Chicago 




4,100 sets in market 

parting Sap M-fh 6:45-10 pm: F 6:45-9:30 
pm; Sat 7-9:30 pm; Set efternoon 2:30-4:30 
pm: Sun 7-10 pm 

11,500 sets in market 

M-F 6 10 pm 



38,500 sets in market 

M Th l2:30-l7725~pm (approi): F I 

jpm; Sal 1-11:30 pm: Sun 4:30-11 pn 

JM-W 4:30-10:30 "pm; Th 4:30-10 pm 

30-10 pm 



ABC 
CBS 



182,000 sets in market 

M-F 12-12; Set 3:15-11:45 pm; Sun 3:15- 

11:20 pm 

M-F 1-11:55 pm 



M-F 3-11:30 pm (appro); Set 3-11:30 
idnight; Sun 4-11 pm 



15,500 sets in market 

M-F I 



10 pm 



17,000 sets in market 



DTN 
CBS 



n [ton 



M-F 12-3 pm; 5-10 pm 

J 6:30-9:05 pm; T 6:30-10:30 pm; W 6:30- 
10:05 pm; Th 6:25-9:35 pm; F 6:30-10:05 
pm; Sat 6.2510:05 pm; Sun 5-IOj05_pm_ 

7,900 sets in market 

M-F 6:45-9:30 pm 



>rd and 
Thompion 



395,000 sets in market 



M»Th 1:45-12:15 am; T-W 2:45-12:15 an 
Fri 245-I2J5 am; Sa l-Sun 1:15-11:45 pm 

WW 12:02 am (apprc 
pm (approi); 
11:52 pm 



100,000 sets in market 



M-Sat 3:65-11:30 pm; Sun 3:25-11:30 pm 



18,000 sets in market 



M-W 10:45 pm (opprox|; Th 6:30-10:45 
F 6-10:45 pm; Sat 5:30-11:15 pm; Sun 
5:30-10:30 pm 



540,000 sets in market 

M-F 



WSN-TV DTN 



M 



10-11 pm 



5:55-11 pm; Sun 3:25- 



10:36 pm; T-F 11-11:38 pm 
at 4-11 pm: S un 12-11:15 pm 
A 10:30-11:30 pm: T 11-11:5 
0:30-12:20 am; Th 11-11:20 | 
1:45 pm; Sat 3-12:10 am; Sun 



M-T 10-11:30 pm: W 10-11:15 pm: Th 10- 
im; F 10-12:45 am: Sat 12:50 pm-l:l5 
Sun 12:50-11 pm 



10:55-12:30 I 



; Sat 6 pm-10 pm; 



Cincinnati 127,000 sets in market 

WLW/T ,NBC 'Sun-F lOSS-midnight; 

ABC. DTN 'M-F 5:15-11 pm |app 

JSun 4.15-10:30 j>m 

M.W.F 3.30 11:05 pm. TSTh ! JO 10 05 pm 
jSat 5:30-10:05 pm; Sun 5-11:05 pm 

1240,000 sets in market 

M-F 1:30-12:05 am; Sat 5:30-1 

(4:30-10:45 pr 



WCPO-TV 
WKRC-TV 



Cleveland 

' NBC 



WNBK 
WEWSTV 



WXEL-TV 



CBS 



light; Su 



ABC. CBS. 
DTN | I0-I am; 

ABC. DTN M-F 2-rr 
|ll:30 pn 



idnight; Sat S-midnlght; Sun 4- 



Station 
Rap. 



Petry 



N. Y.— Ben 

ntson. West 
Coast — Keeni 
id Eicfce lborg 



Columbus {71, 000 sets in market 

WLW-C ^NBC Same sehed ul. el WLW-T, Cincinn ati 

WTVN-TV *ABC DTN UF 10 midnight Sal 1 Sun football 
WBNS-TV *CBS 'M-Sun 3 10:45 p" 

inglon, R.ghtc 



o.lo 



irthe, Bannen 



Davenpo 



WOC-TV 



Dayton 



WICU-TV 
Fort Worth 



Grand Rapids 



Greensboro 



Houston 

KPRC TV 



Hunting on 



Indianapolis 



(acksonvi 

WMSR-TV 



Johnstovn 



Kalama; 

WKZO-TV 



Kansas City 



Lansing 



Los Ang ties 



KNBH 



KTTV_ 
KTSL 



NBC. ABC 

CBS. DTN 



NBC 



ABC_ 
CBS 

DTN 



35,000 sets in market 

M 2-9:35 pm; T I M0:05 pm; W4F 2-10:20 
pm; Th 11-10:20 pm; Sat 2-10:35 pm; Sun 

3:45-9:55 pr 



M 5-9:30 pm; T 5-10:15 pm; W 5-9:55 pm; 
Th 5-10 pm: F 5-11 pm; Sat 6j30J0:30 pm 



14,000 sets in market 



M-F 6 10 pm; Sun 6-9:30 pm 



59,000 sets in market 



. WLW-T. Cincinnati 



M-F 6-midnight (epprox) 



Holling- 
jory 



260,000 sets in market 



M 3-11:50 pm; T-W 1:15-11:40 pm; Th 3- 
11:40 pm; F 12:45-11:40 pm; Sat 1:15-1 1:15 
pm ; Sun 2 -10:40 pm 

M-Sat l:30-midnight; Sun 3 30-10^45 pm 
M-F 11:30 pm, Set-Sin 5-midnight 

24,000 sets in market 

M-F 3-m,dnight 



-lolling, 
.ery 



27,000 sets in market 



M-F & Sun 3-to ilgnoff; Sat 5:45-signof( 



24,000 sets in market 



M 4:10-11 pm: T 12:20-11 pm; W 4-11 pm; 
Th 12:30-10:30 pm; J= 4-1 pm 

14,700 sets in market 

M>. StTrT 5-10:30 pml off Saturdays 



24,000 sets in market 



M-F 12-11 pm (appro.) Sat 5:30-10:40 pm 



11,400 sets in market 



M-F 6:30-10 pm; Sat indefinite; Sun 6-10 



42,000 sets in market 



M off; T-Sun 5:55-10 pm 



11,700 sets in market 



M-F 5:30-10 pm 



27,500 sets in market 



M-F 6-11 pm 



1 1 ,500 sets in market 



M-F 2-5 pm; 5:30-11 pm 



41,500 sets in market 



45,000 sets in market 



II Th 4-mid- 
idnight 



M-T 4-11 pm; W 4-11:45 [ 
n ight ; F 4-1 0:45 pm; Sat 4- 

9,6 00 sets in market 

M 6-11 pm; T-Th 6-10:15 pm: F 6-11 pm 
not on Sat; Sun 6-9 : 30 pm 



540, 000 sets in m arket 

M-F I- II pm (appro.) Sat 6-10:55 pm; Su. 
4:45-IO:55_pm_ 



M-F 6:15-10:30 prr 
1-9:15 pm 



Sat 2-10:30 pm; Sui 



M-F noon-ll pm (appox); Sat 5-10:30 p m 
M-F l-midnight; Sat 6-midnight; SunTV lO 

M.F 6-11 Dm- Sat HrMuHinA ;.J-i:.U. L~ 



M-F 6-11 pm; Sat wrestling, indefinite hn. 
M-F 5:l5-midnight (appro,); Sat 1:17 



Miami 



Newark 

yVatv 
New Ha 

WNHC-TV 



New Orleans 



Retry 



Louisville 



Memphi! 



Milwaul 

WTMJ-TV 



Minneapolis-St. Paul 



KSTP-TV 



Nashvill. 



WSM-TV 



New Yo k 



Norfolk 



Omaha 

WO W-TV [NBC 

V ABC, CBS 



36,500 sets in m arket 

M-Sat 5:30 pm-signoff; Sun I: 



M.W.Th.F.Set 2-10 pm; T 2-10:30 pm; Sun 
6:30-10:15 pm 



38,000 sets in market 



27,000 sets in market 



M-Sat 2 pm-signoff; Sun 4:30 pm-signoff 



1 19,000 sets in market 



M-F 2:27-11:30 pm 



M 3 signoff with ball game; T 3-10:15 pm; 
W 3-signoff; Th 3-10:15 pm; F 3-10:45 pm; 
" 6-10 pn 



M-F 2:15 



/ 1010:55 pm; T 10-10:10 pm; W 10-10:20 
.m; Th 10-10:35 pm; F 10-9:35 pm: Sat 
0-10:10 pm: Sun 1:15-11:05 pm 



96,000 sets in market 



pm-signoff; Sat 6 pm-signoff; 



ing till 15 Septembe 



ncluded in New York market 



lidnight; Sun _^-ll_ 



34,000 sets in market 



M-F 10:30 noon-4-4:30 pm; 5-11 pm; Sat 
35-5 pm and 6:30-11 pm; Sun 5-10:30 pm 



29,000 sets in market 



M 3:30-10:30 pm; T 4:30-11 pm; W 3:45- 
0:30 pm; Th 1:15-10:40 pm; F 1:10-10:30 
im; Sat 3:15-10:30 pm; Sun 2:30-10:30 pm 

1,410,000 sets in market 



Station 
Rep. 



Petty 



Free i Peters 



M 9:20-midnight; T-F 9:20-midnight; Sat 

3:20-11 pm; Sun 9:50-1 N 15 pm 



M-T no programing; W,Th,F 12:25-11 pm 
ppron); Sat 12:10-11 pm; Sun 4:15-11 pm 



M-F 3:15-11:30 pm; Sat 6:30-10:30 pm: 
Sun 4-11:30 pm 



M-F 9:30-11 pm (approx); Sat 2-midnight; 

Sun ^:50-IOjJ5_pm 

M-F 1:15 to signoff; Sat 12:30 to signoff;" 
gnoff 



T-Set 2-midnight 



Boston — Kettell- 
Cartel 

S.F., LA.. Port- 
land — Keener, 
nd Ei.delb.ro 



14,900 sets in market 



1-10:15 pm; T-W 1-10:15 pm; in 

1:18 pm; Sat :I5-I0:33 pm; 



; F 5-11:18 
1:08 pm 



Th I. 



Oklahoma City 29,500 sets in market 



Sun-F 7-9:30 pm 



KPHO-TV 



'ittsburf h 



25,000 sets in market 

M-F 3:30-10 pm; Sat 4-5 pm; Sun 4:30-10 
M -S 6:10-9:40 pm 

525,000 sets in market 



M 5:55-11 pm; TSW 5:55-1215 am; Th 
5:55-11:30 pm; F 5:55-12:15 pm; Sat 2:15- 
6:20 and 6:45-10:15 pm; Sun 1:30-11:30 pm 
MST 9-12:10 pm; W 9-11:30 pm; Th-Sat 
9-midnight; Sun 1 0:45- 10:30 pm 



DTN, ABC, 
CBS. NBC 



M-W&F l:25-midnight; Th 1:25-11:30 
Sat 1:3 0-10:30 pm: S un 3:20-10:55 pm 



7,200 sets in market 



I 6-10:15 pm; Sun 5:30- 



Free & Peters 



City £ Network 

Station Affiliatio 



Providei 

WJAR-TV 



Richmond 



Rochester 



WHAM.TV 

Rock IsT 



and 



WHBF-TV 



Salt Lake 



KDYL-TV 



124,000 sets in market 



M-F II. midnight (appro*) Sat 3- 
dnight; Sun 2:15-11:30 pm 



San Antr nio 

WOAI-TV~ 



San Die 

kfmbSv 



San Francisco 



Schenectady 



Seattle 



58,000 sets in market 

M-F IO:6TmTdnightf Sat iToi 
Sun I:l5-]fh45 pm_ 

31,000 sets in market 

M-F 4-10:45 pm 

2 10 pm 



45,000 sets in market 



City 



2:30-10:15 pm; Sui 



Included in Davenport market 

M-T off the air; W-F 6:30^ p^r. 



18,000 sets in market 



M-Sat 3- 10:30 pm 

i; T 2:25-10:25 pm: W 
6:45-10:20 pm; Th 1:30-4:45 pm; F not on 
5-10:2 5 pr 



15,500 sets in market 



M off the air; T 6:30-9:45 pm; W-F 2-5 pm 

and 6:30-10:15 pm (approx); Sat 2-5 pm 
ind 6-9:45 pm 



82,000 sets in market 



St. Lou 



Syracuse 



Toledo 



Tulsa 



Washing ton 



M 6:25-9:30 
6:25-10:30 pt 

M-T off the air; W 5-10:03 pm; Th 2-3:20 

,nd_5-N3:l_7 pm; F 5-9:48 pm; Sat 5-10:18 



T 6:25-10:05 p 
6:25-9:5 5 pm 



43,000 sets in market 

M-F 



i-ll pm (appro: 

30 pm 



Sat 6-10 pm; 



Station 
Rep. 



Petry 



69,000 sets in market 

M-F -s^noW; Sun 6-signoff 



M 6:30-10 pm; T-W 5-10:30 pm; Th 5-10 
F 6:30-10:30 pm; Sat 6-9:30 pm 



T-F 4-midnight; S.t 5:15- 



36,000 sets in market 



140,000 sets in market 



M-F 2:30-signoff; ! 
Sun ]2:30-signoff 



46,500 sets in market 



M-F 4:30-midnight 



. ...T 5-10:30 pm 
10.-30 pm ' 



.... W.F-Sat 5-11 pm; Th 5- 
6:45-10 :30 pm 



49,000 sets in market 



Wilmington 



WDEL-TV 



M-F 1-11:30 pm; Sat 1-9 pm; Sun 4-10:30 



25,000 sets in market 



M-F 5-10:30 pm (approx|; Sat 5:30-10:15 
pm: Sun 5:30-11:30 pm 



16,000 sets in market 



M-F l:30-midnight; 
3-11:15 pm 



1:30-11:45 pm; Sun 



138,000 sets in market 



M-F 3-midnight; Sat 3:30-11:40 pm; Su 
noon-l pm; 4:30-11:30 pm 



M-F 2:56-11 (approi); Sat 2:26-11:16 pn 

Sun 3:56-1 1:01 pm 

M-F 4-11 pm (approx); Sat 6: 15- 10:05 pm; 
Sun 4:30-10:15 pm 



M 12:55-11 pm; T 12:55-10:05 pm; W 
12:55-10:55 pm; Th 12:55-11 pm; F 12:55- 
10 pm; Sat 6 :45 -10 pm; Sun 6:30-10 pm 

33,500 sets in market 



6,400,000 sets (NBC estimate, 1 



luly) 



TV MAP FOR SPONSORS: FALL 1950 





,o.">" 



*W*ouk« 



Doveipo"( 




r> 



r s i •*s'" 



SEE OTHER SIDE 

Thin map and it* supplements include: 



jloon*" 


,lon 1^ \ S*i*""* y- -1 


jrfH>* 


y-^ " / .— — 1— ~ "TS"'" JW .JuiH 

r ______ — ^-— 7s j^^ ^^ 


U=J J^ Jte ^^5^ J 






6 ,.nv'"5 V "'J -- «"''*\. 1 ^| 


i 








\ ^v i ^«M 


KEY J 






• number of stations in city' 




-flTf) stations under construct' 


_ 1 A r~ ^^^X^ _ existing network links (1 
^ _ M 1AJM bbW .fffe. etwork links under const* 






tion* * 



. 1 1 cities 

• IV M(ili«i» 

• existing and planner! 
interconnections 

• II fimiK's by 
markets 



• T\ national repre- 
sentor i m bu stations 

• H netirorK- affilia- 
tion* bu stations 

• time of broadcast bu 
stations 




o 



•Sin„p,.,,.r. t i.,of.K-, m .P.WH8f"> 
l.l.ndh., oon. ..... o.i.inaDa..npo..» 

two operating station*. 
"Microwave facilities between *•" 
and Omaha due in 1952. 




510 Madison Vv.-.. \.» 'turk 22 
.s/i«.rif«( distance between buyer *vj seller 



Nut.- iii subscribers: copies of tl.it- map available free on request 







The rush 

for availabilities is on 



Spot Immiiii 



Q. Is the trend in spot continuing 
upward, or has it reached a peak? 

A. "Onward and upward" is still the 
keynote in spot; there is no indication 
of a levelling-off trend. On the con- 
trary, indications are that the steady 
progression of spot business, with each 
year's volume topping the year before, 
will be maintained strongly. It is in- 
dicated, however, that while the over- 
all dollar volume of spot business will 
be higher, some individual stations will 
find their spot income falling off, for 
this basic reason: the spot business is 
being spread thinner as more and more 
stations go on the air. There is con- 
siderably more spot money around, but 
more stations are competing for it. Big 



important stations as a rule will be 
sold out or close to it. 



Q. What product categories will 
be most active in spot this fall? 

A. Automobiles; drugs — particularly 
the anti-histamines ; hard goods in 
general; breakfast foods; frosted 
foods; margarines; dairy products. 

Q. What factors are upping the 
use of spot this fall and winter? 

A. The answer lies in the nature of 
the spot itself, and in the economic 
outlook. Spot's greatest selling point 
— flexibility — has never loomed larger 
than it does today. The Borden story 
is an obvious case in point. You can 
get a lively argument on both sides as 
to the wisdom of the Borden move, 



17 JULY 1950 



but Borden knew what it wanted and 
this was something network couldn t 
provide: pinpoint coverage designed to 
fit the firm's complex marketing pat- 
tern. Another key factor bearing on 
spot is television. No national adver- 
tiser, or even regional advertiser, can 
afford to ignore it. Even if he decides 
against buying TV himself, the 
thoughtful advertiser is weighing that 
medium's effect on his market area. 
The scramble into daytime radio is a 
direct result of such thinking. Because 
of the general economic uncertainty, 
the Displaced Advertiser is inclined 
( perhaps prematurely so. as will be 
discussed under networks I to choose 
the precision rifle of spot over the 
heavy artillery of network. This is be- 
ing intensified by the current interna- 
tional upheaval, and the market con- 
vulsions stemming from it. 



37 



lllll lllllii l iM IIIW II IIIIIIIII I I I I I II i llll l lllll l l l ll l ll l llllllllillllli ■■■Iiiilil 




When reps share ideas with key advertising buyers like W. D. Howard, Esty timebuyer Richard Grahl (2nd from right) explaining Camel 
Vick, H. M. Schachte, Borden (seated left and right) everybody profits spot techniques to Meeker, Hollingbery, and Avery-Knodel execs 



Agencies using spot 
radio most 



Q. Which advertising agencies 
place the most national spot ad- 
vertising? 

A. According to N. C. Rorabaugh, the 
following are included among the top 
20 spot placing agencies (not in order 
of ranking) : N. W. Ayer; Biow; 
BBD&O; Young & Rubicam; J. Walter 
Thompson; McCann-Erickson: Ruth- 
rauff & Ryan; Benton & Bowles; Ted 
Bates; William Esty; Sherman & Mar- 
quette; SSC&B; Foote, Cone & Beld- 
ing; Compton; Badger, Browning and 
Hersey. 



Radio representatives 



Q. What's happening to the radio 
station representative in the TV 
era? 

A. He has become more important 
than ever before, to the advertiser as 
well as the station, for this reason : 



the advent of television has enormous- 
ly complicated the whole business of 
timebuying — already a highly in- 
volved process. The situation changes 
daily, sometimes hourly, and the sta- 
tion rep is perhaps better equipped 
than anyone else to keep abreast of 
these changes. Because of this, the 
head of the average station rep firm 
is becoming more and more an admin- 
istrator, relying on his expanded pave- 
ment-pounding organization to keep on 
top of accounts. 

Q. What new or added functions 
are station reps performing? 

A. The reps, in increasing numbers, 
are furnishing stations and advertisers 
with statistical data and research find- 
ings often available nowhere else in 
comprehensive form. Practically all of 
the larger firms have set up separate 
TV departments which are supplying 
clients with media and market data 
of inestimable value in planning adver- 
tising campaigns. 

Q. Do the reps have any broad, 
general advice for the radio adver- 



tiser who is concerned with video 
competition? 

A. Yes. ( 1 ) Improve program con- 
tent. Radio has followed the error of 
the movie industry in underestimating 
the level of public taste. The radio ad- 
vertiser can increase his audience by 
"talking up" to it, program-wise, rath- 
er than "talking down." (2) Make use 
of the one-minute opportunities in par- 
ticipation programs. (3) Use spot ra- 
dio to do the job beyond the 40-50 
mile effective zone of TV coverage as 
well as reach practically all homes in 
the TV community. 

Q. What's the business outlook 
for the station reps themselves? 

A. The general outlook is good, since 
they are sharing in the overall spot 
business increase. One reliable indus- 
try source is of the opinion, however, 
that because of their recent heavy in- 
vestment in special television depart- 
ments, station reps as a whole are mov- 
ing into an era of "profitless prosper- 
ity." The opinion in that quarter is 
that it may be four or five years be- 
fore the reps' investment is balanced. 



Sometimes both client and agency attend. Here Frank Silvernail, Hope Alfred Nathan, Ronson (seated, 2nd left), talked TV to execs of Free 
Martinez, BBD&O, separate Al Brashaw, Frank Towers, American Tob. & Peters, Katz, Raymer, Weed, Petry, Blair during March session 







When Stewart Boyd, National Biscuit (2nd left), and Fritz Snyder, NARSR's Flanagan inaugurated spot clinic luncheons. At this one 
Bulova (right), start talking spot radio no smart rep fails to listen Pat Gorman, Philip Morris, greets Headley-Reed and Blair men 



Chain and station 
break advertising 



Q. Is there an increase in chain 
and station break advertising? 

A. There is a steady increase, but it 
represents the continuation of a trend 
rather than a new development. 

Q. What factors are contributing 
to the increased use of station and 
chain breaks? 

A. The general upsurge in spot buy- 
ing, primarily. Advertisers are learn- 
ing to make a variety of time buys do 
a variety of advertising jobs — station 
breaks, one-minute announcements, 
participations, programs. Advertisers 
likewise are giving their agencies, who 
pass it on to the station reps, more 
latitude in their choice of what kind 
of programs or announcements to buy. 
Thus the reps can exercise their own 
judgement in recommending the pur- 
chase of station breaks where such 
buys are indicated, as between two 
highly-rated programs. 



Q. What important advertisers are 
using station-breaks time on a big 
scale? 

A. Bulova and Benrus, among watch 
manufacturers. Lifesavers; Pepsi-Cola; 
Chiclets; United Fruit (Chiquita Ba- 
nana) ; Norge (refrigerators) ; such 
national magazines as The Saturday 
Evening Post, Colliers, Holiday, Look, 
and The Ladies' Home Journal. 

Q. What basic advertisers have 
used station and chain breaks 
heavily in the past? 

A. Virtually all the leading cigarette 
companies — Luckies, Camels, Chester- 
field. Philip Morris, Old Gold. Many 
of the top auto makers, particularly 
Ford; General Mills; Procter & Gam- 
ble; Miles Labs. 



Spot programs 



Q. Is there a trend toward spot 
programs, as distinct from an- 
nouncements? 

A. There is. and in television markets 



as well as non-TV markets. Advertis- 
ers such as Borden and Robert Hall 
Clothes are buying dozens of spot pro- 
grams in markets all over the country. 
Announcements are still being used 
heavily, but there is a growing trend 
toward buying spot program time on a 
like basis. Time segments and local 
shows are being bought in clusters — 
20 programs in one market, 15 in an- 
other, and so on. Topnotch transcrip- 
tions are often the choice. 



Q. What are the advantages of 
buying spot programs? 

A. Basically the same as those stem- 
ming from any spot radio buy: flexi- 
bility, economy, immediacy. Spot pro- 
gram campaigns can be set up in a 
matter of days (or hours, if necessary) 
through station representatives. Sta- 
tions may be bought in the exact spot 
where they will do the most good; 
schedules may be changed on two 
weeks notice. The program possibili- 
ties themselves — whether live or tran- 
scribed (see Transcription section) are 
almost unlimited. 



Big spot user is Ralph Robertson, Colgate-Palmolive-Peet (2nd left). At New York spot clinic Seymore Ellis, Philip Morris (2nd left), 
Albert Stevens (2nd right) is now American Tob., was National Dairy and Wallace Drew, Bristol-Myers (2nd right), shared the spotlight 




spot 




ML 



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Hill lllllllll lilllll llllllllll lllllWl 111 lllllllllllllll 111111 lllllll^ 

TRANSIT RADIO I 

I Ullllll 11! 



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74,000 GUARANTEED listeners ride 

daily on the 105 main-line 

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15,000 FM radio homes in Omaha! 

• 

Broadcast 6 A.M. to 9 P.M. weekdays 

and 3 P.M. to 9 P.M. Sundays. 

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Write or Call 
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Q. What factors enter into a de- 
cision on whether to use spot pro- 
grams or announcements? 

A. Budget, local market conditions, 
program availabilities, and individual 
station "personality,"' mainly. One sta- 
tion may pull strongly on announce- 
ments, another on programs. Close 
study of rating charts and station logs 
are helpful. An announcement between 
two strong adjacencies would be a bet- 
ter buy, for example, than a so-so pro- 
gram. The advertising agency and sta- 
tion rep can be extremely helpful to 
the advertiser in making such deci- 
sions. 



Participation programs 



Q. What are the primary advan- 
tages of participation (more-than- 
one-sponsor) programs? 

A. 1 he advertiser cashes in almost im- 
mediately on a ready-made, loyal au- 
dience; on a well-conceived program. 
The classic examples are such shows as 
the Arthur Godfrey and Don McNeill 
programs in the network bracket; Mar- 
tin Block, Barbara Welles, Cedric Ad- 
ams on the local stations. Most of them 
are built around a hard-selling "per- 
sonality" broadcaster, with a flair for 
taking the starch out of a commercial 
and thus multiplying its effectiveness. 

Q. What kind of station-built par- 
ticipation programs will be avail- 
able this fall? 

A. Women's service programs will be 
aired in increasing numbers; "Mr. and 
Mrs.' breakfast shows, and variations 
thereof; farm programs; early-morn- 
ing "musical clock" disk and patter 
segments. Disk jockey shows through- 
out the morning, afternoon, evening 
and after-midnight hours show no signs 
of abatement. More night lime is be- 
ing converted to participation use. Lo- 
cal give away and telephone-gimmick 
programs are increasing. 



Q. What dominant facts should a 
participating sponsor remember? 

A. Once he has bought an accepted 
hard-selling personality, an advertiser 
should adopt a "hands-off" policy to- 
ward the show. Most participating 
sponsors find it profitable to let the 
broadcaster handle the commercials in 
his own way after he has grasped the 



40 



TWO TOP 

CBS STATIONS 

TWO BIG 

SOUTHWEST 
MARKETS 

ONE LOW 

COMBINATION 
RATE 



KWFT 

WICHITA FALLS, TEX. 

620 KC 

5,000 WATTS 



KLYN 

AMARILLO, TEX. 

940 KC 

1,000 WATTS 



When you're making out that sched- 
ule for the Southwest don't over- 
look this sales-winning pair of 
CBS stations. For availabilities and 
rates, write, phone or wire our 
representatives. 

National Representative* 

JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



SPONSOR 




/ 



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INDIANAPOLIS 



The DETROIT Area's Greater Buy! 

— at the lowest rate of any major 

station in this region! 



CKLW with 50,000 watt power is hitting an audience of 17,000,000 
people in a 5 state region and establishing new performance records 
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any major station in this region means that you get more for every 
dollar you spend in this area when you use CKLW. Get the facts! — 
plan your Fall schedule now! 



Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 

National Rep. 



J. E. Campeau 

President 





m J fAUTU^y ■ 1 



Guardian Building • Detroit 26 



17 JULY 1950 



41 



iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiu 



spot 



basic selling points of the product. 
Many of the most successful campaigns 
on participation programs have been 
achieved without the use of a single 
written commercial. 

Q. What seems to be the mini- 
mum frequency for effective par- 
ticipations? 

A. At least a 10- or 15-minute seg- 
ment, three times weekly. Daily par- 
ticipations are preferred by most ad- 
vertisers. A participating commercial 
heard less than three times a week is 
likely to get lost in the shuffle, especial- 
ly if several other commercials are 
aired more regularly on the same show. 



It lock programing 



Q. Is there an increase in block 
programing generally? 

A. The answer is a qualified "yes." 
Block (mood) programing is not new; 
it has long been one of the basic for- 
mats for independent stations. Nation- 
ally, all networks use it one way or 
another; and locally, there is hardly a 
station not utilizing it to some degree. 
It's growth is a continuing process. 

Q. How is block programing used, 
and what techniques have been 
developed of special interest to 
advertisers? 

A. A perfect example of network 
block programing is the long-used day- 
time soap opera serials. Night blocks 
are prevalent on all the networks, like 
NBC's Tuesday night comedy shows, 
ABC's Friday night mystery thrillers. 
CBS's Monday evening drama pro- 
grams. MBS's Sunday night adventure- 
mysteries. Music played by the disk 
jockey is the basic block programing 
scheme for block pioneering stations 
like WNEW, and for local stations. Lo- 
cal block programing is not limited to 
the disk jockey format; sports, espe- 
cially baseball, is another favorite mo- 
tif. So are participation programs, 
news, folk music, classical music. 
WCKY, Cincinnati, devotes 14 of 24 
hours to block programing. The sta- 
tion lists four techniques used with 
good success: 

1 I The use of key personalities. 

2) Skillful selection of music to 
maintain the mood. 

3) MC's with the human touch. 



?' 



/ 



WTAL 




TALLAHASSEE 



5000 Watts — Day and Night 
the center of 

Capitaland 

Selling 

12 

Georgia Counties 

and 

11 

Florida Counties 

*Ask your John Blair 
man to tell you the full 
story on Capitaland and 
North Florida's most 
powerful radio voice — 
WTAL! 

Southeastern Rep. 

Harry E. Cummings 

Jacksonville, Flo. 

WTAL 

/ TALLAHASSEE 

John H. Phipps, Owner 
I L. Herschel Graves, Gen'l Mgr. 

FLORIDA GROUP 

Columbia 

Broadcasting 

System 



42 



SPONSOR 



spot 



strong on personal appearances. 

4) Station's 100% control over pro- 
grams in block. 

WCKY uses a two radio station mo- 
tif. Its programs are beamed to the 
metropolitan audience from 7 a.m. to 
8 p.m.; to the rural audience from 8 
p.m. to 7 a.m. The advertisers fit into 
these categories in relation to the audi- 
ence they want to reach. 



Q. Why and when should an ad- 
vertiser purchase time in a block- 
programed section? 

A. No one rule applies. General con- 
siderations must first be given to rela- 
tive factors such as the advertiser's 
product, the type of audience he plans 
to reach, his markets, the amount of 
money he can afford to spend. Most 
stations and networks are in a position 
to analyze these factors, and advise ac- 
cordingly where the particular adver- 
tiser would fit best. The recommenda- 
tions of the stations or networks should 
not be taken lightly; they are prepared 
to give the advertiser a ready-built au- 
dience geared to produce results within 
the block segment. 



Singing commercials 



Q. Are the number of sponsors us- 
ing singing commercials increas- 
ing? 

A. Actual statistics are not available, 
but a spot check indicates they are. 
Singing commercials have proven they 
can sell the goods for so many adver- 
tisers in such a wide variety of cate- 
gories that more sponsors are turning 
to them. Foote, Cone & Belding is cre- 
ating more singing commercials than 
ever before for its clients; Frank Saw- 
don agency plans increased use of Rob- 
ert Hall's one-minute musical transcrip- 
tions; Standard Brands switched from 
costly network programing to singing 
commercial spots to sell Chase & San- 
borne Coffee, Royal puddings, Blue 
Bonnet oleomargarine; Pepsi-Cola and 
Schaefer Beer have just launched new 
ad campaigns starring radio jingles; 
both the Rheingold Brewing Company 
and American Chicle Company are de- 
voting their entire 1950 radio budgets 
to selling via jingles. Oldsmoboile has 
done well with its jingles. So have 
department stores. This is but a very 
brief sampling of the growing volume 
of advertisers in many categories latch- 



ing on to musical commercials — a nat- 
ural result of the avalanche of success 
stories to be told by such sponsors lo- 
cal, regional and national (see spon- 
sor, 2 January. 1950). 



Q. What are the latest trends in 
singing commercials? 

A. Most singing commercials combine 
singing with talking, an announcer 
(male and/or female I amplifying the 
important points. The techniques tend 
to vary with the product, some adapt- 
ing to peppy, bouncy jingles, others to 
slow, easy-flowing music and lyrics. 
They vary in length from 15 seconds 
to one minute, occasionally more. 
Tunes are either taken from public do- 
main (like nursery rhymes) and paro- 
died, or are specially composed. 

There are indications of a trend 
away from the numerous jingles that 
repetitiouslv flood the airwaves toward 
a smoother, more polished approach. 
Lennen & Mitchell has been using Vic- 
tor Herbert's dreamy Toyland in the 
Lustre-Cream commercial ( Colgate- 
Palmolive-Peet) for almost two years 
now. Kenyon & Eckhardt has created 
a refreshing series of 18 one-minute 
spots for the Lincoln-Mercury Dealers 
of America, using a 14-voice choral 
group for strength and exciting effect 
in a variety of modern-style arrange- 
ments including pop song, rhythm, 
spiritual-folk and Western types. Sym- 
phonic conductor Dudley King direct- 
ed and Ray Wagner composed lyrics 
and music. Commercials will be re- 
leased nationally this month. 

Another pioneer along these lines is 
George R. Nelson, Inc., Schenectady 
advertising agency, which has created 
a new style of musical announcement 
for such accounts as General Electric, 
Pepsi-Cola, Mohawk Carpet Mills, Na- 
tional Dairy Products Corp. (Sealtest 
Products), Benrus Watch. George Nel- 
son and associates Bob Cragin and Ed 
Flynn believe in strong entertainment 
appeal, have composed full phono- 
graph-record length (three and four 
minute) popular numbers with com- 
mercial lyrics but no spoken announce- 
ments, the major portion being devot- 
ed exclusively to music performed by 
top-notch artists (e.g.: Maxine Sulli- 
van, Jan August, Johnny Cole). The 
new time segment makes the announce- 
ments good for use in juke boxes and 
presentation albums, are being widely 
played on disk jockey shows. In short- 
er spots, Nelson stresses variety to suit 



every taste, employs hillbilly music, 
South American rhythms, waltzes, 
marches, ballads, novelty tunes, Dixir- 
land, polkas to sell clients' product-. 
One amazed Midwestern station man- 
ager reported listeners were calling in 
to request their favorites from the Nel- 
son announcements being aired. 

There's no doubt about it, America 
has become "the land of the singing 
commercial." The people like 'em ( the 
A'. Y. Post in a recent spot check found 
four out of five approved) and the 
sponsors like 'em even more — because 
they sell. 

Q. What types of advertisers are 
using singing commercials? Has 
there been any significant change 
with relation to this? 

A. An almost endless variety of ad- 
vertisers have made resultful use of 
singing commercials since Pepsi-Cola 
burst forth with the first famous jingle 
in 1939. For the most part, jingles 
have sold a host of low-priced, quick- 
turnover items such as foods, drugs, 
soft drinks, cosmetics and clothing; 
but they are being used more and more 
by institutional types of businesses and 
heavy industry — automobile manufac- 
turers (like DeSoto, Oldsmobile, Lin- 
coln-Mercury ) , used car dealers, fur 
storage houses (like Canadian), loan 
services, banks, railroads (Lackawan- 
na). Jingles have all but built Sattler's 
Department store in Buffalo. Ameri- 
can Chicle Co. is a consistent user and 
I nitctl bruit u i 1 1 1 it- fabulous "'( ihiqui- 
ta Banana" (see sponsor, 13 February, 
1950) is outstanding for use of singing 
commercials. Among hundreds of oth- 
er highly successful users are Bristol- 
Myers (Vitalis), Procter & Gamble 
(Duz), Miles Shoe Stores, Red Top 
Brewing Company, Edelweiss Beer, 
Chateau Martin Wine, Paradise Wine, 
Broadcast Corned Beef Hash, Beich 
Candy Company (Whiz Bars and Pe- 
can Pete), Nedick's, Frigidaire, Pabst. 

Q. Who makes singing commer- 
cials? 

A. By and large, the agency under- 
takes the details for the sponsor, ob- 
taining the necessary writing, compos- 
ing, singing, announcing, and orches- 
tral talent. Sometimes its done within 
the agency, sometimes by a free lance 
expert. Compton Advertising created 
the Duz commercial; Foote, Cone & 
Belding the infectious Rheingold dit- 
ties; Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield the 



I 



17 JULY 1950 



43 



spot 



\ i l ill is jingles. The latest Schaefer 
Beer commercials I the new "PD . . . 
Q" theme ( combined the outstanding 
talents ol Ham Simian, composer for 
Fred Waring, and Bob Forman of 
BBD&O who did the lyrics. The sen- 
sational "Chiquita Banana ' was cre- 
ated by lyricist Garth Montgomery and 
composer Len Mackenzie, called in by 
BBD&O for United Fruit. Alan Kent. 
NBC announcer, and Austin Chrome- 
Johnson, BBC conductor, knocked out 
the original Pepsi-Cola jingle in five 
minutes and Lord & Thomas liked it. 
George R. Nelson. Inc.. Schenectady, 



tailors musical announcements for 
many top advertisers. 

Lanny and Ginger Grey, radio boy- 
girl team, act as composers, lyricists 
and talent for a wide diversity of prod- 
ucts from razor blades to noodle soup. 
I. J. (Wag) Wagner, prominent Chi- 
cago ad agency consultant, specializes 
in creation and production of singing 
commercials (see sponsor, 19 Decem- 
ber, 1949). A sponsor may also turn 
to the various radio and TV produc- 
tion and transcription services for cre- 
ation of his musical pitch. Harry S. 
Goodman, New York, who has made 




Augusta's oldest (established 1930), most 
l\. powerful (5000 watts day and night) and 
most popular (Hooper, 1950) station announces 
the appointment of 

HEADLEY-REED CO 

as our 

National Representatives 
effective 

Julv 1, 1950 



Memo to Timebuyers . . . 

Before talking to your Headley-Reed 
man, take a good look at these figures 



Hooper Listening Index (March-April, 1950) Total calls: 16,132 
Total Ratings Morning Afternoon Evening 



WRDW 30.6 

Sta A 25.3 
Sta B 23.0 
Sta C 19.1 



WRDW 31.4 WRDW 25.0 WRDW 36.0 



Sta A 28.7 
Sta B 24.6 
Sta C 13.2 



Sta A 24.2 
Sta B 26.4 
Sta C 22.7 



Sta A 24.0 
Sta B 19.1 
Sta C 18.5 



WRDW has rriore firsts in 30 minuU breakdowns than till other 
stations combined! 




CBS for Augusta, Ga 



commercials for Swift & Co., Silvercup 
Bread, Sears, Roebuck. Lime Cola. 
Richardson Root Beer, is a leader in 
this field. 

World Broadcasting, transcription 
library, has produced a variety of 
ready-made commercial jingles for fur- 
niture, loan service, used car, bread, 
men's and women's clothing, jewelry, 
fur. and fur storage advertisers. These 
are available via World subscriber-sta- 
tions. Standard Radio furnishes a va- 
riety of jingles, too. 

Q. What do singing commercials 
cost? 

A. It is difficult to be specific, since 
the many factors involved in creation 
and production of the tuneful commer- 
cial are highly variable. For instance, 
when created by agency staffers, the 
cost will be appreciably less than when 
written by a free lancer who may de- 
mand (roughly) $1,000 and up. Pro- 
duction costs range from several hun- 
dred dollars to over $3,000. Musicians 
and performing talent must be paid at 
AFRA scale. Harry S. Goodman, syn- 
dicated spot creator, charges anywhere 
from $500 to around $4,000 for mak- 
ing three or more singing spots for one 
account, the price varying with the cre- 
ative and performing talent used, the 
elaborateness of production, and 
whether the advertiser is local, region- 
al or national. 

Creating singing commercials is a 
highly specialized technique. To be 
done well for maximum public accept- 
ance they must have good writers, 
composers, talent: will often be expen- 
sive therefore. The consensus of ad- 
vertiser opinion is that it is worthwhile 
to pay well for an entertaining, clever, 
selling commercial with a good mel- 
ody. (Robert HalLs $1,500,000 radio 
ad budget, half of which goes for sing- 
ing commercials, has paid off hand- 
somely. '"Chiquita Banana'' will re- 
ceive $200,0004300,000 for radio 
from Lnited Fruit this year in recog- 
nition of her powerful influence.) 

However, a sponsor need not use 
Monica Lewis or the Mills Brothers to 
sing, nor Bud Colher or Warren Swee- 
ney to announce, for an effective com- 
mercial. With adroit handling, and I of 
utmost importance I proper program- 
ing, he can use much lesser talent, few- 
er facilities, and still make his tuneful 
pitch a highK profitable one. 
i Please turn to page 55) 



44 



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PRODUCTIONS N 



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Hundreds of delegates to 
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46 



SPONSOR 




AIR 
POWER 



SPONSOR presents an 8-page picture section devoted 
to proofs of radio/TV sales effectiveness 

Television: The Hofstra study 

Radio: American Research Bureau. Inc. surveys. 
Dun & Bradstreet survey, Lazersfeld study 



On the pages that follow you will find graphic evidence of radio TV sales power. 
From among research projects completed in the past two years, SPONSOR has 
selected reports which go the heart of advertising's mission. All the research 
results summarized in this section center around the consumer: his reasons 
for buying; what pulled him in; what kind of advertising hits him with the most im- 
pact; what retailers themselves say works best among consumers in national 
campaigns. For reading ease, each research report is summarized in 
pictograph and caption style. 



Note: Reprints of this section are available to subscribers on request. 



TV's potent 



sales punch 





MATCHED PAI 

Matched for: 

neighborhood 

age 

education 

family size 

standard 
of living 

buying power 



TELEVISION OWNERS .NON-OWNHW 



IOnly difference between two groups selected for Hofstra study was 
ownership of TV set. This meant that any difference in buying between 
two groups must be due to TV. Enough interviews (3,270) were conducted 
for validity. One-third of interviews in N.Y.C.; rest In Long Island 



Percent Buying Average 
TV-Advertised Brand in Past Month 



Hofstra study is most convincing 
measurement to date. 

It talks in dollars and cents 




30.1% sates increase 

77 New Customers 
per M sets 



Non-Owners Set-Owners 



DIAMONDS are a girl's best friend, as the current stage 
song has it. And. similarly, dollars and cents proofs of 
a mediums effectiveness are an advertising manager s 
best friend. Thus far. the most convincing proof of tele- 
vision's sales effectiveness is the Hofstra Study. Though 
it was released in May, it will stand for a long time as 
one of the strongest arguments TV salesmen have. It is 
also a model research project which sets precedents 
among all marketing studies and has won for its director, 
Dr. Thomas E. Coffin, one of the four annual awards 
presented by the American Marketing Association in 
1950. On this and the following three pages, you will find 
a step-by-step description of the highly significant meth- 
ods and conclusions of the Hofstra Study, presented in 
quick-reading chart and caption style. 

One of the high points of the Hofstra Study is its dis- 
covery of the dollars and cents relationship between extra 
sales produced by TV and cost of TV advertising. For 
the IS brands studied, the average total of extra sales per 
dollar spent on TV was $19. Usually, Dr. Collin believes, 
a return of $5 for one is considered successful return on 
most media. One of the brands studied got a return, of 
$74 in new business per dollar spent. 



Overall result: "average TV-advertised brand" shown above is com- 
posite of all the products studied. Difference between purchases of 
owners and non-owners amounts to a 30. \'7c sales increase for TV brands 
among owners (Pantry survey gave additional confirmation of results) 



Percent of all brands bought in past 3 months 



NON-SET-OWNERS 



SET-OWNERS 

16*7% Soles lncr»ai« 

for TV Brand* 



I Brands on TV □ Brands not on TV 




7 Full circles shown above represent all brands of durables bought in 
three-month period. White segment of circle represents purchases 
of non-TV brands. Difference between white segment in set-owner circle 
and white in non-owner is 36 r . . Durables not on TV lost over one-third 



1 



BRANDS STUDIED 




2 Fifteen low-cost, frequent-purchase brands which advertised on TV 
were paired with 13 non-TV brands. Brands in the two groups were 
matched for similarity of advertising history. Sunoco and Socony were 
paired with Texaco and Gulf; Chase and Sanborn with Maxwell House 



TELEVISION INCREASES SALES FOR EVERY 



PRODUCT CATEGORY 




CKARtniS M20R 

BUMS 



coira 



sow 



CHKSE 



DEjmract 



.Percent of each group buying TV brands in past month 



5 What can television sell? Results shown above indicate effectiveness 
for every type of merchandise studied. Note that the gasolines 
advertised on TV had 60.2% more sales among set owners. Dr. Coffin be- 
lieves nature of advertising rather than product accounts for varied results 






COMPLETE RE-SURVEY 

(96.6% of all cose* re- Interviewed) 



SURVEY 1 

January IV4« 



NON-OWN«S 



I 



TV-OWNEBS 



■T 



"/ y) 



4 months later 

SURVEY 2 

May 1949 



C 



{72 Nan-Ownan bought t.tt b«tw«»n w#rv.y») 

TO CHECK CONSISTENCY . TRENDS . RECENT SET BUYERS 



TOTAL 
51 



1619 
3270 



3 Four months after first survey, which included questions on viewing, 
commercial remembrance, and brand use, a second survey was made. 
It covered same brands, same questions, and basically the same people, 
providing double check of results (96.6 r r of respondents recheclced) 



Brands NOT on TV 
LOSE SALES in TV homes 



18.3% 



IOST WJYIRS 



14.8% 



19.1% sales loss 

Average percent 

buying 13 compering brand 

NOT on TV 



Customers LOST per M sets.. .3 5 



6 Not only does TV increase sales of TV-advertised brands in televi- 
sion homes; it also cuts the sales of non-television brands in those 
same homes. Thus advertising on TV "saves" customers which advertiser 
would lose if he were not on TV. Concept of "saved customer" is new 





SAME PEOPLE... 

Before and Afte 

(Percent buying brand in 
Brands NOT <"> TV 


>r ownin 

past month) 
Brand 

40.1% CAIN 


g a TV set: 
»0Ntv 




37.3% loss 




40.5% 






■■ V 


28.9% 






20.4% i 


j | 

12.8% 




BEFORE AFTER BEFORE AFTER 





8 In re-interview phase of Hofstra study, researchers found that 72 
people who were non-owners in the first survey had since bought 
sets. They were thus able to determine difference TV has on sales in brief 
two to three-month span of ownership. Television made immediate changes 



Television increases total sales 



Brands mentioned as purcho»ed 
during past month 



TV brands studied 
Brands not on TV 
All unlisted brands 



Total mentions 



2,099 

960 

799 
3,858 



2,625 

776 

627 
4,028 



A 4.4% increase in total buying by set owner* 



9 Can anything sell more soap or more cheese to Americans? They're 
thoroughly bathed and cheese-fed now. But television did it. Add- 
ing up all the figures, the Hofstra interviewers found that TV had increased 
total sales among viewers by stimulating use and more frequent purchases 



Does soles effectiveness HOLD UP. . . 
BEYOND Hie novelty stage? 



" 1 25.6% 



1 



32.9% 



<$ 



V? 33.6% 



\o< 



Vf 33.9% 



<;$ 



NON-OWNERS 1-9 MONTHS 10-15 MONTHS 16 MONTHS A OVER 

(Percent buying average TV brand in past month) 



•f ^^ First thing skeptical advertiser is likely to ask is: "Does TV's im- 
I ^J pact wear off?" Hofstra study anticipated such rebuttal, therefore 
made special breakdown of TV-owner panel by length of ownership. Buy- 
ing actually turned out to be just as high among long-time owners 




(Case history of a food product) 



Time + Talent + Commercials 
Two products advertised 
New York share of cost 
New York cost per M sets 



J 11,988 



* 5,994 



< 2,488 



' 4.15 



* 16.60 



per nek 

[per prefect 

per protect 
PHWtek 

per week, oi 
p« month 



>us*nA is down 



MJust how expensive is it to get results on television? The case 
study shown above and to the right is a conservative costs esti- 
mate based on the number of new buyers who say they use TV-advertised 
brands regularly. This program had 41.5% of its circulation in New York 



How does TV get results like those shown previously? It's a matter 
of drawing attention to the programs and commercials. Buying 
is directly proportional to regularity of viewing. One index of the effec- 
tiveness of visual commercials is the strikingly high proportion of recall 



> 




Does Television's influence stop with set-owners? 



What about 



non-owner viewing, 




and its effect 



The Hofstra Study 
explored this area, too . I 



nln a one-month period, two-thirds (68.49< ) of the non-owners In- 
terviewed had seen television at a friend's home or elsewhere. These 
non-owners watched for an average total of 7.9 hours per month. This had 
a marked effect on their purchases, adding to proofs of TV effectiveness 




IP" In chart at left, cost per thousand sets in New York works out to 
,J $16.60 per month. This particular advertiser gained 257 extra 
regular users per thousand sets, Hofstra study found. He thus got addi- 
tional customers to those supplied by other media for 6% cents per month 




1^"4 High commercial recall results in high sales. Base for chart above 
jjr is the sales of TV-advertised brands among completely unexposed 
customers. Larger figure at right is derived from the three out of four 
viewers who remember commercial. Sales figures are for one month period 



BONUS BUSINESS 



(Percent of non-owners buying TV 
advertised brand* in post month) 




les increase 
of 12.8%... 



30 Bonus Customers per M non-owner viewers, 
or 60 Bonus Customers per M TV sets 



•f ^^ Chart for bonus business above starts with the minority of non- 
I ^£ owners who had no exposure to TV. Of these unexposed non- 
owners, 23.5% bought brands advertised on TV. But, of the non-owners 
who were exposed, 26.5'7r bought TV brands (free sales plus of 12.8%) 





* TOTAL CUSTOMER GAIN 



♦ §{[, NEW CUSTOMERS 



SAVED CUSTOMERS 



BONUS CUSTOMERS 



TOTAL EXTRA 
CUSTOMERS 
PER M SETS 



1^% As previous picture panels have indicated, TV ups sales three 
.J ways: (I) among owners; (2) among non-owners; (3) among cus- 
tomers who would otherwise be lost to TV competitors. Figure of 98 new 
customers above is comparison of unexposed non-owners with owners 




$18"in extra sales 
. per dollar 
spent on TV 



I^T In panels 14 and 15 cost per extra buyer of a food product was 
^J worked out. That figure means little without this clincher: how 
much new business in dollars will TV dollars buy? Chart above gives the 
answer. The 257 figure used to multiple by $1.17 is figure for new users 



THE FULL POTENTIAL 


OF TELEVISION 

'Percent buying advertis 


ADVERTISING 

>d brand in past month) 
1 


NON-OWNERS UNEXPOSED | 






23.5 










GUEST VIEWERS | 






26.5 


■ 




AU OWNERS Bj 








: 33.3 


RECENT PROGRAM -VIEWERS | 








36.4 1 


REGULAR PROGRAM -VIEWERS | 








37.S | 


REMEMBER COMMERCIAL RECENTLY . | 








38.6 | 


LIKED COMMERCIAL RECENTLY | 








40.0 J 


FROM TOP TO BOTTOM... 

■ 


a 70.2% 


St- 1*5 EXTRA BUYERS -tj 
SALIS INCREASE 



^^ i^\ Seven breakdowns of Hofstra sample are summarized above. 
^£ ^^ Figures represent percent of each group who bought average TV 
advertised brand in past month. The 70.2% sales increase noted above 
represents difference between buying on top and bottom lines of chart 




$19.27 in extra sales 
for $1.00 in TV costs 



1 m f Is $18 in extra sales per dollar spent a typical figure? Actually, 
/ it's under the average for all 15 TV-advertised brands studied (see 
above). Hofstra study is one of first to work out extra sales per dollar 
ratio. One brand studied actually hit $74 in new business per $1 spent 




^% «1 Strong point of Hofstra study is its basic simplicity. Though re- 
j^^ I suits were tabulated in many ways (as panels shown have indi- 
cated), the basic research was straightforward. Two groups studied were 
painstakingly balanced so that only difference between them was set 



iii uniniiiii ni i iii i ii'fiin'M M u i Hi iiii i iiiiiiiiiii i iii ii m ii 



1 ARBI surveys 




LOCAL ADVERTISERS SEEKING TO CHOOSE BETWEEN RADIO AMD NEWSPAPERS ARE PERPLEXED BY INTANGIBLE PRO'S & CON'S 



Three proofs of radio's vitality 

ARBI, Lazarsfeld, Dun & Bradstreet studies all indicate 
radio's sales power in direct terms 



The perplexed and slightly peeved 
gentleman in the drawing above is a 
local advertiser trying to make up his 
mind between newspapers and radio. 
There's a lot to confuse him. Black 
and white salesmen push circulation, 
multiple readership, and other less sub- 
stantial factors. Radio pitches on BMB, 
program ratings, mail response, and a 
host of other arguments. 

But definitive dollars and cents ar- 
guments based on who's buying rather 
than on who's listening or reading arc 
relatively rare. 



52 



Every once in a while, however, re- 
searchers come up with studies that 
ring the cash register bell. Most re- 
cently, the American Research Bureau, 
Inc., of Seattle, has developed a tech- 
nique for testing newspaper vs. radio 
effectiveness on a customer by custo- 
mer basis. (And radio's way ahead in 
sales wattage. I In 1948 Dun and 
Bradstreet asked druggists, grocers, 
and gas station owners what medium 
does the most for sales of well known 
brands. (Radio was cited by an over- 
whelming majority.) And in 1949 the 



famous Lazarsfeld study (made for 
newspapers themselves I psychona- 
lyzed housewives, found that radio 
outdistanced newspapers by far in sell- 
ing impact. 

All three of these research projects 
have this in common: their evidence 
revolves around customers or retailers 
rather than around factors far removed 
from the market place. On this and the 
next two pages you'll find charts and 
drawings which tell the story of these 
three research projects. It's really the 
storv of radio's sales vitality. 

SPONSOR 







Though reader and listener measurements are valuable, they don't get 
to the retailer's problem: "what gives me most sales per dollar spent?" 




American Research Bureau, Inc., of Seattle, ignores program ratings, 
focusses on store traffic and sales attributable to newspapers, radio 




4 



ARBI works this way: Retailer puts equal amounts of money into ads 
and radio announcements, plugging same item. Result is acid test 




Radio outpulls newspapers consistently in ARBI tests. Traffic attrib- 
uted to radio is higher as well as volume of sales. Interviews get data 



a£vettisdo cutmomDns 



"The Advertising Dep&rtaent ef this stare is nuking a study of the 
effectiveness of its advertising. Would you mind answering * few quo- 
tient to help ua to determine boar effective this advertising IsT* 



1. Hoar did you learn shout our special offer? 



(a) Newspaper advertlseasnt 

(b) Radio advertisement 
(e) Other: 

Window display 

Salcsaan 

' solicitation 

Direct oall J^aJ 

Friend told no r^ ^""^ 

Just shopping ' 

Miscellaneous 



Si- <© 



(After giving respondent t 
in Q. 1, aaki) 

(a) (if newspaper) i When 

the newspaper? _ 

(b) (If Radio) i When die 



(a) What was there about 
attracted you? 

(b) What was there about 




Interview questions are designed to prevent prejudice. Customer is 
asked general question first, then gets chance for specific comment 



I it IS I surveys 10 stores 

Total advertising investments: 



Newspapers $673.02 

Radio $671.49 



RADIO NEWSPAPER BOTH OTHER TOTAL 



Traffic 

', Traffic 

Traffic Purchas- 
ing Test Mdse. 

', of Traffic Pur- 
chasing Test 
Mdse. 

' , Dollar Value 
of Purchases of 
Test Mdse. 



347 229 96 314 986 

35.2% 23.2'; 9.7', 3 1.9% 1007c 



222 



64.0', 



151 



65.9', 



67 



128 568 



69.8' 



' 



41.6', 27.77 



8.8', 



40.8', 



21.9', 



57.6 r / c 



ioo7c 



Results shown above are for a series of 10 store tests made in Pacific 
Northwest. Key figure (at bottom) is for '< dollar value of purchases 




2 Dun & Bradstreet survey 



- 
- 






! 



• 



3 Lazarsfeld study 



• _ - - 

• - . - 



- 
• - _ _ ~ ~ - 
- 



-:. i 






• : 



- 



: : 



3 



: 



- 












:: 



-.: •: 



or he mi d im i umdim£ or littemimg 



: ■ - 






1 



:: 
:: 
:: 

7 



:::■ 



Transcription 1 * 



Q. Are national advertisers in- 
creasing their purchases of tran- 
scribed programs? 

A. National awh-: sen are placing 
more and more money into local and 
regional markets in order to mor- -:- 
fa velv pinpoint their radio adv- 

Dealer Co-op'. In the trend 
i.-d spot and low-budgeted night 
1 s. transcriptions such as those sold 
'/.. M 31 Radio Attractions, T5I. 
and others are finding a ready market- 
The Frederic W. Ziv Compan . for ex- 
ample, had a one-program beginning 
in 1937. today produces 22 programs 

,eted at over SI 
than 1.100 stations carry their pro- 
grams. In 1946. they had only 12 
national advertisers sponsoring •: 
on a spot basis: today, they hare 
118. Among their advertisers are 
virtually every automotive concern. 
i-Coia. Pepsi- Bor- 

den's. Pet Dairy Products. Firs: 
tional Stores and Fleer s Double Bub- 
ble Gum. MGM Radio Attractions has 
eight shows of top calibre on - : - 
stations. The Harry S. Goodman Ra- 
dio Productions list about 800 adver- 

- - -ng 16 to 18 Goodman st 
. he Sterling Drug chain recently 
- . rd with Goodman for Your Gospel 
. -. for 10 markets. If the pro- 
gram proves successful, the chain is 
prepared to expand to 123 markets. 
TSI has just signed with Pepsi-Cola 
for its Golden Gate Quartet e.Ls on a 
WDIA. Memphis, test of the Negro au- 
dience. The Charles Michelson Com- 
pany reports a recent contract with the 
National Watch Company. Mich- 
- b has about 7-50 advertisers :ging 
?ome firms like Mavfair. 
L? Angeles -reducer of Box 13 with 
Alan Ladd I turn out shows that equal 
r snrpasE rk creations. Trendle- 

Campbell's Lone Ranger - - ase in 
poir: S ire the John Charles Thom- 
as she k Tefc - He 

and Beatrice I 
Sfcoac R: .i:: 



Q. How popular are transcribed 
programs in comparison to net- 
work offerings and live local 
shows? 

A. Poj -jlarity depends necessarilv on 
the show itself, and upon the competi- 



Z 



tive • -scriptions are I 

more accepted than ever before. . 
scribed Westerns and mysteries hold a 
high place among all shows. Boston 
tie, Cisco Kid. lf% Showtime 
u HoUrtcood. The Guy Lomhmrdt 
Shou. and Fatorite S 
garnered J mazing ratings 

'>xidman ■ . had the highest 
- - - . - 

framing. In 
Omaha. WOW hit an jpex 

with the All Western Tkeatr- 
man). The Sealed Book show Michel- 
in Cincinnati WCPO had the 
highest fi - - 



- ■ - 
-Scott k 









-_-_- — 



Q. In general, how expensive are 

trarncr pf : - : 

A. *2 :r 3 



SOUTH BEND IS A MARKET- 
NOT JUST A CITY-AND 



WSBT COVERS IT ALL 



i- : .~ "t: t ■ .- t- ------ 

r t-" : ■ ii -..-.; :;-ss — - ;tr ::": 
and Misliawaka — wirfc a combined popdanoc of 
L:~ 7 - i'.'.zi 5 -■ rr-; r.i:it: 

. -• :=-_=. . . - -■-. 

WSBT — and only W ; ;T- gives yo 
thorough coverage of this great marker r 
±s res: : W53T ; pr.-.irv irea r.ves 

i_ : ". : -j.. - ... ' : r : .7 - - -. z^^ 

.: — *._._:.: — . : i 7 




PAUL 



KAYMEt COMPANY 




NATIONAL 



17 JULY 1950 



55 



spot 



program will vary in cost in different 
markets depending on the size of the 
market and sometimes the station. For 
example, the All Western Theatre 
( half-hour I varies in cost from $8 a 
program in small cities to $300 a pro- 
gram in the largest areas; the cost in 
a cit\ like Omaha would he about $40. 



Q. What- library and program tran- 
scription services are there and 
how do they function? 

A. Several firms now are set up to 
provide transcriptions on an affiliate 
or library basis. 

M-G-M Radio Attractions, with eight 
Hollywood-name shows available, has 
an affiliate setup. A station taking five 
or more shows achieves "affiliate"' sta- 
tus, entitling it to receive the package 
at a greatly reduced rate. The affiliate 
gets "exclusive"' rights in its area, can 
utilize the programs as participation 
announcement carriers or for single 
sponsorship, local or national, and gets 
the benefit of promotional and sales 
effort by Music Corp. of America, reps 
for M-G-M. The shows total five and 



one-half hours weekly, have space for 
49 one-minute announcements. Adver- 
tisers may buy these programs, or tail- 
or-made packages, at a cost of between 
37 1 /2% and 50% of each station's one- 
time rate. 

M-G-M shows are The Hardy Fam- 
ily; Good News from Hollyivood; Dr. 
Kildare; M-G-M Theatre of the Air; 
Adventures of Maisie; Crime Doesn't 
Pay; Hollyivood U.S.A.; At Home 
With Lionel Barrymore. Sponsors in- 
clude Nedicks, Olympic Radio & Tele- 
vision. Zotos (Fluid Wave), Fisher 
Baking Co., Old Judge Coffee, Frost 
Stores. 

Michelson will launch its first librarv 
venture in September with the release 
of a package embracing drama ( in- 
cluding adaptations of some Dumas' 
works), mystery, comedy-variety, mu- 
sicals, pop and classic, and inspiration- 
al programs, all 15 and 30 minutes 
long. The package will be leased to 
stations on a one-year subscription ba- 
sis, and shows may be bought singly. 

The Bruce Eell's Program Library 
Service, a library operation, offers sta- 
tions its entire 1500 quarter-hour as- 



sortment of comedy, adventure, mys- 
tery, juvenile, dramatic, variety and 
musical type shows at rates depending 
on population in station areas. Eells 
gives "exclusives" in primary areas. 



Music libraries 



Q. What are the advantages of 
sponsoring already-prepared and 
scripted programs by music libra- 
ries (available via radio stations)? 

A. Many top talent music shows, ex- 
pertly built and scripted and easily 
adapted to local selling, are available 
at the local station at very low cost. 
This is the key to why so many local 
and regional (and gradually, more na- 
tional ) sponsors have been snapping 
up the shows based on music libraries, 
which are now standard equipment at 
a majority of stations. These shows 
feature such star names as Dick 
Haymes, Fran Warren, Vic Damone, 
Mindy Carson, Frankie Laine, and Tex 
Beneke; the artists record on an exclu- 



WBT reaches a market 




► Figure*: .-..I. - M. 
Sui V-". "t Buj in- 

Ma I9S( 

50 L009S davtinv 
01 nighll 



spot 



sive basis. 

Very frequently library shows pull 
down top ratings. For example, Asso- 
ciated Library's Songs America Sings 
over WSJS in Winston-Salem, N. C, 
recently captured a Hooper of 15.1 vs. 
14.3 for Counter-Spy on another net- 
work at same time. 

Each library is supplied on an ex- 
clusive basis to one station subscriber 
in a given area. Music library tran- 
scriptions are flexible, can be maneu- 
vered to desired time slots, and they 
are now beginning to be heavily sup- 
ported merchandising-wise. Some li- 
brary firms provide not only program 
promotion aids, but merchandising 
plans to help retailers get most from 
point-of-sale and merchandising tie- 
ins. Leading music program services 
are Lang-Worth, Capitol, World, Asso- 
ciated, Standard, RCA Thesaurus, Mac- 
Gregor, Sesac, and Cole. 

Q. What do the shows cost? 

A. Via transcription, thousands of 
dollars worth of name and glamour 
value are available to sponsors for 



"pennies." For example, The Stars 
Sing, a 15-minute 6-times-a-week show, 
costs Associated $6,840 per week to 
produce live. This same program can 
be bought by a sponsor on transcrip- 
tion for $150-$200 a week or less, de- 
pending on local time and production 
charges. Lang-Worth's Cavalcade of 
Music costs about $7,500 to product, 
is sold to sponsors on stations in main 
major cities at the flat rate of $1.00 a 
minute (30 min.) plus local time 
charges. 

The advent of TV and reduced bud- 
gets for AM are causing many national 
advertisers as well to look with favor 
on economical library shows in their 
growing move towards spot. Sears, 
Roebuck, Sherwin Williams Paint, 
Procter & Gamble, The Borden Co., 
Benson & Hedges and Trommers Beer 
are a few using musical transcription 
programs, frequently in combination 
with their local distributors. 

Radio is shifting more to music and 
news, many experts say. It thus ap- 
pears that music libraries will grow in 
importance to national advertisers. 



Q. Are music libraries expanding 
to include other types of programs 
available for sponsorship? What 
types? 

A. Originally, the music library con- 
sisted only of the musical transcrip- 
tions leased to stations. Then to help 
the stations program the music, the 
libraries began to supply scripts and 
other aids for using it as a source of 
commercial programs. Now, several 
of the music libraries are adding types 
of transcriptions and scripts that are 
a departure from straight music shows. 
Come October, Lang-Worth will of- 
fer three new shows, one comedy type, 
one Western, and its Mike Mysteries 
detective program (revised). One of 
RCA's Thesaurus shows, Win A Holi- 
day, features a quiz angle wherein lis- 
teners win trips by answering musical 
questions. World Broadcasting has in- 
troduced Musical Weather Jingles, Mu- 
sical Time Jingles, and Feature Pro- 
gram Signatures for use by sponsors, 
and Standard has also come out with 
a collection of weather jingles. Worlds 
Homemaker Harmonies is a service 
feature for women, blends music with 



bigger by far than 10 years ago! 




-^ 




...Almost 3V* times more retail sales dollars — 
$1,246,420,000 last year! (And lots more people, too!)* 






try WBT for size! 



JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY • 50.000 WATTS 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. • REPRESENTED W\ RADIO SALES 




To an Account Executive 

with radio budget problems and an ulcer 



»vet s-v,-' . . . .. -mown 

.... 

\ nit D< 

n 

hard 
te hiss ■ ■ ■• . 5 -. - ,« ing 

- 
- 

tds — o>r 

... 

■ 
- - eft ji^wr 

;> and 
■ x • VVM '." 

of s dins 
. '.■: butter, 
.■-.v«m . . . * 

\ H N ential 

1.1 million 

-.vsu-nivyr- . • ' - 

^ : . : 

5.W V> *"> sCC kC 




ro a s ..--- 



BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 








ou/ie UusitecC 
to ~tnc4- 

INVESTIGATION 

The r.:ore you investigate... the 

more Miami looms up as a 

profitable market. The more you 

investigate, WIOD will be 

your selection to SELL 

your products and services. 

. Details C--.7 Our Rep 
George P. HoQingbery Co. 



household ami fashion hints. 

Because die price of the library in- 
cludes all additional offerings, these 
availabilities offer the advertiser, 
whether national, regional or local, 
low cost programing with unusual \.i- 
vietx . 



Foroiijn-laiiiiiiaiJo 
broadcast in«' 



5,000 WATTS • 610 KC • NBC 



Q. What's the business outlook 
for the foreign-language markets? 
A. Prospects are better than ever. Re- 
search and measurement projects insti- 
tuted during the last year have shown, 
for the first time, that the foreign-lan- 
guage audience croups are bigger and 
more cohesive than was previously es- 
timated. \- N VR survej has disclosed 
that a total of 384 stations broadcast 
programs in languages other than Eng- 
lish — Italian. German. Yiddish, Polish. 
Russian. Spanish, and mam other 
tongues. The foreign language listen- 
er will tune in on T\ . but he won't 
forego his native-tongue radio show. 



Q. Where can an interested ad- 
vertiser obtain data on foreign- 
language markets and their sales 
potentialities? 

A. From the individual station repre- 
sentatives, the stations themselves, and 
from the Foreign Language Qualitj 
Network. The latter rgai ation. lo- 
cated in New \ ork. has taken the first 
big step toward collating and unifying 
market data on foreign-language sta- 
tions, and toward establishing uniform 
standards _ -urement. 

akulation. The advertiser 

rants .. h the Italian listener. 

sample, can obtain through this 
central source data on the Italian radio 
audience not only in New York, but 
also in Philadelphia. Chicago. Boston. 

other major markets. Ralph 
Weil of WOV, is president of the 
FLQN, and Claude Barrere is general 

_ 



Q. Is the foreign-language market 
big enough to attract the national 
advertiser? 

A. tainry. Vnd a blue-ribbon list 

- *s in on it. Several national ad- 
vertisers, particularly electrical appli- 
and radio and television manufac- 
turers, beam specially-written comnier- 



~> 



SPONSOR 



spot 



cials toward one or more segments of 
the foreign market. Conversely, other 
manufacturers, notably La Rosa, in the 
Italian food field, and Manischewitz. 
for Kosher products, have spread out 
into the wider English language station 
field from a modest beginning on a 
foreign-language station. 



Mail order and 
P. I. advertising 



of Radio Station Representatives 
which has led an industry fight agains! 
P.I., says "P.I. is dead." The trutl 
lies somewhere in between. The oddii 
are that P.I. is far from robust. The 
most recent activity on the P.I. from 
centers around the Chicago firm of Ra- 
dio Values, Inc. Radio \ alues claim; 
to have 100 stations lined up for a 
heavy fall campaign. The firm began 
tests in primary markets last month, to 
continue through July and August. 
You can find plenty of small coverage 



-tations taking P.I. business: very few- 
large ones who care to do business on 
this rate- weakening ba-i-. 



Q. What is the radio industry's 
chief objection to P.I. business? 

A. I he overwhelming consensu- 
that P.I. is a form of "'time chisel" 
which, once begun on a sizable scale. 
would demolish rate structures and re- 
sult in utter chaos among stations. An-. 
advertiser who is committed to a P.I. 
deal should remember that such busi- 



Q. Is radio being used increasingly 
for direct selling? If so, why? 

A. The increasing trend toward spot 
is in itself an indication of the grow- 
ing emphasis on direct selling. Mail- 
order radio, once used by only a few- 
advertisers for selected items, now cov- 
ers virtually every product the mails 
will carry — books, toys, novelties, food 
specialties, records, greeting cards. 
The advantages to the advertiser are 
manifold: results are tangible and 
clear-cut; there is no distribution prob- 
lem, thanks to the mails; mail order is 
especially efficacious in rural areas, in- 
accessible through normal sales chan- 
nels. Perhaps significant is the recent 
institution of mail-order radio cam- 
paigns by department stores — notably 
Schuneman's, St. Paul. 

Q. What about the anti-mail or- 
der talk? Are there any valid ob- 
jections? 

A. Not if it's "kept clean." Individual 
stations and industry organizations are 
delighted to approve mail order busi- 
ness, if it's placed in accordance with 
two cardinal rules: (a I all time should 
be bought at card rates; ibi the mer- 
chandise must not be misrepresented, 
or the advertising claims exaggerated. 
Undercutting card rates is a ruinous 
practice benefiting no one over tho 
long haul. If merchandise is misrep- 
resented in mail-order offers, the sta- 
tion is left holding the bag. the custom- 
er is justifiably disgruntled, and the 
advertiser gets a black eye. 

Q. What about "per inquiry" ra- 
dio advertising? 

A. A recent spurt in P.I. tended to 
create the impression that this form of 
timebuying was again on the upgrade. 
On the other hand, the National Assn. 




aofj MHujht dj)uni imioMn/ hew/ 





Let's do some straight talking. 
Kansas is a mighty good mar- 
ket. It's made up mostly of 
profitable, productive farms and 
prosperous agricultural commu- 
nities. In short, it's a farm mar- 
ket. 

Think this over! WIBW IS 

A FARM STATION. It's the 

preferred station of the farm 

and small town homes in Kan- 

is.* 

It makes mighty good sense 
to turn your sales job over to 
the station that goes right down 
the row of the homes that do 
the biggest part of the buying 
in this market. Join the hun- 
dreds of satisfied WIBW adver- 
tisers and be convinced. 

Kansas Radio Audience 1949. 






SERVING AND SELLING 

"THE MAGIC CIRCLE" 

WIBW ■ TOPEKA, KANSAS • WIBW-FM 




Rep: CAPPER PUBLICATIONS, Inc. • BEN LUDY, Gen. Mgr • WIBW • KCKN 



17 JULY 1950 



59 



spot 



and now... over a 6-month period... 

WCFL Leads in Chicago 

in Pulse-Rating Gains 



WCFL 

+ 9.77% 



* Chart shows percentage of increase 
or decrease, for 50,000 watt and full- 
time stations. Pulse period of Novem- 
ber 1949 through April 1950, com- 
pared to November 1948-April 1949. 
(Averages, 6 a.m. to midnight, Mon- 
day through Friday.) 



Network Station A 
+ 2.265% 



BASIS OF CHANGE: No< 



1949 



B 


■ 


■ 


m 


50,000 Watt Independent 
-4.52% 


11 


W 


■ 1 


■■ 


H 


M 


HI^H 


5,000 Wott Independent 
-11.06% 


1 


Hi^H 




w 


41 



Long-Term Leader! This chart* 
shows that WCFL, a month-by-month 
leader in Pulse rating increases, steps 
far in front of other Chicago stations 
for the half-year ended April 1950. 
Growing listenership plus reasonable 
rates make WCFL today's ideal Chi- 
cago radio buy. 



Network Station B 
-12.0% * 



Network Stotior. C 
-20.25% 



i 

▼ 



Network Station D 
- 23.16% 



WCFL 



An ABC Affiliate 



50,000 watts • 1000 on the dial 

The Voice of Labor 

666 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, III. 

Represented by the Boiling Company, Inc. 



ness is suspect, from the station's view- 
point, and proceed accordingly. 



"Deals" 



Q. What about the "deals" — is 
there anything wrong with them? 

A. Plenty. Complicated as some of 
the recent "deals" have been (particu- 
larly L'Affaire Beulah (P & G) and the 
General Mills-Lone Ranger scheme I 
one fact emerges clearly: all of them 
embody a "chisel" of one kind or an- 
other. The outcry against such at- 
tempts at rate-freezing, led by indus- 
try organizations and supported by all 
segments of the trade press, may well 
have nipped another insidious trend in 
the bud. However, there have been re- 
ports of new "deal" eruptions on a 
smaller scale. These involve Durkee 
Foods and Bulova watches. The Dur- 
kee deal, as it's worked on stations in 
Ohio, give the station, in return for a 
packet of announcements, five per cent 
of the monthly take of the local Durkee 
distributor. The Bulova deal, which 
originated with a retailer in Texas and 
is reported to be spreading, is a mail- 
order offer. The station plugs a Bul- 
ova watch on the installment plan with 
a $1 down payment. The station and 
dealer split the first dollar: thereafter 
onlv the dealer collects. 



Q. Why have some stations ac- 
cepted such deals, if they are un- 
desirable? 

A. Because mam smaller stations are 
feeling the pinch, financially, and have 
been unable to resist the temptation. 

Q. Does the advertiser bear any 
responsibility in such situations? 

A. He certainly does. Existing dis- 
count structures in both radio and tele- 
vision already are weighted in favor 
of the big advertiser. Why jeopardize 
the rate card structure of important 
advertising media for a temporary 
gain? Aside from this, all such ma- 
neuvers smell unpleasantly of attempts 
at price-fixing — an activity that vari- 
ous branches of the Federal govern- 
ment regard with disfavor and one 
which, if continued, will inevitabl) 
lead to more of the "government in- 
terference" that Big Business fears. 
[Please turn to page 66) 



60 



SPONSOR 



KMPC 






proves the aphorism 



"9? A 

l\CLCltO 



yy 



* 




A Leader 

in 

Los Angeles 



FREE SPEECH 

MIKE 



• 



50,000 Watts l^lVyiO/^ 1 M 

10.000 nights r^IVm^ ^^ 710 kc 



"Dollar for Dollar — Coverage-Wise 

Southern California's Best Buy" 

H-R Representatives Inc. 

National Representatives 

17 JULY 1950 61 













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if DEAREST MOTHER 
if FORBIDDEN DIARY 



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<SAM BALTER) 




WITH ZIV'S 



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Radio's most exciting half-hour mystery-adventure show! 



ZANESVILLE KANSAS CITY MOBILE ASHVILLE 

26.0 19.8 20.5 19.1 

Radio's greatest point-per-dollar buy. Consistently . . . beats all 
competition on stations from coast to coast! 






The sensational half -hour low priced western that should 
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YEAR FOR YEAR FOR YEAR FOR YEAR FOR 

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Mr. Sponsor asks... 




The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Sklarz 

If business re- 
mains at its pres- 
ent general satis- 
factory level, it 
seems likely, un- 
less serious war 
conditions inter- 
vene, the present 
trend toward spot 
radio probably 

will not only con- 
Mr. Eynon i -n . 

tinue but will in- 
tensify. The reason for this in our 
opinion is not the strength of AM ra- 
dio, but its present weakness because 
of television competition. 

Many national advertisers, allured 
by television, are still holding off for 
one or several reasons which are: (1) 
Television coverage is not sufficiently 
complete nationally to parallel their 
merchandising needs; (2 1 Television 
availabilities are not sufficiently plen- 
tiful in cities where only one or two 
stations exist; and (3) Television pro- 
gram problems have not been solved 
to their satisfaction. 

Meanwhile, having learned from ex- 
perience the productivity of proper air 
advertising, they are not abandoning 
radio. However, they are apparently 
shying away from heavy program com- 
mitments, particularly in the hours 
when television has most robbed radio 
of its audience. 

William II. Eynon 
Director of radio and TV 
Dowd, Red field & Johnstone 
New York 



Will the I relief toward national spot radio 
evideneetl thus far in 1950 continue this fall? 




Mr. Weed 



Leo Sklarz, Jr. 



\ es. I believe it 
will. It seems 
likely that spot 
radio will con- 
tinue to be good 
throughout the 
fall and winter 
and into the sum- 
mer of 1951. 

Several large 
national advertis- 
ers have decided 
to curtail or eliminate their nighttime 
network programs because they fear 
the competition of television in the 
first 10 markets. Much of the money 
saved thereby is being put into dav- 
time spot radio. As far as can be de- 
termined from these advertisers, this 
policy will be maintained until the 
summer of 1951 when it is likely that 
much of this extra money will be put 
into nighttime television programs. 

This one fact accounts for a sub- 
stantial increase in national spot vol- 
ume at the present time. Another is 
the advertisers' awakening to the many 
extra values offered by spot at the 
present time. 

Joseph J. Weed 
Weed & Company 
New York 



^ es. the uptrend 
in over- all spot 
radio volume is 
likel) to continue 
this fall — at least 
in relation to net- 
work radio. 

T\ . of course. 
is one of the rea- 
sons for the swing 
to spot radio 
since spot radio 
enables an advertiser to adjust his ra- 




Advertising and sales promotion manager 
Armstrong Rubber Co., West Haven, Conn. 



dio expenditures on a market-by-mar- 
ket basis — so necessary because of the 
wide variations in TV penetration. 
Also TV advertisers find that they 
need spot radio to round out their TV 
coverage not only in non-TV areas but 
also in TV markets. Remember, even 
in a market such as New r York you 
still need radio. Based on the latest 
TV set count in New York (1,365,- 
000). there are still 2.200,000 radio 
homes without TV within a 40-mile 
radius. Also current surveys show 
substantial home and out-of-home ra- 
dio listening by' TV owners. 

But TV is not the only reason for 
the trend to spot radio. Equally im- 
portant is the increasing awareness by 
advertisers of spot radios effectiveness, 
economy, and flexibility. Through spot 
radio advertisers can, in effect, build 
their own "network'' tailored to their 
own distribution and sales patterns. 
They are not compelled to buy a fixed 
combination of markets and stations — 
only those that best suit their needs. 
Daniel Denenholz 
Promotion manager 
The Katz Agency 
New York 



^^g^^ Since the war, 

B dio business has 

^ ^y followed a regu- 

C' lar pattern of in- 

creased activity 
in the fall. Each 
year this fall in- 
crease has been 
sustained evenly 
throughout the 
winter and spring 
months with a slight decline during the 
summer. In 1947, 1948, and 1949 fall 
business overall has been greater than 




Mr. McConnell 



64 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Walker 



any other season of the same year and 
in every case greater than the preced- 
ing fall. 

National spot radio's many exclu- 
sive advantages to advertisers has 
made 1950, thus far, the best year in 
national spot history. There is every 
indication that the fall of 1950 will 
continue this ascending trend and that 
more advertisers will spend more dol- 
lars in spot radio than ever before. 

James V. McConnell 

Director 

NBC spot sales 

New York 



This question is 
most opportune 
since never be- 
fore in radio's 
history has there 
been such a defi- 
nite upward trend 
in spot radio. 

The answer is 
"yes" — spot ra- 
dio billings will 
increase substan- 
tially this fall. Already, inquires and 
availability requests are at a higher 
level this year than in any previous 
year of the Walker Company's history. 
Agencies are asking more penetrating 
questions about the station's role in 
the community, local merchandising, 
audience promotion — in short, they 
are doing a conscientious job of ascer- 
taining the best media buy for their 
clients. 

Insofar as television is concerned, 
this new sales medium has proved once 
again that spot radio's flexibility is 
compatible with other media. 

Radio, generally, is as good a buy 
today as it ever was, and in many 
cases a better one. Spot radio with 
free market choice, flexibility of sta- 
tion selection and merchandising-pro- 
motion bonuses is the natural choice 
of the alert advertiser. Let's not for- 
get that station operators, sharpened 
to media fights, are doing a superb 
job of making spot radio pay — and 
the operators joined with representa- 
tives are determined to continue to 
make spot radio pay for every adver- 
tiser who buys it and every agency who 
recommends it. 

Wythe Walker 
The Walker Cot>}pan-\ 
New York 



Jazz... 

FOR THE NATION 

m 



WDSU Produces and 
Promotes Local Talent 
To a Nationwide Audience! 



m 




•'PAPA" 
CELESTIN 



From New Orleans — birthplace of jazz 
— WD5U sends a torrid half-hour of 
Dixieland music coast-to-coast every 
Saturday night (via ABC). Local jazz- 
men Bonano and Celestin have now 
become nationally famous figures. For 
the nation ... or for New Orleans only 
. . . WDSU can successfully plan and 
produce your show. 




Ask Your 

JOHN BLAIR 

Man 



17 JULY 1950 



65 



spot 



"Deals" 



[Continued from page 60) 

Q. Will a "deal" by a national ad- 
vertiser succeed? 

A. One of the biggest advertisers who 
have tried it reported to sponsor. He 
gave a cryptic "no!" 



Merchandising 



Q. Are advertisers overlooking 
merchandising opportunities at 
the station level? 



A. Unquestionably. While most sta- 
tions don't render a merchandising 
service, a SPONSOR survey has shown 
that even those few stations that spe- 
cialize in merchandising service for the 
advertiser only infrequently get re- 
quests for such service. As WLW, Cin- 
cinnati, points out: "Too many adver- 
tisers depend entirely upon their me- 
dia to sell their product rather than to 
advertise it. Merchandising as prac- 
ticed by WLW is designed to assist in 
the movement of merchandise and to 
take full advantage of the advertising 
put forth by our clients." 



the Long Island story 



IN LONG ISLAND'S NASSAU COUNTY 
— WHERE RETAIL SALES EXCEED 
$1,680,000 A DAY— WHLI DELIVERS 
1,000 BMB HOMES FOR 27c A 
THOUSAND! 



Among the Counties of the United States, Nassau 
County is 2nd in Net Income Per Family, 18th in 
Total Net Income, 24th in Food Store Sales, 36th 
in Population and 40th in Retail Sales. 



DATA SOURCES: 

Standard Rate & Data Consumer Markets 1950-51 
BMB Study #2— 

l-minute announcement rate, maximum discounts — 
Sales Management's 1950 Survey of Buying Power 



THE 



VOICE op LONG ISLAND" 



1100 <> B Y°ur dial 
WHLI-FM 98.3 MC 

HEMPSTEAD, LONG ISLAND, N.Y. 



Sponsors must remember to be fair 
to the station. Don't ask for merchan- 
dising cooperation, then cancel out, as 
one advertiser did shortly after the 
work is done. 

Q. What kind of merchandising 
services are offered by stations? 

A. Here are a few of them — remem- 
bering that these stations represent the 
exception rather than the rule: WING. 
Dayton, did a full-fledged job recently 
for Borden's; amazed the client with 
its remarkable scope. WING, Dayton, 
each month sends 200 pieces of di- 
rect mail to druggists and wholesal- 
ers, 876 pieces of direct mail to gro- 
ceries and distributors; twice weekly 
WING airs sustaining a show called 
"Good Neighbors" which plugs WING- 
advertised products. WLW sends out 
merchandising field representatives 
with route lists of groceries and drug 
stores which carry WLW-advertised 
products, to co-ordinate point-of-sale 
advertising with air selling. If the ad- 
vertiser doesn't request merchandising 
service, WLW takes the initiative in of- 
fering it. WFDF. Flint. Michigan, 
draws "no particular distinction" in its 
merchandising between national and 
local spot advertisers and the buyers 
of multiple programs. WFDF services 
include movie trailers, display ads. 
courtesy announcements, taxi signs, 
juke-box inserts, bus cards, window 
displays, letters to the trade, personal 
calls on wholesalers, jobbers and re- 
tailers, and route lists. In the foreign 
language field WOV, New York, does 
an outstanding merchandising job for 
its Italian-language advertisers. Serv- 
ices include block-by-block street maps 
of the Italian market; route lists of 
Italian grocers and druggists; letters 
to dealers; personal calls on retailers 
by WOV field men; distribution to re- 
tailers of window, counter, and floor 
display material; surveys covering the 
advertiser's brand and competitive 
products; courtesy announcements; 
sampling and demonstrations in Ital- 
ian stores. KOIL, Omaha, renders a 
strong service also. 



Co-op advertising 



Q. What are the advantages of in- 
vesting in co-op advertising? 

A. The over-all advantage is that of a 



66 



SPONSOR 



WE RATE! WGAR leads 
in more rated periods 
than all other Cleveland 
stations combined /WGAR 
ratings are greater than 
the next closest station in 
5 8 of 68 day quarter-hours, 
and greater in 54 of 7 5 
night half-hours. WGAR 
has just won the annual 
Cleveland Press Local 
Radio Poll for the fourth 
consecutive year, winning 
12 first place votes in 14 
categories. IMPRESSIVE! 




ACTIVATED! Shell Premium 
Gas and WGAR promotion! 
WGAR gets new listeners to 
Shell's daily newscasts through 
attractive full-color swivel- 
board posters in Shell stations. 
It's another promotional activi- 
ty by WGAR . . . promotion 
with drive! 



CO, A/oit^MiC OfUa.. 



-the SPOT-for SPOT RADIO 



Above: Mr. G. G. McKenzie, 
District Manager for Shell Oil, and 
a member of Cleveland Petroleum 
Club and City Club. Below: Mr. 
Sandy A. Flint, Division Manager 
of Shell Oil Company, Cleveland, 
and member of Cleveland Petro- 
leum Club, Chamber of Commerce 
and Mid-Day Club. Shell Oil is a 
WGAR sponsor. 



SUNDAY PUNCH . . . with 
smiles. For the first time 
in 15 years, WGAR has 
changed its Sunday morning 
programming and has time 
available for sponsorship. 
The Bob Smiley Show is 
featured in this new line-up. 
For added sales impact at 
low cost, consider this bright 
program of Sunday morning 
pop music. Ask about it. 



RADIO . . . AMERICA'S GREATEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



WGAR . . . Cleveland 



90,000 watts . . . CBS 



Represented Nationally by Edward Petry & Company 



17 JULY 1950 



67 



spot 





In Harrisburg, third in Pennsylvania sales, WHP 
is overwhelmingly FIRST in radio. 

Its alert and public spirited program formula has 
won many an award in its quarter century of broad- 
casting. WHP is prouder still of the fact that it has 
consistently held an unparalleled share of the listener 
interest in its community. 

In its new home on the dial at 580 kilocycles and 
its more effective power of 5,000 watts day and night, 
WHP will extend its coverage throughout a much 
wider area in Pennsylvania's rich South Central belt 
and beyond. 

Now, more than ever before, WHP is the national 
advertiser's best radio buy in the highest per-capita 
retail 6ales center in the Keystone State. 

Your road to increased sales in 
South Central 
Pennsylvania 




HA KRIS BURG, PA 



partnership arrangement between the 
manufacturer and his dealer or distrib- 
utor. Both share a common goal, and 
both act cooperatively to promote the 
same product. In some instances, the 
national advertiser can with this type 
of advertising take advantage of local 
rates. Through his dealers, he can lo- 
calize his advertising. 

Q. What should an advertiser re- 
member with respect to his co-op 
advertising? 

A. The field of co-op advertising is 
large, and standards of practice exist 
for almost all classes of products. For 
competitive reasons alone, the adver- 
tiser should know what breakdown of 
co-op advertising is standard in his 
product category. One quick way to 
determine this is through the use of 
the Broadcast Advertising Bureau ra- 
dio and TV co-op cards; well over 100 
companies are now represented on 
BAB's cards. 

Q. How can an advertiser properly 
give his dealers an understanding 
of the most effective use of radio 
in their areas, including which sta- 
tions to select? 

A. In general, the more advertising 
aids and material with which the ad- 
vertiser supplies the dealer, the more 
assurance the advertiser will have of 
the best possible advertising. Aids and 
material are not enough unless they 
are accompanied by clear information 
relative to their use. Certainly the sta- 
tion and the time of broadcast should 
be picked on their ability to do the job, 
not to personal considerations. No sin- 
gle rule is universal. Often the manu- 
facturer knows the dealer's market bet- 
ter than the local dealer. The automo- 
tive industry, with tremendous co-op 
funds, is prone to use national agen- 
cies; on the other hand. General Elec- 
tric uses no national agency in its big 
co-op set-up. The dealer often knows 
the habits of his community better 
than the manufacturer, but may not 
have advertising know-how. Perhaps 
the best course is a middle path be- 
tween the scientific knowledge of the 
manufacturer and the community 
knowledge of the dealer. 

Q. What are some of the major 
problems confronting the co-op 
advertiser? 

A. Too often co-op advertising is 



68 



SPONSOR 



Buy Keyes Perrin on the New "Musical Clock" and 

Cash In On A "RISING "Market! 



\ 



WAo 



f 



^ pe ::e^*- ew t« ** " 5 

.V.W-« odW d sp°n wne W > dials 

31 W .. a zip a" d SP . o {ot *e.t d 
Clock' a rea ch-aS an i»- 

»««** T: a o« *" "%l a «** 

fo ll°*><* .. n ... m a^- pU u r list. 

BaHiaa— ^ **.«*<* V 

b ud g e, .—"« *_ ■ — ^ 



l 



*7<& ^<wk£ o^ SeUtufuvtc 



. . . and every program and announcement on WCAO 
is duplicated on WCAO— FM (20,000 watts) at no 
additional cost to the advertiser! 



CBS BASIC • 5000 WATTS • 600 KC • REPRESENTED BY RAYMER 



17 JULY 1950 69 



spot 



looked upon as a type of rebate. Un- 
der such circumstances, the manufac- 
turer does not receive dollar value in 
advertising for dollar spent. Another 
major problem is encountered in bill- 
ing the manufacturer for advertising 
done. Often the dealer does not under- 
stand how to submit his bills, and has 
his money tied up for months while the 
matter of incorrect billing is being 
straightened. In the meantime, the 
dealer may cancel before the pay-off 
in advertising results is actually 
reached. Education in co-op advertis- 



ing should go hand-in-hand with the 
whole campaign effort. 



Regional networks 



Q. Is the number of regional net- 
works growing? 

A. Standard Rate & Data lists some 
58 regional networks of varying sizes 
in the United States. They range from 
small groups of three or four stations 
to the Don Lee web of 45 stations on 



SLti 



/ 



/ 



A 



*rv/0 



mMz' 



HIGHEST 

in Des Moines, 
Hooper-wise! 



WHEN YOU'RE ON KRNT, 
YOU'RE ON THE BEAM! 



C. E. HOOPER SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

APRIL MAY. 1950 DES MOINES. CITY ZONE 17,445 CALLS 



Time 



Morning 
Afternoon 
Evening 
Sat. daytime 
Sun. afternoon 



KRNT 


B 


c 


D 


44.1 


3.1 


8.6 


20.9 


42.9 


4.4 


9.9 


12.3 


27.5 


7.9 


7.6 


25.5 


30.6 


4.5 


16.8 


23.4 


29.0 


9.7 


17.2 


18.9 



17.1 
25.5 
28.0 
14.1 
13.0 



^ l p r e a r!^s 35.1 | 5.9 | 9.6 |20.4 1 23.6 




LOWEST 

PER-IMPACT 

COST! 

BUY THAT 

Very highly Hooperated 
Sales results premeditated 
ABC Affiliated 
Station in Des Moines 

Represented by the Katz Agency 



the Pacific Coast. Texas Quality Net- 
work has four stations; Tobacco Net- 
work (eastern N. C), eight: Texas 
State Network. 18; Yankee Network 
(New England), 28. They're to be 
found in practically every state, cover 
a host of markets only lightly touched 
by the national networks, many with 
peculiarities and customs different 
from the nation as a whole. The Key- 
stone Broadcasting Co., a national 
transcription network (400 stations!, 
which concentrates along with the re- 
gionals on the "beyond metropoli- 
tan" areas, has added 100 stations in 
the last two years. 

Though perhaps not increasing in 
actual number to any notable extent, 
the regional networks have been get- 
ting increased business, the national 
representatives say. One rep pointed 
out that his network has become more 
of an entity than it has ever been: 
greater advertising activity has drawn 
the member stations closer together in 
common effort. This may indicate that 
regionals, many of which are now 
somewhat loose groupings, will become 
more unified as increasing revenue in- 
fuses new lifeblood into their opera- 
tions. The present upward trend in 
spot will work to their advantage. 

Q. When should an advertiser use 
a regional network? 

A. When he wants to obtain more lo- 
cally concentrated coverage in a par- 
ticular area than that area's power sta- 
tion alone can offer. It's the medium 
between the individual station and the 
national network. offers selective 
broadcasting on a broad area base. 

Advertisers are finding that the 
hometown station usually has far more 
impact in its own community than a 
50,000-watt station in another city can 
offer. The latest BMB study shows ex- 
tremely high listener-loyalty to local 
stations. The advertiser on regional 
networks has the advantage of obtain- 
ing these "favorite audiences" ready 
made. More important, he has an op- 
portunity to slant his selling approach 
to make the most of markets that have 
their own peculiar problems. 

Q. What national advertisers are 
using regional networks? 

A. Regional network representatives 
report an increasing number of nation- 
al advertisers signing up. Here's a 
smattering of some of the new land 



..Id 



er I accounts: 



70 



SPONSOR 



Dominating 
Coverage 

THE ONLY STATION IN MICHIGAN THAT DOMINATES A COVER- 
AGE OF FIVE STATES IN ADDITION TO INDUSTRIAL DETROIT. 

"I 50,000 WATTS CLEAR CHANNEL 

The most powerful station in Michigan. 

O MICHIGAN, OHIO, INDIANA, PENNSYLVANIA, NEW YORK 
The only station in Michigan with this 97 county coverage. 

O 98,321,984 ESTIMATED POPULATION IN THE AREA 
The only station in Michigan able to cover this audience. 

A The only .station in Michigan that can do so much for the 
advertiser at so low a cost per inquery. 

Columbia Broadcasting System Nationally Represented by Edward Petry & Co. 

50,000 WATTS 







760 ^mmm.~^ -m. -m dial 

G. A. RICHARDS HARRY WISMER 

Chairman of the Vice President and V 

Board HI General Manager V 

RADIO — America's Greatest Advertising Medium 

17 JULY 1950 • 71 



spot 



NO PHONEY FIGURES 

No. We won't bother you with picked 
statistics. But a note to us will get you 
a long list of satisfied clients whom 
you may check for yourself. 




-^V^ 



Why NOT 


avail 


yourself of th 


3 TOP 


TALENT w 


hich 


transcribed s 


10WS 


give you at 


such 


LOW COST? 





If you use SPOT 
RADIO, why NOT 
assure yourself of a 
uniform, tested pro- 
gram in each market 
you're selling? 



Let Us Quote You the LOW RATES for these TELEWAYS 



Transcribed Programs: 

• MOON DREAMS 

156 1 5-Min. Musical Programs 

• DANGER! MR. DANFIELD 
26 30-Min. Mystery Programs 

• BARNYARD JAMBOREE 

52 30-Min. Musical Programs 



TOM. DICK & HARRY 

156 1 5-Min. Musical Programs 
STRANGE ADVENTURE 

260 5-Min. Dramatic Programs 
CHUCK WAGON JAMBOREE 

131 1 5-Min. Musical Programs 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

156 I5-Min. Hymn Programs 



RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 
156 I5-Min. Musical Program 

STRANGE WILLS 

26 30-Min. Dramatic Programs 

FRANK PARKER SHOW 
132 I5-Min. Musical Programs 



For PROFITABLE Transcribed Shows, It's 

TELEWAYS RADIO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



8949 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 46. Calif. 



Phone CRestview 67238 — BRadshaw 21447 



TOPEKA 




A Metropolitan 

Market MAIjll 
NOW 



WREN 




FIRST ALL DAY" 

ABC 

5000 WATTS 



& CO. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



Within the last two months, Stude- 
baker. Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. and 
Lydia Pinkham have begun to adver- 
tise on Don Lee: on previously were 
American Home Products (Anacin, 
Kolynos I : Grove: Dolcin; Miles Labs 
(Alka Seltzer), to name a few. 

Comparatively new on the Yankee 
Network are Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, 
and Dolcin. Long-time sponsors in- 
clude Lever Bros.: Corn Products; 
MacGowan Educator Crax; Hudson 
Paper: Maltex; Old Gold: Heinz. 

The Tobacco Network has recently 
welcomed Block Drug Co.; Lydia 
Pinkham : Bristol - Myers ( \ italis, 
Ipana). 

Q. Will regional networks expand, 
gain greater validity as radio spot 
grows? 

A. Regional networks, from all indica- 
tions, have already begun to benefit 
from the trend towards spot. Repre- 
sentatives report noticeably improved 
business in the past year or so. Some 
predict even better business to come. 
The regionals allow the advertiser to 
use spot on an extended schedule, 
cover more territory at lower rates 
than he could with the same individ- 
ual stations, and still get the same high 
local concentration. 



Q. How will TV affect the region- 
al networks? 

A. In this first year that TV has been 
in really full swing, there is every in- 
dication that regional network sales 
are holding their own. and more, 
against the influx of TV in the big 
metropolitan areas. One reason for 
this is that a great number of the re- 
gional net stations are heard outside 
the areas where TV can be effectively 
received. For example, 22 out of the 
28 Yankee Network stations are in 
non-TA localities. Another reason, say 
experts, is that the big networks, by 
and large, duplicate the coverage of 
I \ advertising: advertisers are, there- 
fore, using daytime spot to supple- 
ment their nighttime TV and reach 
market- previously glossed over. Vi ith 
the big chunks taken out of the ad 
budget by T\ . advertisers are looking 
for the most economical buys for their 
radio money and for flexibility, such 
as the regional networks offer. 

From indications so far, the advent 
of TV is actually proving to be a bless- 
ing to the regional networks. 



11 



SPONSOR 



Were £ err if! 

All We Can Deliver Is 



of Texas 

(Population-wise and Dollar-wise) 



l/ 2 Millivolt Daytime 

Coverage 

ZZ Permanent Lines 



KCMC 




KFJZ (Key) 


Fort Worth 


WRR 




Dallas 


KRRV 




Sherman 


KPLT 




Paris 


KCMC 




Texarkana 


KFRO 




Longview 


KGVL 




Greenville 


KRBC 




Abilene 


KBWD 




Brownwood 


KGKL 




San Angelo 


KBST 




Big Spring 


KCRS 




Midland 


KTHT 




Houston 


WACO 




Waco 


KNOW 




Austin 


*KMAC 




San Antonio 


*KABC 




San Antonio 


kr;o 


San 


McAllen 


*Only one 


Antonio Station 




to be use 


d. 







1,270 Kc. 


5,000 W 


1,310 " 


5,000 " 


910 " 


1,000 " 


1,490 " 


250 " 


1,230 " 


250 " 


1,370 " 


1,000 " 


1,400 " 


250 " 


1,470 " 


5,000 " 


1,380 " 


1,000 " 


960 " 


5,000 " 


1,490 " 


250 " 


550 " 


5,000 " 


790 " 


5,000 " 


1,460 " 


1,000 " 


1,490 " 


250 " 


1,240 " 


250 " 


680 " 


50,000 " 


910 " 


1,000 " 



MBS 
MBS 
MBS 
ABC 
ABC 
ABC 
MBS 
ABC 
MBS 
ABC 
ABC 
ABC 
MBS 
ABC 
ABC 
MBS 
ABC 
MBS 



TEXAS 



18 Stations 



250 Watts to 
. % Millivolt 



50,000 Watts . . . % Mill 
Daytime Coverage of 
90% of Texas! 




NETWORK 

1201 W. Lancaster 
FORT WORTH, TEXAS 



17 JULY 1950 



73 



FM STATION OPERATORS! 



r HO Nt 

,809 






Kadi© 



Station 



•:."! 



K ttenti° n . ois 
' Cnicafe°' oI the 

broadcast an e»W> r 

t.ear Sir . ^ *ro uiners ^ ^ 

w , n tames ° n aU ,, « us ^° 

Ln corporate farffi c i 

tw ^ offie fe Madis° nV1 sl Louis 

5M5^Sf" t8K l tor »•" ts \° UR 



PRO! 



,^1« G 



The Zenith Distributor in your territory is anxious to 
work with you to get more good FM sets throughout your listening area ... to build bigger, 
better audience for you. Get in touch with him now ... or write direct to Advertising Manager 



ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION • 6001 Dickens • Chicago, Illinois 




74 



SPONSOR 



spot 



Transit radio 



Q. Are national advertisers buying 
transit radio? 

A. A June report listed 88 national 
and regional sponsors using the medi- 
um compared with 78 the previous 
March, and 40 in January. 

Among national and regional ad- 
vertisers using the medium (many on 
a test basis) are Bristol-Myers; Miles 
Laboratories; Swift & Company; Fan- 
ny Farmer Candy Stores; Best Foods; 
Ladies' Home Journal; Pequot Mills; 
Hallmark Greeting Cards; Ford, Chev- 
rolet and Plymouth dealers; Bond 
Stores; Bankers Life and Casualty Co.; 
Bauer & Black; Manhattan Soap Co.; 
Household Finance Corporation; Gen- 
eral Baking Company; United Fruit 
Company; Arthur Murray Dance Stu- 
dios; Gruen Watch Company; Felt- 
man & Curme Shoes; Helene Curtis 
Cosmetics. 

The medium is limited at present to 
21 cities; but deals are cooking for 
additional franchises and eventually all 
of the nation's top markets may be cov- 
ered. Some advertisers are holding 
back till there's a greater network of 
cities; others have found it paying off 
on a spot basis and for test campaigns. 

Q. Is transit radio expensive? 

A. The best answer to this is in re- 
sults-per-dollar-invested. Transit radio 
has a flock of success stories ranging 
from good to sensational (see SPONSOR 
27 February 1950). Here are two ex- 
amples: 

In Evansville, Ind., WWML, the 
transit radio station, upped a leading 
dentifrice's share of this test market 
47% in 10 weeks. 

A leading food manufacturer started 
a campaign of 12 announcements a 
week for a shortening on KPRC, Hous- 
ton's transit radio station, and in seven 
months scored a sales increase of 51% ; 
a brand not using the medium had on- 
ly a 2% increase. 

Announcements used in the two in- 
stances cited were the 65-word mes- 
sages which are the medium's basic 
commodity. Rates for these announce- 
ments are calculated by most stations 
I for maximum frequency) at $0.75 per 
thousand riders during class "A" time 
(rush hours), and at $1.00 for hours 
in which there is less traffic. 



WE'RE IN THE MIDDLE 

- and PROUD of it! 

WE DELIVER 



FROM THE CENTER 

of 

^SOUTH ERN 
^CALIFORNIA'S 

RADIO DIAL 



4i 



m I If Tim LOS ANGELES 
tV* RrVU CALIFORNIA 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Joseph Hershey McCillvra 



THE RADIO VOICE OF 



(Eljje j&rmrtoit (States 

SCRANTON. PA. 

THE 

HIGH SPOT 

IN RADIO 

For The 

GREAT 

ANTHRACITE 

MARKET! 




C3h 



!~\ 



\ 



THE B0LLING COMPANY 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



Mr. Hugh Lucas 

Foote, Cone, and B elding 

Chicago, Illinois 

Dear Hugh: 

When folks thinks uv radio in 
West Virgiuny 
they thinks first 
wvW CHS. 
They's many 
reasons, but one 
uv th' mostest 
important is th' 
jack t h e t 
WCHS fellers 
gits out an' does 
thin's. Arr man- 
ager, John T. 
Gelder, has jest 
been 'pointed 
chairman uv th' 
1950 Community 
Chest drive in 
Charleston. 
West Virgin uy. 
an' arr permo- 
shun man, Har- 
ry Brawley, has 
jest been 'lected 
District Gover- 
nor uv th' Lions 
Club! Yessir, 
Hugh, arr fellers 
keeps WCHS in 

the public eye all th' time, an thet's 

mighty important tcr folks like you! 
Yrs. 
Algy 

WCHS 
Charleston, W. Va. 




17 |ULY 1950 



75 




FLASH! MIDWEST DEALER SPENDS $600 FOR 
RADIO CAMPAIGN, GETS TWICE THE RESULTS 
BROUGHT BY $3,000 CAMPAIGN IN ANOTHER 
MEDIUM. 

FLASH! PACIFIC NORTHWEST STORE FINDS RADIO 
DEVELOPS TWICE THE STORE TRAFFIC DELIVERED 
BY COMPETING MEDIUM, MEASURED ON DOLLAR- 
FOR-DOLLAR BASIS. 



FLASH! 40% OF STORE CUSTOMERS NAME RADIO 
ADVERTISING AS REASON FOR COMING TO 
STORE. NEXT BEST MEDIUM, 21%. 

FLASH! RADIO ADVERTISING ACCOUNTS FOR 
54% OF DOLLAR VOLUME OF SALES IN STORES 
CHECKED. NEXT BEST MEDIUM, 20%. 







Have you noticed the many exciting case histories currently published on the 
effectiveness of spot radio? 

All this evidence of success makes wonderful reading — but it's an old 
story to advertisers on Westinghouse stations! 

Just to check the record, we reviewed our files and found a gold mine of 
confirming evidence. Recent examples, already published elsewhere: 



^a 

Cr 






On Pittsburgh's Using KYW as the On Portland's KEX. Thanks to Boston's 



KDKA, one Farm only advertising me- 
Hour advertiser spent dium in Philadelphia, 
$500 on time, got a diaper manufacturer 
$20,000 worth of or- saw sales jump 52'7 
ders. (Reported Au- in nine weeks (Re- 
gust 17, 1949.) ported June 1, 1949) 



one announcement for W'BZ, writes a berry 

dressed poultry sold grower, "radio in- 

two Ions of assorted creased my revenue 

birds. (Reported Feb- over 50%." ( Report- 

ruary 1, 1950. I ed July 27. 19 19. I 



— <&5d^-- 



With four short mes- 
sages on Fort Waynes 
WOWO, a hardware 
company tripled sales 
of power mowers, 
sellirrg hundreds. ( Re- 
ported May 29, 1950.) 



What's more, we're helping other advertisers write comparable case histories 
right now! To boost your sales in six of the nation's leading markets, look into 
the program-building and audience-building capacities of Westinghouse stations. 
Ask the man from Free & Peters! 

WESTINGHOUSE RADIO STATIONS Inc 
KDKA • KYW • KEX • WBZ • WBZA • WOWO • WBZ-TV 

National Representatives. Free & Peters, except lor WBZ-TV; lor WBZ-TV, NBC Spot Sales 



75 



SPONSOR 



Q. What are other pertinent facts 
about transit radio? 

A. Audience: Bus and trolley riders 
constitute a "counted" audience, since 
transit companies know the number of 
riders on their systems during any 
hour or half-hour in the day. Spon- 
sors can also know ivho is hearing their 
messages, since each station, with the 
aid of transit statistics, can furnish 
breakdowns on rider occupations, ages, 
and sex. 

Home listening: Advertisers pay for 
the commuting audience, but FM tran- 
sit programs are heard by a growing 
number of home listeners, according to 
Hooper and other audience surveys. 
An American Research Bureau diary 
study in Washington. D. C, for exam- 
ple, showed 23.800 home listeners 
tuned to the transit station, WWDC- 
FM, during a typical week for an av- 
erage of 66.5 minutes a day. During 
the same period. 47.600 transit riders 
listened to WWDC-FM daily for an 
average of 22 minutes a day. 

Programing: Basic ingredient is lis- 
tenable popular tunes. Other elements 
are capsuled news, with accent on lo- 
cal items; time signals; weather re- 
ports; sports scores. Commercials are 
spaced at least five minutes apart. 

Media acceptance : Public confidence 
and acceptance is fostered by the pub- 
lic service policies of all transit radio 
managements; they are making their 
facilities available for emergency an- 
nouncements and instructions, as dur- 
ing fires, explosions, storms, and simi- 
lar civic emergencies. The system is 
being integrated into national defense 
plans by the nation's top planners, for 
announcements over transit systems 
will be one of the quickest ways of 
reaching masses of people in industria 
centers. Such values tend to insure the 
permanence of the medium. One of the 
earliest and most consistent foes of 
transit radio has been the St. Louis 
Post Dispatch (a competitor for ad- 
vertising dollars). This paper recent- 
ly conceded editorially that the people 
of St. Louis like music and news while 
they ride. 

A series of decisions by public and 
judicial agencies has upheld transit ra- 
dio's right to operate against the snip- 
ing of rival advertising media and the 
handful of people who think radio is 
terrible, period. The joyful chortle of 
a transit radio official following favor- 
able public opinion polls and judicial 
rulings seems to sum up the situation 
to date: 



spot 






What a Game.' 

they nosed us out, and, boy, it was close 



MORNING AFTERNOON EVENING ENTIRE 



STATION A 



WAIR 



STATION B 



35.9 



37.3 



24.5 



40.8 



39.3 



5.1 



50.8 



37.9 



DAYTIME 
STATION 



43.9 



38.3 



Conlan for April, 1950 



but 



en a COST-PER-LISTENER basis WAIR is the perennial leader in the 
Winston-Salem League. 



QUARTER HOUR DAYTIME RATES 



STATION A 



WAIR 



STATION B 



$35.00 



20.00 



30 00 




NORTH CAROLINA 
National Rep: The Walker Co. 



Let WAIR bat for you. We'll make a hit every time. 




TRIBUNE TOWER OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Represented Nationally by Burn-Smith 



17 JULY 1950 



77 



spot 



What it Means to be TWENTY! 




For TWENTY YEARS KMLB has 
served this market with a remark- 
able record of success for its ad- 
vertisers. Some of our very first 
advertisers (on KMLB consistently for 
20 years) are still with us. Many 
more have been with KMLB exclu- 
sively for 5, 8, 10 and 12 years. 
Top notch programming, ethical 
business principles, and thorough 
and continuous merchandising has 
kept KMLB the Number One station 
for TWENTY YEARS. Remember, the 
isolated Monroe Market cannot be 
covered from New Orleans or 
Shreveport. Therefore, you need 
KMLB - available to 97,410 radio 
homes or 83.4% of the total families 
in this area. 




NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

THE TAYLOR CO., INC. 



"Transit radio is here to stay, and 
its getting bigger every day." 



Storecasting 



Q. Who is buying Store-casting? 
A. More than 250 leading national 
and regional grocery products are us- 
ing the Storecast System, including 
such brands as: Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, 
Maxwell House Coffee, Libby's Baby 
Foods, Minute Maid Orange Juice, My- 
T-Fine Desserts, Schaefer Beer, Quak- 
er Oats. Post Cereals, Beech-Nut. 

Q. What are the pertinent facts 
regarding Storecasting? 

A. With the addition of the New York 
operation (now pending), four-year- 
old Storecast will be servicing 630 su- 
permarkets in five major areas: Pitts- 
burgh (KQV-FM), Southern New 
England (WMMW-FM in Meridan, 
Conn.), Philadelphia (W1BG-FM), 
Chicago (WEHS-FMl. and metropoli- 
tan New York (WIFE, pending FCC 
approval I . 

Q. What does Storecasting cost in 
relation to results? 

A. The cost yardstick is used on a per- 
1,000-customer basis, and measures 
store customers rather than home FM 
listeners. The actual cost to the adver- 
tiser for one announcement is 90c per 
1.000 customer listeners. For example, 
were an advertiser to use 24 announce- 
ments per week in all the major areas, 
his cost for the service would be about 
$700 weekly. The stores themselves 
pay nothing. Typical of Storecast ser- 
vice results is that of a known-brand 
salad dressing. During a 12-month pe- 
riod, store shipments of the dressing 
averaged 124% more to 25 Storecast- 
serviced supermarkets than to 25 non- 
Storecast-serviced supermarkets in the 
same area and under comparable cir- 
cumstances of size and volume. Ac- 
cording to Stanley Joseloff, president 
of Storecasting, ". . . volume goes up 
<>(•'. for the products which are pro- 
moted by Storecasting." 

Q. What does Storecast plan for 
the future? 

A. Storecast's tie-in with stations us- 
ing FM music for subscription pur- 
poses foreshadows the 
many new markets. 



opening 



ot 



78 



SPONSOR 




They've rolled up their sleeves 



Radio networks in a 
TV era 



Q. What's happening to radio net- 
works in a TV era? 

A. A lot of things are happening — 
but nothing really alarming, despite 
all the funereal predictions. All four 
major webs (CBS, NBC, MBS, and 
ABC) report better-than-average busi- 
ness, with bright prospects for fall and 
winter. CBS, at this writing, reports 
no daytime availabilities at all. Mu- 
tual says that virtually all of its spon- 
sors are booked solid at least through 
the end of 1950. though it's glad to ac- 
commodate others. ABC has some 
"choice" weekday evening time for 
sale, and a few late afternoon availa- 
bilities. NBC will undoubtedly be well- 
filled by the time "hiatus season" is 
over. The evening net air will be well 
sponsored, with many low-price pack- 
ages and fewer expensive ones. 



Q. What about the trend to day- 
time radio? 

A. There is a trend to daytime, and it 
is continuing — but like most radio 
trends, people tend to exaggerate it in 
conversation out of all proportion to 
the facts. There isn't any "exodus" 
out of nighttime radio. It's more of a 
shift of programing, with the night net 
shows less costly; later maybe time 
costs will reduce too. The situation is 
one which underlines the absurdity of 
talking in such absolutes as "night- 
time radio is dead — television has 
killed it." This is obvious nonsense. 
Working on fevered imaginations, it 
can create a very similar type of panic 
fear among advertisers — who live with 
anxiety even in the most settled times. 
If the sponsor of a nighttime radio 
show that happens to be opposite a 
lop-rated TV program decides to shift 
into a daytime slot, this is only pru- 
dent. But how many TV shows can 
exert such influence? 



17 JULY 1950 



Q. Does this imply that network 
radio as a whole won't be affected 
markedly by TV? 

A. No! Television is already exerting 
a strong influence on network radio, 
and video's effect will be increasingly- 
evident next year and the year after 
that. But for the most part, this in- 
fluence will be salutary. 

Q. How's that? 

A. The networks, in some 20 years 
of existence, have become the fat cats 
of the radio industry. The competi- 
tion of television will trim the fat from 
network radio operations, and give the 
webs a lean and hungry look. The bus- 
iness plums will be there but more 
hands will be reaching for them. Net- 
work programing and operations will, 
of necessity, improve in the shakedown 
process. The advertiser, always a Very 
Important Personage to the network, 
will be a bigger man than ever before. 
All the networks are reviewing their 



79 




'The Fat Man" (ABC) is typical of nighttime favorites shifting sponsorship. Sold to Camel 



program policies in the light of TV 
gains. It's a foregone conclusion that 
many current program patterns will 
soon be old-hat. and that new and 
fresher ideas will emerge to replace 
them. Closer liaison between network 
programing and sales departments will 
be an essential part of the picture. At 
NBC. for example, the networks new 
program chief, Charles Barry, has or- 
-.iiii/ril a "-air- sen ice Mali to func- 
tion within the framework of the pro- 
gram department. 



Q. What kind of radio shows are 
apt to stand up best against TV 
competition? 

A. The obvious answer is probably as 
accurate as any prognostication at this 
time: any show whose appeal is alto- 
gether or largely to the ear. Or, to 
put it another way. any show that 
won't suffer from the absence of vis- 
ual appeal. Before very long there will 
be no place in network radio for the 
big, and expensive, variety show, ex- 
cept possibly on a simulcast basis. 
Many dramatic shows fall into the on- 
the-fence category. Some will evolve 
naturally into a video format. Others, 
of the psychological thriller or what's- 
the-solution schools, having a strong 
imaginative appeal, should continue to 
thrive in radio. Speaking generally, 
most types of "talk" programs will 



hold up well — news programs above 
all; commentary; forums and discus- 
sions. And so will music and d.j. pro- 
grams. These are the "divided atten- 
tion" types, with which television can- 
not hope to compete. Then there's 
sports, which a good announcer can 
make ear-appetizing. No one has come 
up yet with a satisfactory system for 
watching a video show and plaving a 
bridge hand, or reading, or basting a 
roast, at the same time. There's a 
whole swarm of daytime women's of- 
ferings that will continue to hold up 
very well. 

Q. What about the size of radio 
audiences? Isn't television eating 
into it? 

A. Sure. Like a termite eating a grand 
piano. It's an awfully big meal. By- 
last January, there were more than 
85,000.000 radio sets in use through- 
out the U. S. (source: NAB-RTMA sur- 
vey). A recent (June 1) estimate of 
total television sets in use was 6,214.- 
(li)i) (source: NBC-TV Sales Planning 
and Research). And in 1950 main 
more radio sets are being sold than in 
1949. Figures aside, let's look al it 
this way: are millions of radio listen- 
ers going to abandon overnight — or 
even in a year or two — listening habits 
they have formed over a period of five. 
10, 20, and even 25 years? Are they 



going to abandon what Fortune called 
in 1949 America's favorite recreation? 
Obviously not. But it is true (and we 
don't need the confirmation of research 
studies to tell us I that they will become 
more selective in their radio listening, 
and therefore radio programing will 
have to improve and be altered to meet 
this heightened selectivitv. 

Q. How about the rate outlook — 
is it likely that nighttime radio 
network rates will decrease be- 
cause of television competition? 

A. It's always risky to attempt a pre- 
diction of what will happen to rates, 
even in view of competitive pressure. 
But the networks themselves see little 
chance of reduced nighttime rates in 
the near future. To arguments that tel- 
evision is eating into radio audiences, 
the networks can reply with justice that 
such isolated losses are wiped out by 
the steady growth of the overall radio 
audience. Thus if nighttime rate-cut- 
ting does begin among the networks, 
it will be due to a competitive pinch 
rather than to any question of "fewer 
listeners per dollar." 



Q. Will daytime radio rates in- 
crease? 

A. This seems likelier, though again 
it's difficult to predict. The over-agi- 
tated rush of some advertisers to get 
into daytime radio, out of reach of the 
Big Bad Video Wolf, may mean that 
before long they'll be bidding daytime 
radio rates up against themselves. 
Choice daytime availabilities are al- 
ready getting scarce. The law of sup- 
ply and demand applies to radio time 
values as to everything else. 

Q. Where would a thoughtful net- 
work advertiser be likely to find 
some unexpectedly green pas- 
tures? 

A. In nighttime hours — despite the 
calamih -howlers. Some advertisers, 
glancing nervously over their shoul- 
ders at TV, have leaped from nighttime 
to daytime radio without looking. Oth- 
ers will follow suit, some with good 
reason but many in pure panic. This 
will open a number of perfectly good 
nighttime network availabilities, into 
which an alert advertiser can move. 
One advertiser's poison (especially if 
I he label is undeserved) can be an- 
other advertiser's meat. Item: The Pet 
Milk Co. will sponsor Fibber McGee & 



80 



SPONSOR 





Pet Milk has picked up Fibber McGee and Molly where Johnson left off Burns and Allen lost sponsor when Amm-i-dent turned to daytime air 



Molly this fall on Tuesday nights at 
9:30 on NBC. S. C. Johnson & Co. 
will drop the show. 

Q. Is there a trend toward shorter 
radio network time buys? 

A. It hasn't reached "trend" propor- 
tions yet. but it may. The networks 
report that most sponsors, because of 
the general uncertainty which is stem- 
ming from TV, have raised the ques- 
tion of contract duration. Few if any 
network advertisers, however, have 
asked as yet for concessions from the 
usual 13-week cycle. If and when they 
do, it's probable that the networks, 
rather than risk losing sales, will per- 
mit more contractual elasticity than is 
common today. Short-term contracts 
are not new to networks; you could al- 
ways buy one-hour on Christmas Day 
if the time were available. 



Agencies using network 
radio most 



Q. Which agencies are most ac- 
tive in network radio? 

A. According to dollar billings these 
agencies are most active in the net- 
works. I All agencies are listed on a 
numerical basis with the exception of 
CBS lenders.) 



ABC: Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample; J. 
Walter Thompson; McCann-Erickson: 
Lennen & Mitchell; Hutchins; Leo Bur- 
nett; Biow; William Weintraub; Kud- 
ner: Young & Rubicam. 

MBS: Cecil & Presbrey; Wade; J. 
Walter Thompson; McCann-Erickson; 
Sherman & Marquette; Neal D. Ivey; 
Gardner; Benton & Bowles; Kudner; 
Grey Advertising. 

NBC: Dancer - Fitzgerald - Sample: 
BBD&O; Benton & Bowles; Wade; 
Biow; Newell-Emmett; Duane Jones; 
William Esty; Compton; J. Walter 
Thompson. 

CBS: Dancer - Fitzgerald - Sample; 
Foote, Cone & Belding; BBD&O; 
Young & Rubicam; Compton; Newell- 
Emmett; Benton & Bowles; Ward 
Wheelock; Ruthrauff & Ryan; Mc- 
Cann-Erickson. 



Giveaways 



Q. Exactly what is a "giveaway" 
program? 

A. Every giveaway show is an audi- 
ence-participation program I there has 
to be someone there to cart away the 
mountain of prizes). But not ever) 
audience-participation program gives 
things away, although most have some 
kind of prize, be it ever so small. 



Program men find it hard to draw a 
definite line between audience-partici- 
pation shows which throw in a prize 
for added interest and the giveaways 
which add entertainment to maintain 
listener appeal. There is one general 
rule of thumb, however. There has to 
be a reasonably even balance between 
entertainment and prizes to sustain a 
giveaway program. If you subtract 
from one, you have to add to the other. 

Q. What are the trends in give- 
away programing? 

A. Today's giveaways are stable mem- 
bers of the broadcast family. New ones 
are occasionally added, old ones leave; 
but there is no noticeable dip or rise 
in the total number. This is the ma- 
jority opinion, with only NBC dissent- 
ing. NBC sees giveaways gradually 
dying. 

CBS has eight giveaways on radio. 
three on TV. ABC and NBC each have 
seven on radio and one on television. 
Mutual trails the other networks with 
five on radio. Indicative of their stav- 
ing power is the fact that at least hall 
of these 32 giveaway shows have been 
on over two years. 

Two minor trends in giveawav : 

1. The size of network jackpots is 
steadily being sliced. 

2. Merchandise is being increasing- 
ly favored for prizes. This cuts costs. 



17 JULY 1950 



81 



network 



WFBL 





New Highs 



in Radio Listening 
in SYRACUSE 



HOOPER 


S&cvie-o^- 


'Radax- s4u<Ue*tce A P R 1 L - M A Y 


1 950 




WFBL 


Station B 


Station C 


Station D 


Station E 


Morning 


45.7 


17.0 


18.2 


8.1 


10.1 


Afternoon 


37.6 


18.9 


16.6 


16.1 


9.7 


Evening 


31.1 


26.8 


16.4 


14.0 


11.0 



WFBL delivers 17.8% more audience in 
Syracuse daytime than the next two 
most popular stations combined! 



FREE& PETERS will beglad 
to show you the complete 
quarter-hour breakdown. 



*f¥ene& tAe 'DtxyUnte Second in 

(C. E. HOOPER — December 1949 thru April 


1950) 


Quarter-Hour Dc 


lytime Pe 


riods with 


ratings of: 




WFBL 


Station B 


Station C 


Station D Station E 


10 or Better 


8 











7.5 or Better 


13 











5 or Better 


29 


10 


10 


1 


Average Rating 


7.11 


3.82 


3.69 


2.52 1.47 




WFBL 



• Syracuse, N. Y. 



Your Best Buy-To-Sell Medium In Syracuse! 




82 



Q. How do giveaway programs 
compare with other types both rat- 
ing-wise and cost-wise? 

A. Except for the Groucho Marx 
show, You Bet Your Life (De Soto- 
Plymouth Dealers), which will move 
from CBS to NBC next fall, no give- 
away show is presently among Niel- 
sen's top 10. You Bet Your Life rates 
ninth, can hardly be considered a typi- 
cal giveaway in view of its strong com- 
edy appeal and small prizes. 

Giveaways, as a class, compare most 
closely with mystery-detective shows as 
to rating and cost. Ratings average 
about 10 Nielsen; costs range from 
$3,000 to $5,000 on network. 

Q. What is presently available on 
networks in the way of giveaway 
programs? 

A. ABC has the following open: 

1. Quick as a Flash — three half- 
hours at 11:30 to 12:00 a.m. week- 
days. Cost $4,350 for three half-hours. 

2. Stop the Music — one 15-minute 
segment from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. Sun- 
days. Cost $3,350 for 15-minutes. 

3. Bride and Groom — a half-hour 
segment five times a week from 3:00 to 
3:30 p.m. weekdays. Cost $5,000 for 
five half-hours. 

CBS has the following open: 

1. Winner Take All — five half-hours 
from 3:30 to 4:00 p.m. weekdays. On 
summer sustaining. 

2. Earn Your Vacation — one half-hour 
from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m. Sundays. Cost 
$3,360 for a half-hour. 

3. Rate Your Mate — one half-hour 
from 7:00 to 7:30 p.m. Saturdays (be- 
ginning 1 July 1950) . Cost $4,200 plus 
an average of $400 prize money a 
week. 

NBC has only two such shows of its 
own: Hollywood Calling and $1,000 
Reward. Nothing is available. 

Mutual Broadcasting Co. has the fol- 
lowing open: 

1. Ladies Fair — 15-minutes of a half- 
hour show, 2:00 to 2:30 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. Cost $2,500 per week 
for 15-minutes. 

2. Queen for a Day — 15-minutes of 
a half-hour show, 2:30 to 3:00 p.m. 
weekdays. Cost $2,500 per week for 
15-minutes. 

3. Take a Number — one half-hour 
open from 8:30 to 9:00 p.m. Satur- 
days. Cost $1,500 for the half-hour 
per week. 

4. True or False — one half-hour open 
from 9:00 to 9:30 p.m. Saturdays. 
Cost $1,250 for the half-hour per week. 

SPONSOR 




No need to shout. The figures speak for themselves. 

The Broadcast Measurement Bureau has just released the final 
circulation figures of Study No. 2 and NBC continues in first place 
with the largest audience in all radio — reaching more people than any 
other single advertising medium. (90% of agency timebuyers use 
BMB as their basic source of information in comparing network 
circulation according to a recent independent research spot check.) 

Network radio is bigger than ever — as big as America — and the 
BMB results show that each week, day or night, more than 7 out of 10 
families listen to NBC. These findings give NBC a weekly audience 
advantage of over l 1 /-. million homes during the day and more than 
2V-> million at night over the second network. And the greater the 

©intensity of listening, the greater is NBC's 
relative superiority over the next network. 



America's No. 1 Advertising Medium 

A service of Radio Corporation of America 



network 




SALES 

AIN'T 
POPPING 

LOUD IN 

CORK (Ky-)'- 

« do you any good to p»t 
th£ adverting -rews ° ca9e of PoHyana- 

uis , Cork S .u^y sale9 . g eyser! 

doogh to produce ^ ^UviUe 

Bnt if Cork's crew eauH be P y ^ ^ ^ 
Retail Tradiug Area eer » ^ ^^ ^ 
lu eky aud ludiaua eounUe aod ^^ 
bigh-proof people, b« *« ^ ^ ^ re9l „f 

a9m ueUbu 9 i»e 9S and»ou^ vE ^ ^ „. 

tbe ^te co^ed- ^ ^.^ 
Sh aH «e start pourmg J 



HBC AFFILIATE 
FREE & PETERS. INC 



5000 WRITS ■ 9^0 KC 
% HAT.0NM REPRESENTATIVES 



All prices given are net cost; they 
do not include 15% agency commis- 



sion. 



Q. What kind of prizes are being 
used on giveaways? 

A. Merchandise is very popular with 
sponsors because it keeps costs down. 
Except for "exotic" prizes like vacation 
trips or automobiles, cash is favored 
by contestants, according to prize ex- 
perts like the Reuben H. Donnelley 
Corp. 

Most network and local shows ob- 
tain merchandise prizes at 15% of reg- 
ular retail price through merchandis- 
ing concerns. Three of the top com- 
panies which provide merchandise 
prizes through cooperation with manu- 
facturers are: 

Richard S. Robbins Co., 551 Fifth 
Avenue, NYC, serves some 500 sta- 
tions. Prizes, Inc., 130 East 44th 
Street. NYC, serves about 200 stations. 
V.I. P. Service, Inc., 1775 Broadway, 
NYC, serves about 50 stations and sev- 
en network giveaway shows. 

These are some of the companies 
who donate prizes for publicity plugs: 
R.C.A., Westinghouse, Longines, Gen- 
eral Mills. Dunhill, The Toni Co., An- 
chor Hocking, and William Rogers. 



Network times 
available 



Q. What are the current time 
availabilities among the networks? 

A. NBC is sold solid in the daytime 
at this writing, and has the following 
nighttime availabilities: Sunday, 6.30- 
7.30; Monday, 10-11; Thursday, 9- 
9.30; Friday, 8-9; Saturday, 8-8.30. 
Mutual has the 2-2.15 p.m. and 2.30- 
2.45 p.m. segments of Ladies Fair and 
Queen for a Day, across the board, 
and the following nighttime availabili- 
ties: Monday, 8.30-8.55; 9.30; 9.30- 
10; Tuesdays, 8-8.30; 9-9.30; 9.30-10; 
Wednesday, 8-8.30; 8.30-8.55; 9-9.30; 
9.30-10; Thursday. 8-8.30; 9-9.30; 
Friday, 8.30-8.55; Saturday, 7.30-8; 
8.30-9: 919.30; Sundav. 7.30-8; 8.30- 
9: 9-9.30; 9.30-10. CBS is sold solid 
daytime and has these nighttime avail- 
abilities: Tuesday, 10-11; Wednesday, 
9.30-11; Friday.' 8-10; 10.30-11: Sat- 
urady, 10.15-10.30: Sunday. 10.30-11: 
i \ ItC's list of availabilities bad not 
been cleared for release bv the net- 
work at presstime) . 




The WISL Service-Ad* illustrated at the right, appears in the SRDS 
monthly Radio Section. It offers the services of a successful independent 
radio station as an advertising medium. It uses simple, straight-forward, 
down-to-earth selling copy that worked so well in the early days of AM 
Radio . . . and works equally well today. It offers a program ... an 
audience with proved willingness to buy . . . tells what it costs to use the 
program . . . and where to buy it. 



Radio Station Operators: — You too can harness 
the influence of SRDS and make it work for you 
to increase national spot time sales, by telling 
Your Station's sales story in the SRDS Radio 
Section. 



£?S»i» 



STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE 

The National Authority I Walter E. Botthof 

Serving the Media-Buying Function / Publisher 

333 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, Illinois 

NEW YORK • LOS ANGELES 



^bottle. WcrtA 
...has a way 
with women! 

We've thrown surveys 
out of the window! 

WHY? B l.,u need 

them lo prove this program. We've 
checked cash registers instead . . - 
cash registers of local accounts that 
have iheir finger on the pulse of 
iheir advertising, 

On tlir program we have enthusi- 
astic local and national accounts who 
want to reach Mrs. Housewife who 
wants to know about local events, 
fashions, foods, and outstanding per- 
sonages who visit the area. 

At 11:30 every morning. Monday 
through Friday. Dottie Ward speaks 
in a down-to-earth manner about 
many things and products and gels 
a fine response. 

Success stories? Certainly! But 
why take your lime . . . ? The low 
cost allows you to experiment in a 
market thai likes good things. 

Our local family Retail Salea Fig- 
ure for 1948 was 14,512.00. That 
buys more than peanuts. 

COST: Only $25.00 per week of 
5 days — local and national accounts, 
same rale. Sold on weekly basis only. 
Minimum order— 13 weeks. 

WISL 

ROCK AND SUNBURT STREETS 

SHAMOKIN, PENNA. 



•p Service- Ads are ads that supplement listings in SRDS 
with information that sells by helping buyers buy. 



17 JULY 1950 



85 



piay 




PHILLIES 
and 

ATHLETICS 
Games on 



WDEL-TV WGAL-TV 

Wilmington, Del. Lancaster, Penna. 



Play Ball means that all Saturday home games of both 
Phillies and Athletics are telecast over WGAL-TV 
and WDEL-TV. This splendid baseball feature is important 
on two counts. First, because it has definite appeal in 
these two markets. Second, because it is only one of a great 
many special features which are the result of effective, 
long-range programming. These two stations are increasing 
their number of viewers constantly. They're keeping 
these growing audiences loyal and responsive through 
programs which are worthwhile and diversified. They offer 
TV advertisers an unusually fine opportunity for 
profitable business. Investigate. 

WDEL-TV— Wilmington, Delaware 

Only television station in Delaware — fifth market in per capita 
income in the nation. Brings viewers a clear picture, all 
NBC network shows. Excellent TV Test Market. 

WGAL-TV — Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Only TV station in this large, prosperous area of 
Pennsylvania. Presents the top shows of four networks: NBC, 
CBS, ABC and DuMont. Excellent TV Test Market. 

Steinman Stations — Clair R McCollough, General Manager 




NBC 



TV • Affiliates 



Represented by 

ROBERT MEEKER Associates 



CHICAGO • SAN FRANCISCO • NEW YORK • LOS ANGELES 



86 



SPONSOR 




Standing 
mom only 



Network TV scope 



Q. How much of the country's 
population can be reached in all 
62 TV markets? 

A. About 60%, if you count only the 
families within a 40-mile radius of 
each station (see TV coverage, page 
92 ) . Since this 40-mile radius is de- 
monstrably too conservative an esti- 
mate, it is safe to calculate that about 
two-thirds of the total population is in- 
cluded in TV's current 62 markets, 
which also account for about two- 
thirds of the nation's retail sales. 

About 6,500,000 sets now serve these 
areas. Each station in each market 
furnishes estimates of the number of 
sets in its service area. Both CBS and 
NBC research departments go to great 
effort to reconcile discrepancies in es- 
timates due to overlap and other prob- 

17 JULY 1950 



lems. NBC publishes its results in a 
monthly ''Data Chart" which has come 
to be regarded by the industry at large 
as the most authoritative estimate 
available now. 

It is interesting to note that TV is 
in 40 of the 42 U. S. cities with pop- 
ulations over a quarter of a million, 
and is in 40 of the 48 States. Of the 
29 markets covered by This Week, TV 
is in 27. The two exceptions are Port- 
land, Ore., and Denver, both caught in 
the FCC freeze. 

Q. When should an advertiser go 
into network television? 

A. That depends primarily upon his 
purpose. If he wants to protect a time 
spot, he'd better get in fast. For night- 
time TV it may be already too late — 
most openings available as this is writ- 
ten probably won't be by July 17. 
Even with the present limited num- 



ber of available stations, network tele- 
vision already penetrates enough top 
markets with enough sets (and enough 
evidence of sales impact) to justify any 
advertiser with the right product and 
distribution seriously considering the 
medium. 



Network TV rates 



Q. Can the advertiser going on the 
air this fall protect himself against 
rate increases by buying in July or 
August? 

A. Yes. in one instance. On ABC 
he is protected if the first broadcast of 
the show is effective not more than two 
months following the date the contract 
is signed. On NBC a sponsor who 
signed before 1 July is protected for 
six months following date of signing 



87 



TV 



contract; those signing alter 1 July 
must pay the new rates, but get six 
months protection. On both DuMont 
and CBS the protection is six months, 
but starts from date of the first broad- 
cast. If the rate increases on DuMont 
and CBS before start of the schedule, 
the sponsor pays the higher rate. 



Q. What percentage of nighttime 
rates are daytime rates? 

A. About .ill' , . 



Q. Where does the money for TV 
ad budgets come from? 

A. Sellers of the medium generally 
take the view that a TV appropriation 



The NBC-Hofstra study (see page 48 
of this issue I is the most comprehen- 
sive single roundup of such factors 
produced to date. 

Cost per thousand listeners has 
steadily dropped for all TV networks 
as numbers of stations and TV homes 
has increased. For example, on 1 Jul) 
1948 on the seven interconnected sta- 
tions of the NBC-TV network you 
could reach about 307.000 TV homes. 
The gross half hour evening rate was 
SI, 140; a cost per thousand viewers 
of $3.71. By July 1950 the number of 
stations had risen to 30. the gross eve- 
ning half hour rate to $9,975, and total 
TV homes to over 5,000.000; cost per 
thousand had fallen to $1.98. It is ob- 



radio there is BMB to help guide mer- 
chandising and promotion efforts and 
to help correlate with other media ef- 
forts. At present. TV sponsors haven't 
anything like this. Engineering cover- 
age contours, reports of set shipments, 
and station mail are the principle 
guides now to distribution and loca- 
tion of sets in a station area (see dis- 
cussion of TV coverage, page 92). 

Q. Where can an advertiser get 
information regarding creation of 
suitable TV announcements? 

A. Query your advertising agency 
first. There are dozens of organiza- 
tions, old and new, in the business of 
producing TV announcements; their 




COLGATE WILL BE TOP TV SPENDER THIS FALL WHEN CANTOR, ALLEN AND TWO OTHERS ALTERNATE IN HOUR-LONG SHOWS 



should be part of the advertising bud- 
get. Advertisers like P & G concur. 
"Let monies be allocated for TV to 
help accomplish the advertising objec- 
tive," is the way some experts put it. 
Its share of the budget, they reason, 
should be allocated from the total bud- 
iii-\. v\ith no question as to what spe- 
< ifi< budget it is to come from. The 
important adjustment here would seem 
In l>c more a matter of viewpoint than 
of bookkeeping. 

Q. How expensive is TV? 

A. While results are always the final 
answer, it is possible to indicate some 
of the factors bearing on the results. 



vious that cost per thousand will re- 
duce this fall and winter. 



When to use spot TV 



Q. Are there any differences be- 
tween spot radio and spot televi- 
sion of importance to a spot TV 
buyer? 

A. Yes. With TV there aren't the cov- 
erage differences resulting from tre- 
mendous ranges in power and frequen- 
cy found in radio. Programing is more 
important, especially in multiple TV 
station markets, than coverage. With 



competence varies drastically. The 
types of announcements possible are 
very great, and agency counsel on this 
point also is usually essential for best 
results. The Broadcast Advertising Bu- 
reau has recently released a booklet on 
this subject, sponsor has published 
several articles. 

Q. Can most stations provide ade- 
quate time for one-minute an- 
nouncements? 
A. No. 

Q. Should 20 second versions al- 
ways be built in case one-minute 
spots are not available? 



88 



SPONSOR 



TV 



A. No. Some products can't be ade- 
quately sold in 20 seconds. Expert 
advise of your agency and spot pro- 
duction specialists should be sought. 



TV .spot availabilities 
and costs 



Q. Are TV spot costs in line with 
other media? How do they com- 
pare with TV network? 

A. There's no direct way to compare 
TV spot costs with other media. In- 
directly comparison can be made 
through results. But no controlled ex- 
periments have been made on this ba- 
sis. Comparisons have been made be- 
tween TV spot and magazines on a cir- 
culation basis in markets with high TV 
penetration. The figures are slightly 
sensational for TV. Findings have been 
presented to advertisers to the accom- 
paniment of anguished protests of the 
magazines. Set penetration in a few 
top markets is just beginning to put 
the sight and sound medium on an 
equal circulation footing with local 
newspapers. 

Comparison with network TV is 
equally difficult because of the many 
possible bases for comparison. If his 
distribution warrants it. network TV 
can give him coverage ( including mer- 
chandising possibilities) which would 
cost more to get with spot announce- 
ments on all the same stations. On the 
other hand, with scattered distribution, 
TV spot might cover it with great sav- 
ing in waste circulation and the cost 
it represents. 

Q. Can an advertiser protect him- 
self in July and August against fall 
rate increases? Is there any stand- 
ard protection period on station 
rates? 

A. Yes. to both questions. But there 
are exceptions. Station polic) general- 
ly is to accept no orders more than 30 
days prior to date of the first broad- 
cast (football games might be an ex- 
ception!. The majority of stations 
guarantee the sponsor six months pro- 
tection from the effective date of the 
increase, but some stations extend pro- 
tection six months from start of the 
contract rather than from starting date 
of the increase. This means that some 
sponsors are put in the position of 
having to figure whether they would 
gain more by sitting tight to earn a 

17 JULY 1950 




Daytime TV makes bid for housewife's dollar with shows like Your Television Shopper (DuMont 



frequency discount, or cancel imme- 
diately and sign up again in order to 
take advantage of the six months pro- 
tection against an increase they know 
is coming up. Audience is mushroom- 
ing so fast in most areas that standard 
protection isn't yet possible. 

Q. Is there any logic behind the 
selection of six months as the pro- 
tection period? 

A. Yes. Stations figure that circula- 
tion is increasing generally at a rate 
which justifies an increase in their 
rates about every six months. 



Agencies using TV most 



Q. Which agencies lead in TV net- 
work placement? 

A. N. C. Rorabaugh lists Young & Ru- 
bicam as the network TV leader with 
nine programs on the air this spring. 
Others follow in somewhat this order: 
Young & Rubicam; J. Walter Thomp- 
son; McCann-Erickson: BBD&O; Max- 
on; Kudner; William Esty; Benton & 
Bowles; Dancer, Fitzgerald & Sample; 
N. W. Ayer; Doherty, Clifford & Shen- 
field: Kenyon & Eckhardt; Franklin 




Reps, like this CBS TV Sales Group, check stations on spot. Here they visit WBT-TV, Charlotte 

89 



TV 




m 



~_ 



^ 



In 1884 Paul Nipkow in- 
vented the television scan- 
ning disc and thus began 
the history of television. 

* 
Blair-Tf Inc. teas the first 
exclusive representative of 
television stations. The first 
company to recognize and 
act on the television sta- 
tions' real need for hard 
hitting, single minded, ex- 
clusive representation. 



INC. 



REPRESENTING 
Birmingham WBRC-TV 

Columbus WBNS-TV 

Lo» Angeles KTSl 

New Orleans WDSU-TV 

Omaha WOW-TV 

Richmond WTVR 

Sail Lake City KDYL-TV 

Seattle KING-TV 



Bruck; Cunningham & Walsh; Biow; 
Foote, Cone & Belding; Campbell- 
Ewald; SSC&B; Compton. 

Spot TV leaders among the top 20 
(according to Rorabaugh) include: 
BBD&O; N. W. Ayer; Biow; McCann- 
Erickson; Young & Rubicam; Ruth- 
raufi & Ryan; Fletcher D. Richards; 
J. I). Tarcher; Foster & Davies; SSC- 
&B; Ted Bates; Geyer, Newell & Gan- 
ger; Leo Burnett; D. P. Brotber; J. 
Walter Thompson; Owen & Chappell. 



TV representatives 



Q. Which firms represent TV sta- 
tions nationally? 

A. ABC Spot Sales, 7 West 66th 
Street, New York (also Chicago, Hol- 
lywood, Detroit, San Francisco). 

Avery-Knodel, 608 5th Avenue, New 
York (also Chicago, San Francisco, 
Los Angeles. Atlanta). 

Barnard & Thompson, 299 Madison 
Avenue, New York. 

Bertha Bannan, Little Building, Bos- 
ton (New England only). 

Blair-TV, 100 Park Avenue, New 
York (also Chicago, Detroit, St. Louis, 
San Francisco, Los Angeles). 

The Boiling Company, 480 Lexing- 
ton Avenue, New York (also Chicago, 
Hollywood, and San Francisco). 

The Branham Company, 230 Park 
Avenue, New York (also Chicago, At- 
lanta, St. Louis, Dallas, Detroit, Char- 
lotte, N. C, San Francisco, Los An- 
geles, Memphis) . 

CBS Radio Sales, 485 Madison Ave- 
nue, New York (also Chicago, Los An- 
geles, San Francisco, Memphis, De- 
troit). 

Donald Cooke Incorporated, 551 5th 
Avenue, New York (also Chicago, Los 
Angeles, Cleveland, Detroit). 

DuMont Television Spot Sales, 515 
Madison Avenue, New York. 

Free & Peters, 444 Madison Avenue, 
New York (also Chicago, Atlanta, De- 
troit, Fort Worth, Hollywood, San 
Francisco ) . 

Harrington. Righter & Parsons, 270 
Park Avenue, New York (also Chi- 
cago). 

Headley-Reed Company, 420 Lex- 
ington Avenue, New York (also Chi- 
cago, Detroit, Atlanta, San Francisco, 
Hollywood). 

H R Representatives Incorporated, 
405 Lexington Avenue, New York (al- 
so Chicago, San Francisco). 

George P. I lollingbery Company, 



500 5lh Avenue, New York (also Chi- 
cago. Atlanta, San Francisco, Los An- 
geles). 

The Katz Agency, 488 Madison Ave- 
nue, New York (also Chicago, Detroit. 
Kansas City, Atlanta, Dallas, San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles). 

Keenan & Eickelberg, 2978 Wil- 
shire Boulevard, Los Angeles (local). 

Kettell-Carter. Park Square Build- 
ing, Boston (WOR-TV, WSYR-TV and 
WOIC-TV in New England only). 

Robert Meeker Associates, 521 5th 
Avenue, New York (also Chicago, San 
Francisco, Los Angeles). 

NBC Spot Sales, 30 Rockefeller Pla- 
za, New York ( also Chicago, Cleve- 
land. Denver, Hollywood, San Fran- 
cisco, Washington). 

John E. Pearson Company, 250 Park 
Avenue, New York (also Chicago, Los 
Angeles, San Francisco). 

Edward Petry and Company, 488 
Madison Avenue, New York (also Chi- 
cago, Detroit, San Francisco, Los An- 
geles, St. Louis, Atlanta, Dallas). 

The Richard Railton Company, 681 
Market Street, San Francisco (local). 

Ra-Tel Representatives, 420 Lexing- 
ton Avenue, New York (also Chicago, 
Dallas, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Oklaho- 
ma City, San Francisco). 

Paul H. Raymer Company, 444 Mad- 
ison Avenue, New York (also Chicago. 
Boston, Detroit, San Francisco, Holly- 
wood) . 

Weed and Company, 350 Madison 
Avenue, New York (also Chicago, De- 
troit, Boston, San Francisco, Holly- 
wood, Atlanta). 

Adam J. Young, Jr., 22 East 40th 
Street, New York (also Chicago, Los 
Angeles, San Francisco). 

Q. What services do TV national 
representatives render? 

A. Point by point here are some of 
the services performed by TV repre- 
sentatives: 

1. Market and station data is issued 
in summary form including popula- 
tion, number of families, number of 
TV sets and buying income. 

2. TV rate cards were originalK 
based on a projected card set up ex- 
perimentally by NBC and DuMont. 
Since that time rate cards have grown 
like Topsy. A standardized rate card 
may soon be available to the industry 
as a result of sessions by agency, ad- 
vertiser, station representatives, and 
NAB executives. 

3. Program and announcement 



SPONSOR 



* • 




^ .'.oST'- 




Television set ownership is growing at a 
phenomenal rate. Every day television is paying 
off more . . . to more advertisers. 

Even the time when networking breaks 
into the black is very near. That's why it is 
extra important now to remember 
certain things about television: — 



• •••*•••••••••••••••* 



In the beginning . . . there was Du Mont. 
Yes, Du Mont did it first — built the first 
network between its New York station 
WABD and its Washington station WTTG. . 
Now the Du Mont Television Network 
contains 54 stations from coast to coast. 

As for coverage, Du Mont gets 'em all— 
99% of the nation's telesets are 
within reach of the Du Mont signal. 
(And don't forget that Du Mont signals 
are just as good as anybody's.) 

With no vested interest in other media, 

Du Mont concentrates — gives 

its undivided attention to televisor. 

Du Mont believes in television — 

with a young-minded singleness of 

purpose that bodes the best for sponsors. 



Du Mont continuous program research pioneers 3 
the way to larger audiences, smaller budgets. J ^ 
Du Mont cuts the- cost of television— P j, 

labors to deliver more 
viewers per dollar. And 
that's only part of 
the reason why — 

•••••••* 




• • 



TWO 

The Nation's Window on the World 

515 Madison Avenue, N. Y. 22, N. Y. 

A Division of Allen B. Du Mont Laboratories, Inc. 
Copyright 1950, Allen B. Du Mont Laboratories, Inc. 



Large advertiser or small, there is Du Mont time 
and talent, Du Mont programs and spots 
suited to you. For the rest of the story — 
write, wire, phone or run over to: 

THE DU MONT TELEVISION NETWORK 



17 JULY 1950 



91 



TV 




RADIO OR TV ACTIVITY? 

Pulse now surveys regu- 
larly the following mar- 
kets: 

RADIO 

Boston 

New York 

Northern New Jersey 

Philadelphia 

Washington, D. C. 

Richmond 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

San Francisco 

Los Angeles 

TV 

Boston 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Washington, D. C. 

Cleveland 

Dayton 

Columbus 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

Los Angeles 

For programs telecast in more 
than three markets, Pulse of- 
fers its Multi Market Tele- 
Pulse. 

The Pulse survey — a reason- 
ably accurate survey — deliv- 
ered in a reasonable amount 
of time after field study — 
does not cost $1,000,000. 

For radio and television facts 
ASK THE PULSE 

THE PULSE Incorporated 

15 WEST 46TH STREET 
NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



availability data is routinely sent to ad- 
vertisers and agencies. Immediate in- 
formation is available when needed. 

4. Programing aid is offered in an 
advisory capacity : TV representatives 
suggest changes in programing and 
point out technical flaws. Some repre- 
sentatives are also beginning to aid in 
the development of national spot pro- 
graming on film. 

5. Station brochures and a compre- 
hensive presentation of stations' sali- 
ent sales points are handled by most 
representatives from copy to art work 
and production. Letters and bulletins 
are also mailed to advertisers and 
agencies. Some highlight success sto- 
ries of programs and personalities, 
show the specific types of programs 
best suited for a sponsor's product. 

6. TV representatives also carry on 
a general orientation to sell TV to ad- 
vertisers. The Katz Agencv. for one, 
prepared a 40-50 page mimeographed 
book, TV Facts for Advertisers, ac- 
quainting agencies and advertisers with 
the general TV background. The Katz 
Agency has also prepared a film show- 
ing commercial techniques for TV an- 
nouncements actually being used on 
video. In addition, representatives like 
Free & Peters hold clinics and group 
meetings for advertisers. F & P "rang 
the bell" with a remarkably successful 
sales clinic for its stations in Chicago 
early in June. Petry has developed a 
system of showing simulated TV on 
film that is used by many agencies and 
advertisers in Chicago and New York. 



TV coverage 



Q. How can an advertiser assess 
the coverage he's getting when he 
buys time on a TV station? 

A. Coverage involves at least three 
important considerations an advertiser 
needs to know : ( 1 1 the extent of the 
area around the transmitter in which 
the signal can be heard adequately, 

(2) the number of sets in that area, 

(3) where they are located in the area. 

Q. What do the stations furnish 
to guide an advertiser? 

A. They have engineering maps which 
show where their signals can be re- 
ceived acceptably. Tests have estab- 
lished that reception is generally ac- 
ceptable when the signal from the 
transmitter comes in with an intensity 



of 0.5 millivolts per meter. I Millivolts 
per meter is usually abbreviated to 
mv/m. I The 0.5 mv/m contour shown 
on most station coverage maps goes 
out on an average of about 40 miles 
from the transmitter. The contour is 
seldom a perfect circle, because shape 
of the terrain and other interferences 
influence the distance the signal will 
travel. 

Experience has shown, however, that 
a 40-mile contour is too conservative 
an estimate, and that generally speak- 
ing 40-50 miles is a fair rule of thumb 
in estimating a coverage area. NBC is 
making maps for some stations in 
which the outer contour is computed 
on the basis of 0.1 mv/m. Tests have 
indicated that acceptable pictures may 
be received in this area which gener- 
ally extends 10 miles or more beyond 
the 0.5 mv/m contour. Maps with the 
0.1 mv/m contours will not be drawn 
for stations whose areas have a con- 
siderable overlap with neighboring 
service areas. In these cases, maps will 
show only the 5 and the 0.5 mv/m 
contours. 

Mail maps are another indication of 
the extent of coverage, but have to be 
considered in the light of the severe 
limitations inherent in this type of sur- 
vey. Mail does reveal that programs 
are frequently received up to 100 miles 
from the transmitter. Good reception 
beyond 50 miles is not at all uncom- 
mon. 

Reception within a station's service 
area may have blind spots because of 
the shape of the terrain or other in- 
terference. Returns from direct sell- 
ing pitches, contests, premiums, and 
other offers throw light on the loca- 
tion of such "pockets" in its coverage. 
As with other types of mail response, 
don't draw conclusions too fast. These 
can be quite misleading unless one is 
aware of the pitfalls in interpreting 
mail maps. 

Q. How are the number of sets in 
an area determined? 

A. They are calculated from reports 
of distributors and dealers in the area. 
Estimates are made either by the sta- 
tion management, or a committee rep- 
resenting several stations in an area, 
or for them by an electrical power com- 
pany or association. 

There is as yet no way to furnish a 
breakdown on the location of sets with- 
in a specific service area. The RTMA 
has made a start toward making this 



92 



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Telecasting directly from an 
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possible by compiling county break- 
downs of sets shipped by its members. 
Useful as this is, there are still severe 
limitations to this program. First, the 
RTMA does not cover all counties in 
TV markets, nor is it possible to get 
all its members to cooperate in break- 
ing down their shipments. This is be- 
cause the job requires extra labor 
which some smaller members feel they 
can't afford. Eighty-five percent is 
about the maximum expected to coop- 
erate in this project. 

Second, some 20-25' < of set produc- 
tion is accounted for by non-members 
of the RTMA. They are especially ac- 
tive in certain sections of the country, 
and this will tend to distort the picture. 
A key to the current controversy be- 
tween audience researcher Hooper and 
NBC research head M. H. Beville is 
inability to determine where sets go 
once shipped into an area. The 
first possible basis for making a rea- 
sonable estimate on this score will be 
publication of census data which will 
give a check on quantity and distribu- 
tion of sets. With this knowledge, re- 
searchers can apportion set distribu- 
tion within an area on a statistical ba- 
sis. It will still be only a "best guess." 
but up to now even that hasn't been 
possible. 

Q. Should an advertiser eliminate 
his advertising on a radio station 
50 miles away from the TV station 
carrying his message? 

A. There s no pat answer to this one. 
The problem isn't the same for net- 
work and spot advertisers. For exam- 
ple, a network advertiser might think 
seriously before sacrficing enough sta- 
tions to lose full network discounts. A 
spot advertiser will have many addi- 
tional problems to complicate sched 
uling adequate coverage around TV 
stations carrying his message. Is the 
TV penetration strong enough and the 
impact hard enough to justify sacrific- 
ing "outside" coverage? The answer 
can't be the same for all sponsors. The 
pattern of distribution, location of best 
customers, size of ad budget, and other 
factors bear on the question. 



TV unions 



Q. Does the current union situa- 
tion threaten to have an effect on 
rates this fall? 



A. It does. There has never been a 
TV contract covering talent unions. 
For the stars the problem is slight: 
they are well paid, considering the 
present growth of the medium. But 
the rank and file, particularly dramatic 
talent, are fighting for minimum rates, 
rehearsal pay, better working condi- 
tions. These are the bedrock demands. 
There are other issues, such as a share 
in re-used shows, and off-the-tube TV 
transcriptions. 

There's no question but that tal?nt 
will win a satisfactory adjustment on 
most of their demands and this can 
mean only one thing: increased pack- 
age costs. All is not quiet on the tech- 
nical union front. There are upward 
salary adjustments to be expected. 
The networks will certainly continue 
to cut operating costs as they grow 
more skilled at the job, and thus ab- 
sorb part of the increased costs. But 
it would be foolish to ignore the in- 
evitable. The sponsor will have to 
pay for part of these added costs in 
higher rates. How much it will be is 
nobody's guess right now — there's just 
no basis for guessing. 

The reason there's been no talent 
contract is a complicated story of juris- 
dictional disputes between East and 
West Coast unions, which has been de- 
scribed fully in Ross Reports on tele- 
vision programing. Jurisdictional prob- 
lems are also responsible for lack of a 
contract with television writers. Their 
cause is not being pushed vigorously, 
and even a settlement is not expected 
to greatly affect production budgets. 
Talent is the big item. 

Q. What is the current Petrillo 
situation as it affects (1) network, 
(2) spot, (3) films? 

A. Musicians are now working at 
about 80% of radio rates, and there's 
not too much pressure for upping rates. 
Live shows are not affected by the cur- 
rent ban on music for TV films and 
transcriptions. Music in the public do- 
main, foreign sound tracks, and films 
whose sound tracks were produced be- 
fore the ban have been substituted for 
new music. A few independents have 
been permitted to score films ( Autrv 
shows for example ) , and there's some 
wildcatting, but not much. 

Since the greater part of TV spot in- 
volves film, it is obvious that there will 
be a production boom in spot when 
the music issue is settled. The indus- 



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MANAGEMENT: "One of most successful oper- 
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DAVENPORT, IOWA 

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Exclusive National Representatives 




try keeps getting optimistic reports of 
a settlement in the making, and now 
there's every evidence it isn't far off. 



TV research 



Q. What's available in TV re- 
search? 

A. Generally speaking, the same kind 
of research is available for TV as for 
radio. The leading organizations who 
were engaged in radio research have 
expanded their services to include TV. 
In addition, numerous small new or- 
ganizations have gone into the busi- 
ness, usually the program rating side 
of it. The fields covered are: I 1 1 pro- 
gram research, designed to tell how 
many viewers a program has; who 
they are, when, where, how often and 
how long they view. The "qualitative" 
side of program research investigates 
the likes and dislikes of program ele- 
ments, may offer diagnoses for correc- 
tive treatment: (2) audience research, 
which counts number of listeners to 
networks and individual stations. 

Q. Where can audience and pro- 
gram information be obtained? 

A. Various research organizations fur- 
nish a variety of such information. 
They obtain the data in several differ- 
ent ways, and the manner in which it 
is obtained affects the way in which it 
is interpreted and used. Agency ex- 
perts should be consulted on this prob- 
lem. 

The A. C. Nielsen Co. obtains data 
from automatic meters (Audimeters) 
attached to the set: provides the only 
TV network ratings. C. E. Hooper, 
Inc. obtains data from telephone calls; 
provides ratings for 13 TV markets on 
a monthly basis. Rating organiza- 
tions active in a limited number of 
markets are American Research Bu- 
reau. Washington I diary studies) ; Ad- 
vertest Research, New Brunswick, N. 
J. (personal interviews); Robert S. 
Conlan. Kansas City, Mo. I telephone 
interviews I : Jay & Graham Research. 
Chicago (diary studies: monthly quan- 
titative and qualitive reports for 19 
markets) ; Market Research of Cleve- 
land (surveys tailored to order); The 
Pulse. New York I personal inter- 
views!: Albert E. Sindlinger & Co., 
Philadelphia I obtains Philadelphia 
data only through electronic device). 



96 



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THE A. S. ABELL COMPANY Z=r 




BALTIMORE 3, MARYLAND 



WRIETY 

PLAQUE AWARD 
FOR 1949-1950 

"Responsibility to the Community" 

WMAR-TV BALTIMORE 



Sunpapers TV station shone brightly this 
year in the nation's shiniest TV town. In 
video-happy Baltimore, WMAR-TV won the 
distinction of becoming the first sight sta- 
tion in nation to outrank all AM stations 
in its market in average evening audience. 
In the process of rolling up ratings, 
WMAR-TV did not overlook public service 
and came up with two important PS 
series in "Atomic Report" and "Slums." 

Former show brought in front of the 
cameras some of the nation's top atomic 
authorities to explain to the average 
viewer the atomic facts of life. That was 
WMAR tackling a world problem. On the 
local front, the station resourcefully drew 



upon facilities and talents of its own 
newsreel unit for "Slums," a documentary 
about Baltimroe's No. I local problem. 
Hard-hitting documentary had several per- 
formances on station, and then was given 
additional circulation by showings at vari- 
ous organizations and civic groups around 
city. Out of this TV documentary came 
"The Baltimo r e Plan" for slum clearance, 
which has attracted national attention. As 
WMAR sums it up, the "Slums" picture 
was the ". . . vanguard of a reform which 
began with the city examining its con- 
science and then going to work to destroy 
the blight of slums. . . ." 

•Voriofy. Wednesdoy, May 24, 1950 



l + t*> * it* Hi t 



PUBLIC INURES! 



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IN MARYLAND MOST PEOPLE WATCH 

WMAR-TV 

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TELEVISION AFFILIATE OF THE COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



TV 



Q. What - principal types of serv- 
ice are offered? 

A. Following is a brief summary of 
the kinds of information furnished : 

Sets in use, the percentage of the 
sample actually listening at any period. 
Records of the trend at various times 
throughout day. week, or month, are 
useful in choosing programs and time 
of broadcast. 

Share of audience, the percentage of 
sets in use tuned to a given program 
(or station I. It i> one measure of the 
relative pulling power of a show. 

Audience composition, the percent- 



age of men. women, and children 
tuned to a program; helps a sponsor 
judge the appropriateness of his pro- 
gram and time period. 

Behavior of the broadcast audience 
from period to period ( minute to min- 
ute as measured by meter and diary 
reports I is analyzed and reported as 
part of the regular service of firms like 
Nielsen and Jay & Graham. Such 
analyses may include information on 
home characteristics, audience turn- 
over, frequency of listening, audience 
for spot announcements. 

Sales effectiveness studies are not 



*Ts** 



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the Only 

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in 
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Heodley-Reed, National Representatives 




available as a regular service from 
most program-rating organizations. 
They are available from the Nielsen 
Company as part of a comprehensive 
service called the National NRI (Niel- 
sen Radio Index) Service. C. E. Hoop- 
er. Inc.. offers a service called Sales 
Impact ratings. 

Hooper also furnishes reports com- 
paring radio and television listening 
and viewing in AM-TV markets. 

Q. Are there any organizations 
specializing in how to improve pro- 
grams? 

A. Some agencies, such as BBD&O. 
McCann-Erickson. Young & Rubicam. 
and Ruthrauff & Ryan, have special 
units in their research departments de- 
voted specifically to learning the effec- 
tive reasons of listeners for liking or 
disliking a program as it unfolds min- 
ute by minute. Erom this information, 
recommendations for correction or 
strengthening can be made. CBS has 
available the Lazarsfeld-Stanton Pro- 
gram Analvser. an electronic device for 
obtaining listener likes and dislikes to 
programs. The only independent re- 
search organization specializing in this 
type of research is the Schwerin Re- 
search Corp.. New York, which has 
probably done more than anyone else 
to date in this field. This type of re- 
search was one of the last to be applied 
to radio programs, mainly because it 
was resisted by program people who 
refused to admit their creative intui- 
tions could be as mistaken as "program 
analyser" technique sometimes proved 
they were. There's been little of this 
kind of research on TV programs thus 
far, because program competition 
hasn't been tough enough. Miles Lab- 
oratories is a notable exception, hav- 
ing subjected their TV Quiz Kids to 
numerous Schwerin tests. 



Q. How valid is TV research? 

A. This is a question being asked 
everywhere, but put in that way the 
question hasn't any real meaning. 

If applied to ratings and number of 
viewers per program, or to the circula- 
tion of a station, the question is really 
asking whether information about the 
number and location of sets in TV 
markets is accurate enough to be use- 
ful. A summary of the problem of 
counting and locating TV sets is pre- 
sented on page 92 under a question on 
TV coverage. The truth is that nobod\ 



98 



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99 



TV 






knows how accurate the estimates are. 

If the question applies to the meth- 
ods of sampling and computing the re- 
sults, research organizations will tell 
you their methods yield results as ac- 
curate as clients require and are will- 
ing to pay for. This isn't true in all 
cases, but in general, results, even with 
current limitations, are good enough 
to be useful. 

Different means of gathering listen- 
ing data I telephone, diary, meter I af- 
fect the kinds of answers you can get. 
Whether or not one method is more 
"valid"" than another depends on what 
you want to do with the information 
obtained. A failure to understand this 
is the source of many a pointless argu- 
ment about the superiority of one sys- 
tem of gathering listening information 
over another. 

Any of the systems in use today can 
produce sufficiently accurate results, 
within the limits of what they are de- 
signed to accomplish, to be useful. The 
important questions should concern 
just what kinds of data the client real- 
ly needs. Research counsellors can 
then advise him what method to em- 
ploy in obtaining the answers. 



TV programing 




Q. Is it essential that an adver- 
tiser choose his program from 
among the most popular types? 

A. Not necessarily. Drama and com- 
edy-variety, for example, are normally 
nighttime attractions, while some prod- 
ucts are best sold by daytime pro- 
grams. Some program types appeal to 
an advertiser's best prospects; they 
may not respond to other types. Better 
check into affinity of program and 
product, time of broadcast, program 
competition, and various other such 
factors. 



Q. Will there be more daytime 
programing this fall? 

A. All four TV networks will have 
daytime schedules this fall (see back 
of television map on page 33 1 . 
There'll be no great problem in ob- 
taining the necessary network in most 
instances — stations not already on the 
air can be expected to warm up their 
transmitters for any show that's sold. 

Q. What's the daytime program 
trend? 

A. As it looks now. daytime TV pro- 
graming will probablv evolve some- 
what along the lines that radio took, 
concentrating on women's service type 
shows at first. Service shows build 
small, loyal audiences, are extremely 
valuable salesmen. But it takes enter- 
tainment programs to build big circu- 
lation. TV won't take the time radio 
did to develop daytime entertainment, 
but advertisers are as wary now of 
buying afternoon TV as thev were of 
nighttime two years ago. Numbers of 



c tations in various markets have out- 
standing success stories, however, and 
once the stampede starts there'll be 
plenty of sponsors who'll lament wait- 
ing so late to make up their minds and 
missing out on key time slots. 

There will certainly be more kid 
shows on the air. They've proved them- 
selves. But as for other types than 
women's service programs, only exper- 
imentation will determine the trend. 
Both sports and audience participation 
shows will get time on the air because 
they are relatively inexpensive. 



Q. What is being done about news 
programing? 

A. Not much, so far. if you compare 
what is being done with radio's 
achievements in this field. TV hasn't 
yet found way? to apply its special ad- 
vantages to producing many outstand- 
ing news shows. Sponsors are hard to 
find, and many stations report they 
lose money I because of high produc- 
tion costs I even on sponsored news. 
INS has done good work helping spon 
sors with news formats. Some individ- 
ual stations like WBAL-TV. are show- 
ing ingenuity in attacking the problem 
of creating viewable news programs. 

Q. What are prospects for better 
news programs? 

A. The "feature page" approach to 
news has possibilities on TV altogether 
bevond radio: this angle is getting con- 
centrated attention from network pro- 
gram chiefs. Special treatments of 
news peculiar to TV will be developed; 
but just how soon we'll see major 
progress is impossible to tell. Next 
fall should see some interesting experi- 
ments alone these lines. 



Ratings of TV network proyram types* 


Type of Program 


No. on 


Average for 

All 


Highest Rated 
Prog. 


Lowest Rated 
Prog. 


Children's 


6 


25.9 


35.9 


16.5 


Drama 


21 


35.4 


44.8 


16.5 


Musical 


3 


18.2 


24.9 


9.9 


Quiz and Audience 
Participation 


9 


25.9 


50.0 


5.8 


Sports 


5 


22.6 


45.1 


12.7 


Variety-Comedy 


23 


34.0 


77.7 


15.3 


'Nielsen ratings for March-April-May. 



100 



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They climbed the 

world's ta I lest tower 

so you could 

see farther 



Installation of 

NBC's television antennas has been a job 

for daring steeplejacks! 

No. 6 in a series outlining high 
points in television history 

Photos from the historical collection of RCA 

• Dwarfed ant-small by their height above Manhattan's 
streets, skilled and daring workmen — in 1931— offered New 
Yorkers a sight as exciting as the highwire act at a circus . . . 
but much more significant. 

Task of these men, as they clambered about atop the tower 
of the Empire State Building— 1250 feet in the air— was to 
install an antenna for experimental telecasts from NBC's tele- 
vision station. "Why did it have to be so high?" was a question 
on thousands of watchers' lips. 





Steeplejacks at work on an NBC television antenna — 1250 feet 
above the sidewalks of New York. Its height gives telecasts a wider 
range in the New York and New Jersey area. 



As might have been expected, with television an unfamiliar 
art, the average layman thought of it in relation to radio 
broadcasts, whose waves he knew could circle the globe. That 
telecasts were fundamentally limited by the line of the horizon 
was little known. To increase this limiting range, scientists, 
engineers, and technicians, sought the highest available van- 
tage point. 

With its antenna installed, this experimental television sta- 
tion was able to transmit pictures a distance of about 42 miles, 
and farther under highly favorable conditions. Beceivers 
dotted around the New York area picked up the first tele- 
casts, providing encouraging and instructive information to be 
studied bv BCA's scientists. 



A familiar sight on the Netv York ski/line, NBC's television antenna 
— installed in 1946- was the successor to those erected in 1931, 
1936 and 193H, and used by RCA and NBC to perfect television. 



102 



Facts gathered in this period included new data on the be- 
havior of very short waves, as well as how to handle them. 
New knowledge about interference was acquired, including 
the fact that much of it was man-made and therefore could be 
eliminated. 

Other studies undertaken at the time included basic work 
on the "definition" most suitable for regular commercial tele- 
casts. Definition as coarse as 60-lines was used in early days. 
Then came 341-line, and 441, until today's standard of 525- 
line definition was finally adopted. 

That we may now, as a matter of course, see sharp, clear 
pictures on the screens of our home television receivers is in 
good part the result of experimental work initiated by BCA 
scientists, and carried out by NBC engineers since the erection 
of the first station in the Empire State Building. A share 
should also be credited to the steeplejacks who climbed to 
dizzy heights so that you could see farther! 

j^^i) Radio Corporation of America 

WORLD LEADER IN RADIO — FIRST IN TELEVISION 

SPONSOR 



TV 



Q. What types of TV programs do 
audiences like best? 

A. As might be expected, radio's best- 
liked types, drama and variety-comedy, 
are also favored on TV. The table 
shown on page 100 is based on Neilsen 
figures for March-April-May. 1950. 
But all six categories listed in the 
sponsor chart showed creditably. 

Q. What about kid shows that 
draw a substantial audience of 
grownups? 

A. This has been a problem with some 
shows. Who is the sponsor trying to 
sell — the youngsters, or their parents? 
There is a definite need to see that a 
show aimed at snaring the interest of 
the youngsters doesn't lose out by em- 
phasizing elements appealing to adults 
while boring their offspring. Audience 
reaction tests may help solve this prob- 
lem. Much less attention has been giv- 
en, so far, to qualitative testing of TV 
programs than to radio programs. This 
will change as sponsors wake to fact 
that the mere addition of sight to 
sound doesn't wipe out audience likes 
and dislikes for certain program ele- 
ments. 

Q. What is the status of audience 
reaction tests for TV shows? 

A. CBS. with its Lazarsfeld-Stanton 
Program Analyser, and several of the 
larger agencies, such as BBD&O, 
Young & Rubicam. Ruthrauff & Ryan, 
and McCann-Erickson. have audience 
reaction study units. Researchers don't 
yet know nearly so much about apply- 
ing these qualitative techniques to TV 
as they do to radio. Schwerin Research 
Corp. has probably done more than 
anyone else so far in developing appli- 
cation of the techniques to TV. 

Q. What is the trend in kid 
shows? 

A. There'll be more of them on the 
air this fall than ever before. 



Feature films on TV 



Q. What are the advantages of 
sponsoring feature films on TV? 

A. During 1949. films bearing the la- 
bel "Made in Hollywood"' boasted an 
average Telepulse rating of 17.8. Phil- 
adelphia's WPTZ has what is probably 



the highest-rated local TV program. 
Frontier Playhouse. This regular cow- 
boy film feature is up to a 27.5 Niel- 
sen rating. 

By devising participation plans, 
many stations arc able to draw in local 
advertisers who lack the huge budget 
of a national sponsor. For as little as 
$100 I WPTZ's Hollywood Playhouse I 
and as much as 855.") i \ight Owl The- 
atre on WPIX, New York I a sponsor 
can capitalize on Hollywood magic. 

These are the reasons TV viewers 
go for films so avidly, regardless of 
their age: 

1. Movies are something you usual- 
l\ have to pay for. 

2. Action usually takes viewers out- 
of-doors to a variety of places, doesn't 
give them studio claustrophobia. 

3. Even cheaper Hollywood pictures 
have a smoothness and precision un- 
duplicated in all but the highest-priced 
live TV shows. Flubs are non-existent 
on film. 

If the accountant's approach is the 
most impressive, remember that any 
Hollywood picture originally cost from 
$100,000 to $1,000,000. This value re- 
mains as long as the film itself lasts. 

Q. What does it cost to have a 
one-minute TV commercial made 
on film? 

A. It all depends. You can get a job 
done inexpensively by one of the small- 
er TV film companies in New York or 



Hollywood. But national advertisers 
regularly spend from $1,000 to 83,000 
for a good one-minute commercial 
from Hal Roach. Apc\ Film Co., and 
other top TV film firms. 

Special effect commercials cost more. 
Stop-motion costs from $5,000 t<> 
$7,500. Partial animation costs from 
$2,500 to $3,500 and the tab for full 
animation runs from $3,500 to 87.000. 

Here are some of the variables that 
affect TV film commercial costs : 

1. Quantity of commercials made 
at one time. The more made at 
once, the cheaper they can be 
made. 

2. Complexity of the set used. 

3. The number and calibre of ac- 
tors. 

4. Amount of rehearsal time. 

5. Type of sound recording; voice 
over or direct lip synchronism. 

6. Filming on location or on a 
sound stage. 



TV sports 



Q. Will more or less sports events 
be available next fall for TV cov- 
erage? 

A. In general, there will be as much 
sporting coverage as last year, prob- 
ably more in some fields — golf, for ex- 
ample. 



Where to get whieh feature films 



Associated Artists Productions, 
444 Madison Avenue, NYC 

Feature lengths 270 

Western features 98 

Shorts 42 

Official Television, Inc., 
25 West 45 St., NYC 

Feature lengths 13 

Shorts _ .. 137 
Cartoons 47 

Flamingo Films, Inc., 
538 Fifth Avenue, NYC 

Feature lengths 12 

Western features 2 

Serials 10 

Shorts 188 

Cartoons 35 

Film Equities Corp., 
1600 Broadway, NYC 



Masterpiece Productions, 
45 West 45 St., NYC 

Feature lengths . 25 

Nationwide Television Pictures, 
1600 Broadway, NYC 

Feature lengths 40 

Shorts 252 

Commonwealth Film & Television, 
Inc., 723 Seventh Avenue, NYC 



Feature lengths 
Western features 

Serials 

Shorts 

Cartoons 



92 

33 

3 

65 

265 



Feature lengths 
Western Features 



68 
30 

Serials - 22 

Shorts 225 

Cartoons _ 125 



Standard Television Corp., 
1600 Broadway, NYC 

Feature lengths 75 

Ziv Television Programs, Inc., 
488 Madison Ave., NYC 



Feature lengths 
Western features 
Shorts 
Cartoons 



75 

40 

317 

39 



17 JULY 1950 



103 



TV 






Fight promoters are still righting for 
a 50'/« cut of Madison Square Garden 
TV receipts. And the Pacific Coast 
Conference is expected to follow the 
Big 10 in their han on live telecasts 
of Western football games. Eastern 
colleges and Eastern pro-football teams 
are acting differently. At least four 
large Eastern institutions have signed 
for next fall: Army, Navy. Columbia. 
Notre Dame. Others are expected to 
follow suit. 

Research so far indicates strongly 
that TV set owners are loyal in-person 
fans. too. New set owners cut down 
their in-person visits to games, but step 
them up when the novelty wears off. 
So far this research is rather spotty, 
and while networks and independents 
are convinced TV is an assist to the 
gate, CBS sportscaster John Derr is 
cautious about generalizing. 

There is no doubt that "sports " like 
wrestling and the Roller Derby owe 
their life's blood to television. Racing 
promoters, especially the trotting races, 
are tickled by the increased attendance 
TV has brought. 

It may take several more vears to 
convince promoters that TV helps rath- 
er than hinders attendance, but experi- 



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These proven programs 
may still be available in yours. 



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enced sports experts point out that the 
same problem cropped up in radio's 
early days. It's just a matter of time. 
At any rate, the subject is good for a 
stiff argument among practically any 
group of sports promoters. 

Q. Are there any trends in TV cov- 
erage of sports? 

A. Network coverage of sports is 
gradually falling off as time becomes 
more valuable. Unless a sporting event 
has national interest, like the World 
Series or a championship boxing bout, 
it won't prove interesting to all the 
viewers on a network. And network 
sponsors want New York outlets for 
their expensive evening variety and 
comedy shows. 

Independent stations, on the other 
hand, are strong on sports. WPIX is 
New York City s leading sports TV 
station, with WOR-TV close on its 
heels. 



Q. What are the sports coverage 
plans of network and leading New 
York independent stations for next 
fall? 

A. DuMont plucked one of the ripest 
college football plums for next fall: 
all Notre Dame home games, to be 
sponsored by the Chevrolet Dealers. 
Wrestling on Monday night and box- 
ing Thursday night will continue, as 
will Trotting Races from Yonkers. Du- 
Mont is still negotiating, with the pos- 
sibility of taking Saturday night Mad- 
ison Square Garden events. 

ABC has Sun Oil Co. signed up for 
pro-football games. Only catch to this 
is the proviso that such games cant 
be telecast closer than 75 miles from 
where they take place. Boxing will be 
televised Tuesday night and wrestling 
Wednesday night, on a cooperative ba- 
sis. The Roller Derby will be featured 
on Thursday nights from 10:00 p.m. 
to about 11:00 p.m.; Friday nights 
from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.; Saturday 
nights from 10:00 p.m. to conclusion 
at about 11:00 p.m. Blatz beer is ex- 
pected back in the fall. Chevrolet is 
not. The gold championship is sched- 
uled for coverage in August. College 
football is still under negotiation and 
nothing is yet planned by ABC for 
basketball coverage. 

CBS has already signed for TV 
rights to all home football games of 
Army, Navy, and Columbia. Esso 
Standard Oil Co. will be the sponsor. 



This network has also contracted for 
Madison Square Garden events on Sat- 
urday nights. These events would in- 
clude the Rodeo, track meets, and bas- 
ketball. 

CBS is feeling the time squeeze bad- 
ly, may film the more appealing sports 
events, then present a digest later on. 

NBC is pushing its horse racing 
schedule. Lately it has branched out 
to cover Chicago racing, with Pabst 
Blue Ribbon Beer as sponsor. Gillette 
Razor Co. continues its Cavalcade of 
Sports on Friday night, but often uses 
sport films to fill in when there is a 
dearth of good boxing bouts. They hit 
hard on special top-notch events. NBC 
is cool to wrestling. Roller Derby, and 
basketball. Golf, on the other hand, is 
getting increasing attention. The Palm 
Beach Round Robin golf tournament 
in New Rochelle this June set a prece- 
dent — the Wykagyl Golf Club rear- 
ranged its course to make televising 
easier. Forest Hills tennis tournaments 
are a regular feature and the college 
regatta at Marietta, Ohio, was covered 
this June. Along with the other net- 
works, NBC wouldn't mind televising 
the World Series baseball games. 

As an indication of what's being 
done by individual stations throughout 
the nation, here's the lineup on two 
New York stations: 

WPIX is New York's top sports TV 
station. At a cost of $200,000. the sta- 
tion will pick up Madison Square Gar- 
den events five nights a week, from 
8:30 p.m. to about 11:00. Chevrolet 
Dealers already are signed up for one- 
half of this package, with Webster Cig- 
ars taking another one-fourth. One- 
fourth is open at this writing, but will 
undoubtedly be gone when fall rolls 
around. The weekend is also covered 
by WPIX, with boxing on Saturday 
night. Rover hockey matches Sunday 
afternoon, and Ranger hockey games 
Sunday night. Negotiations are still on 
for Saturday afternoon televising of a 
major Eastern college football sched- 
ule. Sandwiched in between these reg- 
ular events will be such things as the 
Golden Gloves ( Chevrolet Dealers I and 
the Silver Skates. 

WOR-TV is strong on wrestling and 
boxing, expects to repeat its twice- 
weekly schedules for these two sports. 
With six nights open next fall. WOR- 
TV will expand its sports coverage. 
Complete plans are not yet made. 



104 



SPONSOR 





Service to the itvimdvusiet 



Service is one of the basic theme songs of BMI. The 
nation's broadcasters are using all of the BMI aids to 
programming ... its vast and varied repertoire ... its 
useful and saleable program continuities ... its re- 
search facilities . . . and all of the elements which are 
within the scope of music in broadcasting. 

The station manager, program director, musical di- 
rector, disc jockey and librarian takes daily advantage 
of the numerous time-saving and research-saving func- 
tions provided by BMI. 

Along with service to the broadcaster — AM, FM, and 
TV — BMI is constantly gaining new outlets, building 
new repertoires of music, and constantly expanding 
its activities. 

The BMI broadcast licensee can be depended upon 
to meet every music requirement. 



Now in its tenth year, BMI has achieved a notable distinction 
as an organization dedicated to the world of music. 

BMI-licensed music has been broadcast by every performing 
artist, big name and small name, on every program, both com- 
mercial and sustaining, over every network and every local 
station in the United States and Canada. 

Every concert artist, vocalist and instrumentalist, and every 
symphony orchestra in the world has performed BMI-licensed 
music. 



BROADCAST MUSIC, Inc. 

580 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD • TORONTO • MONTREAL 



17 JULY 1950 



105 



TV 



TV transcriptions 



Q. What are the advantages of 
off - the - tube filmings of TV 
shows? 

A. Off - the - tube film recordings, 
dubbed "Teletranscriptions" 1>\ Du- 
Mont, "Vitapix" by ABC. and "Kine- 
scope Recordings" by NBC. are the 
most inexpensive current means of ex- 
tending a network show into markets 
not connected by coaxial cable or mi- 
cro-wave relay. Recordings often en- 
able the sponsor to schedule the de- 
layed broadcast at a better hour than 
origiaallv aired. A non-connected mar- 
ket like Los Angeles, for example, may 
be more important to an advertiser 
than certain interconnected markets. 
As stations ( particularly smaller sta- 
tions I add a.m. schedules, recorded 
shows will form a share of the pro- 
gramming, being cheaper than films. 

Q. Will there be much use for re- 
corded shows when the East Coast- 
West Coast cable link is com- 
pleted? 

A. Yes. In the Southwest and North- 
west particularly, where there may be 
onl) two TV stations within 100-300 
miles, it long will be too expensive to 
install feed lines to reach such stations. 



Q. Will TV recordings continue to 
be used in interconnected cities? 

A. Yes. because not all stations can 
clear time for every network show. 
Then a delayed broadcast via record- 
ing is the answer. 



Q. What are chief limitations to 
use of TV recordings? 

A. Where timeliness is an important 
element of the script a delayed broad- 
cast may lose much of its punch, at 
worst become completely unusable. For 
example, recorded newscasts are out. 
Participation programs involving tele- 
phone calls are also out. since the orig- 
inal calls are part of the film. 

Q. What about quality? 

A. Network engineering departments 
have made great advances during the 
lasl sear in perfecting equipment and 
techniques to improve the quality oi 
TV recordings. 1 hey give better pic- 
ture <pialil\ now than many old movie 
films. While the) can never be as 'j.<>'t<\ 



as live reproductions, they are now ac- 
ceptable to most top talent. 

Q. How expensive is use of TV re- 
cordings? 

A. Under certain conditions, varying 
somewhat with each network, it costs 
nothing. If a sponsor is willing to "bi- 
cycle"' the prints I use a staggered 
broadcast schedule so that a few prints 
can serve several stations I he mav pa) 
nothing extra for them. He can't buy 
just any number of stations and then 
take advantage of "bicycling"' — the 
number of interconnected and non-con- 
nected stations must be acceptable to 
the network. At DuMont. it's three 
non-connected stations, for which the 
sponsor gets one free print, two prints 
for six stations, and so on. 

ABC, CBS. and NBC have similar 
policies on "bicycled" prints. All net- 
works charge for prints if a sponsor 
wants the show to run simultaneously 
on all interconnected stations ( or un- 
under any condition which doesn't per- 
mit bicycling). Costs for first print 
( l / 2 hour I run like this: CBS, $110.00: 
DuMont, $37.50: NBC. $180.00; ABC 
$225.00. Succeeding prints are less ex- 
pensive. 



Simulcasts 



Q. What factors should an adver- 
tiser consider before simulcasting 
a program? 

A. First of all. does the show lend it- 
self to simulcasting aurally and visual- 
ly? It may be a wonderful show for 
radio or TV but not for both. What 
are the advertiser's sales and distribu- 
tion problems? His product may re- 
quire network TV and spot radio or 
network radio and spot TV: simulcast- 
ing, therefore, may not be the answer 
to bis advertising problems because it's 
not flexible enough. 

The added cost of a simulcasting 
may be too great, considering the job 
it does ad-wise. At present, according 
to Merritt Coleman. CBS assistant to 
the director of business affairs, simul- 
casting means an approximate 25-30' , 
increase in talent costs and almost dou- 
ble the time costs on a station-to-sta- 
tion basis. 



Q. What new problems are there 
in simulcasts? 



A. Current and past simulcasts give 
some indication of the problems faced. 
When NBC's Voice of Firestone was 
first simulcast, viewers saw nothing but 
the orchestra going through their musi- 
cal paces. Now, the visual portion of 
the program has been brought up to a 
par with the sound side of the pro- 
graming by the use of a rear projec- 
tion screen for scenic background ef- 
fects. This, along with a variety of TV 
and Hollywood-type techniques, make 
the Firestone musical presentation 
more interesting visually. 

An advertiser must remember that 
changes like these have to be made 
when his radio show becomes a simul- 
cast. Robert Tormey, ABC staff direc- 
tor, says people on the show must be 
careful not to favor one medium to the 
detriment of the other. For example, 
on some roundtable discussions being 
simulcast, the visual portion of the pro- 
gram may be exciting because of the 
antics of the guests while, at the same 
time, the radio listeners may be suffer- 
ing through a boring commentary. The 
answer to good simulcasting, says Mr. 
Tormey. is not to think in terms of 
good radio or good TV but to compro- 
mise and bring out the fine points of 
both mediums. 

One network executive noted that a 
simulcast can only be effective when 
elaborate settings and costumes are not 
necessary, an added expense that would 
be wasted on the AM audience. And. 
if the show is entertaining and strong 
enough on its own merits, costumes 
and settings are not necessary video- 
wise. The Arthur Godfrey Talent 
Scouts show is a program with simul- 
cast appeal. 

Q. When is a simulcast most ad- 
visable? 

A. If an advertiser wants to push his 
product in major markets and. at the 
same time, get the larger radio cover- 
age his product needs he should simul- 
cast. A network supervisor ventures 
that opinion, and adds: "The adver- 
tiser can, via simulcast, enter into vid- 
eo at a fairly reasonable cost and at 
the same time maintain his radio cov- 
erage. He is combining the powerful 
visual impression of TV with radios 
enormous coverage." 

John Derr, CBS associate director of 
the sports division. sa\s the important 
thing i> the show. It is the event or 
program which should decide whether 
a simulcast is advisable. 



106 



SPONSOR 




Radio fills the gaps 



Radio and TV trends 
in same area 



Q. Is there any partem to the way 
large firms are fitting TV into their 
advertising spectrum? Is it replac- 
ing other media? Is it the basic 
medium in some cases? Can defi- 
nite conclusions be drawn at this 
time? 

A. Definite conclusions cannot be 
drawn at this time. But it is still pos- 
sible to see three things happening as 
advertisers face up to the problem of 
integrating TV into their advertising. 
( 1 ) There's a growing feeling in some 
organizations that one or more media 
should be eliminated to provide a bud- 
get for TV. (2) Others, not yet sure 
how they want to use TV, are setting 
aside budgets for experimenting with 
it. (3) A third approach is to squeeze 
all other media employed to provide 
a budget for TV. 

There are alreadv some cases in 



which TV is being used as the basic 
medium, for example, by Chevrolet 
dealers and by Congoleum-Nairn. It 
is replacing other media in some cases. 
Recently a well-known rug company 
drastically slashed its magazine budget 
and added the money to its TV appro- 
priation. But not until the end of the 
FCC "freeze," when more stations and 
more viewers give television a truly na- 
tional complexion, will long-range 
trends in TV's effect on other media 
become clearer. 



Q. Should the sponsor regard TV 
as a separate medium from radio? 

A. The close correlation possible be- 
tween use of radio and television; the 
fact that both are broadcast media: 
radio and TV station ownership ties 
have kept some sponsors from regard- 
ing the two as distinct forms of adver- 
tising. This must be realized, however, 
if television is to take its proper place 
in the advertising spectrum. Under 
certain conditions some sponsors, P&G 



among them, regard only radio homes 
without TV as their potential radio 
audience, discounting altogether any 
radio listening in television homes. 
This is an experimental practice, not 
blanket policy. The situation is chang- 
ing too fast to make hard and fast 
rules. 



Marginal time 



Q. Is use of marginal time increas- 
ing? (Before 7:00 a.m. and after 
11:00 p.m.) 

A. Spot radio is showing an increase 
in the advertisers' use of marginal 
time. Tom Flanagan. Managing Di- 
rector of the National Association of 
Radio Station Representatives, believes 
there will be a definite increase in the 
6-8 a.m. period. He credits the farmer 
market particularly. What is needed, 
says Mr. Flanagan, is more research 
on the so-called marginal periods. 



17 JULY 1950 



107 



overall 



National advertisers like Bayer As- 
pirin. General Mills and Procter & 
Gamble recognize the importance of 
spot radio in marginal time periods, 
especially the early morning as day- 
time sponsorship comes into fuller 
vogue. P & G has just started a new 
series, Hits From the Hills, over WSM 
in an unrated time period. Other sta- 
tions will be added. Stations like WLS, 
WHO. KWKH, WWVA, WBT, KWTO 
have bulging dossiers on the resultful- 
ness of early morning time. 

E. P. J. Shurick, radio market re- 
search counsel for CBS. says as far as 
the overall network picture is con- 
cerned there has been no significant 
shift in the use of marginal time. If 
vou consider Saturday morning as 
marginal, CBS is now solidly commer- 
cial for that period with Coca-Cola, 
Hormel, Toni. Armour and Company, 
Pillsbury Mills and Armstrong Cork 
on the air. Sunday morning is show- 
ing more commercial vitality, too. 

Listening between the hours of 11 
p.m. and 7 a.m. is down, but there 
are no indications to show it is the 
start of a trend. A. C. Nielsen reports 
the following figures to SPONSOR: 

April overall listening in all 

homes down 10%. 

Marginal time 111 p.m. -7 a.m.) 

down 15%. 

Marginal time in the Eastern 

time zone down 13%; in the 

Central time zone down 21%; 

in the Pacific time zone down 

12%. 

Q. Will there be more 24-hour 
stations operating this fall? 

A. The majority of those questioned 
say there is no appreciable increase in 
the number of stations going on the air 
24 hours. Dan Dennenholz. promotion 
manager of the Katz Agency, believes 
if there is any activity at all it's slight- 
ly upward. Ray Simms. radio time 
buyer at Erwin, Wasey, says no 
marked increase is coming to his at- 
tention. 

Q. What types of advertisers use 
the after-midnight hours? 

A. Restaurants, nighteries, beverage 
manufacturers and airlines seem to be 
prominent among the after-midnight 
radio advertisers. A random listing 
shows these wee-morning hour adver- 
tisers: White Tower Restaurants in 
Dayton, New York, Detroit, Washing- 
ton, Rochester and Albany. Florida 



Air Coach: Prior Beer: Chateau Mar- 
tin Wine; Hobby of the Month; Ken- 
dex (a nylon sales company); Slim- 
suit la weight reducing outfit I on 
WOR. Bird-in-Hand Restaurant; RCA 
Victor: Crawford Clothes: Canadian 
Furs: Barney's on WNEW. 



Telephone shows 



Q. What is the trend in telephone 
programs? 

A. There are two trends, not one. The 
highwater mark of netivork telephone 
giveaways has passed. The only ones 
that have lasted through the boom of 
five to 10 years ago offer entertainment 
as well as prizes. As CBS associate 
director of sales promotion Louis 
Hausman puts it: "Today's programs 
no longer offer $9,000,000 to the first 
person who picks up the phone. To 
keep their large audience, they get the 
listener involved in some basically in- 
teresting situation, some conflict. It's 
the entertainment, not the prizes, that 
hold network audience." 

Trend number two: The present sta- 
bility in the number of network phone 
programs contrasts sharply with the 
growth of such programs in individual 
stations around the country. Syndi- 
cated telephone quiz shows are going 
strong in particular. TeUo-test, a lead- 
ing example, covers 110 markets. But 
most cities have their own variations 
of musical quizzes, bingo, or straight 
questions. 

Two minor trends are worth noting: 

1. Masters of ceremonies call the 
listener in the vast majority of cases. 
In the exceptions, like the Harry Good- 
man Telephone Game, special equip- 
ment must be installed by the telephone 
company. Extensive listener call-ins 
upset normal service, impair emergen- 
cy communications. 

2. Jackpots on network shows are 
falling off in size. Sing It Again, for 
example, recently cut its big prize to a 
maximum of $10,000 in merchandise 
and $5,000 in cash. Jackpot used to 
start at $25,000 in merchandise and an 
equal amount in cash which mounted 
up as the "Phantom Voice" went uni- 
dentified. 



Q. What attracts so many listen- 
ers to telephone programs? 

A. Practically every telephone show is 
also a giveaway, which immediately 



gives it the powerful "something for 
nothing" appeal. Here are some other 
things listeners get: 

1. Entertainment (quiz tunes, chat- 
ter, skits). 

2. A feeling of superiority when 
contestants muff the easy questions. 

3. A chance to learn about contes- 
tants, satisfying the curiosity all peo- 
ple have about other human beings. 

Q. What types of sponsors are us- 
ing telephone shows? 

A, This type of program can be used 
by every kind of advertiser land is l . 
Some network samples: 

Stop the Music (ABC) : Speidel Co. 
I watchbands). Trimount Clothing Co., 
Old Gold. 

Stop the Music (TV ) : Admiral 
Corp. (radio & TV sets), Old Gold. 

Sing It Again (CBS), Carters Prod- 
ucts Co. (Arrid). 

Queen For a Day (MBS), Miles 
Laboratories (Alka Seltzer I . 

Hit the Jackpot ( CBS ) , Lever Bros. 
I Rinso) . 

Some of the Tello-test sponsors over 
the country are representative of other 
syndicated telephone program adver- 
tisers: 

Walgreen Drug Stores, New Orleans. 

Meyer Jewelry Co., Washington. Pa. 

Sterling Furniture Co., Eugene. Ore. 

Filene's Dept. Store, Boston. 

Snow's Laundry, Savannah. 

Q. What network shows are avail- 
able now for sponsorship? 

A. There are 15-minute segments 
available on these programs: 

Stop the Music, ABC, one 15-minute 
segment. 

Sing It Again, CBS, three 15-minute 
segments. 

(Above subject to change.) 



Q. What syndicated telephone 
shows are available? 

A. The following representative sam- 
ples of better-known shows can be 
bought provided they are not already 
sponsored in your market: 

1. Tello-test — Radio Features, Inc., 
75 East Wacker Drive, Chicago. Used 
in 110 markets. Questions with uni- 
versal appeal are asked over the tele- 
phone. Prizes in merchandise supplied 
at no extra cost by package producer. 
Cost depends on market size. 

2. Tune-o — Richard H. Ullman, 
Inc., 295 Delaware Ave., Buffalo. Na- 



108 



SPONSOR 




JOHN W. CANTWELL, COMPTON ADV. PREMIUM SPECIALIST, SEES FALL 1950 STRONG IN BOTH AIR AND POINT-OF-SALE OFFERS 



tional distribution. Bingo with a musi- 
cal twist. Guess the song titles to win. 
Merchandise prizes can usually be ar- 
ranged through the package producer. 

3. Tele-Kid Test — Radio Features, 
Inc. (see No. 1). National distribu- 
tion. For youngsters up to 16 years 
old who get their names on a call list 
by writing an "acceptable" letter. Sim- 
ple questions which draw a double au- 
dience — both children and parents. 
Both sides of phone conversations are 
broadcast by transcription. Merchan- 
dise prizes and war savings bonds. 

4. Know Your America — W. E. 
Long Co.. 188 W. Randolph St., Chi- 
cago. Six-year-old patriotic quiz pro- 
gram. Based on telephone questions 
about American historical vignettes. 
Inspirational music and comment. 



Prizes in popular Detroit market: por- 
table Arvin radios. 

5. Do You Know the Answer?— 
W. E. Long Co. (see No. 4). In more 
than 30 markets. Length easily adjust- 
able, since announcer merely asks 
phone respondent, "Do you know the 
answer?" The answer is some part of 
the sponsor's advertising message. 
Prizes could be money or merchandise. 

6. People Know Everything — W. E. 
Long Co. (see No. 51. National distri- 
bution. Listeners without phones can 
also compete, by writing in questions 
for telephone respondents to answer. 
A correct answer splits the deposit be- 
tween questioner and respondent. 
Prizes could be either money or mer- 
chandise. 

7. Who's Talking?— Hal Tate Ra- 



dio Productions, 831 S. Wabash Ave., 
Chicago. Used in over 20 markets. 
Telephone contestants must identify a 
"Phantom Voice" by listening to re- 
corded clues. "Mystery photographs" 
placed in sponsor's store furnish an ad- 
ditional clue, draw store traffic. 

8. Radio — I. F. I. Advertising Co., 
Duluth, Minn. Bingo with a new an- 
gle. Listeners make out their own "ra- 
dio" card numbers, if they score, sta- 
tion operators check duplicate cards 
filed in advance. 



Q. How much do telephone give- 
away programs cost? 
A. Telephone giveaways on network 
cost about the same as mystery pro- 
grams. Which means that they are 
very reasonable compared to comedv 



17 JULY 1950 



109 



overall 



or variety. Mysteries at night average 
about $4,000 per 15-minute segment. 
Sample comedies often range from 
$10,000 upward. First-year package 
costs for network radio telephone give- 
aways follow. 

Sing It Again — $3,100 for 15-min- 
utes. 

Stop the Music — $3,350 for 15-min- 
utes. 

(Syndicated telephone program costs 
vary with the size of a particular mar- 
ket. Prices must be obtained for indi- 
vidual cases from the package owners.) 



Q. How do telephone giveaways 
stand today in relation to the anti- 
lottery law? 

A. Stringent FCC interpretations of 
the anti-lottery law are in abeyance 
until network and FCC lawyers get 
a hearing in federal court early this 
fall. Loser will probably appeal to the 
Supreme Court for a reversal. If the 
FCC wins, here are the conditions un- 
der which a telephone giveaway would 
be considered illegal : 

1. If winners are required to fur- 
nish any money or thing of value, or 
are required to possess any product 




A triple play is a bonanza to any ball club; unfortunately only one 
or two occur a season to gladden the hearts of baseball fans. In 
PEORIAREA, however, WMBD advertisers get a triple play for their 
advertising dollar many times a year. 

MORE LISTENERS... 

WBMD delivers a greater share of the audience . . . more 
listeners in ANY TIME SEGMENT than the next two stations 
combined! 

MORE PROMOTION . . . 

To maintain such dominance in a competitive market, 
WMBD's promotion and merchandising department devotes 
full time to courtesy announcements, newspaper ads, displays, 
direct mail and merchandising publications. 




MORE EXPERIENCE... 



f 



With 23 years' experience, WMBD knows the Peoriarea audi- 
ence . . . beams the right show to the right people at the 
right time. High program standards have brought an in- 
creasing number of WMBD live shows under national sponsor- 
ship. 




sold by the program's sponsor. 

2. If winners must be listening to or 
watching the program to win. 

3. If winners are asked a question 
whose answer was given over the same 
station. Even help in answering the 
question or a previous broadcast of 
the question alone will be considered 
illegal. 

4. If winners must answer the 
phone in a prescribed way (such as 
giving the sponsor's name or product I . 
provided this way of answering has 
been broadcast over the station airing 
the program. 

Adoption of these rules would wash 
out most bingo variations, all mystery 
tune programs ( unless the tune were 
played for the telephone respondent's 
benefit), and all programs where the 
respondent answers the phone with a 
sponsors name or a phrase. Checking 
through the present telephone quiz 
games at random, the mortality rate 
among those programs would seem to 
be tremendous. 

Q. Are there any telephone pro- 
grams on TV, and, if so, who is 
sponsoring them? 

A. There are few such shows on TV 
so far. Here are the network programs 
now in operation: 

Stop the Music ( ABC ) , a one-hour 
TV version of the radio giveaway- Ad- 
miral Corp. and Old Gold have a half- 
hour each. 

A few samples of local TV telephone 
shows are: 

Telephone Game (WJZ-TV. New 
York, WFIL-TV, Philadelphia, WGN- 
TV, Chicago). A variation of bingo 
in which winners must circle their tele- 
phone numbers or the last five digits 
of their social security numbers. MC 
asks a question with two possible an- 
swers, each of which carries a number. 
Numerous participations, including 
American Home Products and Swift & 
Co. 

Name the Star (WFIL-TV). A tele- 
phone sports quiz run by Tom Moore- 
head. A jackpot question concerns the 
identity of some present or past star 
athlete. Sponsored by Regina Cigar 
Co. for Hillcrest Cigars. 

Get on the Line (WLW-TV, Cincin- 
nati). A musical quiz with orchestra 
and vocalists offering minimum jack- 
pot of $1,000 in merchandise. Insti- 
tuted to offset loss of network shows 
over the summer. All participations 
bought by sponsors which range from 



110 



SPONSOR 



overall 



beer to gas conversion burner compa- 
nies. 

Q. What is the difference be- 
tween radio and TV telephone 
shows? 

A. Goodson & Todman. package pro- 
ducers of Stop the Music and Hit the 
Jackpot, find TV telephone giveaways 
no easy job to produce. They report 
a lack of writers who can frame "vis- 
ual questions" that lend themselves to 
dramatization. On Stop the Music, 
elaborate variety numbers are the big- 
gest part of the show. These cost mon- 
ey and run the price up. A half-hour 
of Stop the Music costs $6,500 for 
package use on TV. 



Media research 



Q. Who is doing what in radio and 
TV research? What techniques 
are used? 






GAS&01U 




LANG WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS, In*. 

113 W. 57th ST.. NEW YORK 19. N. Y. 



JVrtuvri Calibre FrMrams at JCtval Staliou Cost 



A. Numerous small TV research or- 
ganizations have sprung up since TV 
became a major advertising force. 
Many of them lack personnel with the 
specialized research background essen- 
tial to the complex and many-sided 
game of research. Advertisers should 
check exactinglv the qualifications of 
any research firm before depending on 
it for research guidance. Listed below 
are some of the more active firms in 
TV and radio research. 

Advertest Research, New Brunswick 
and Newark, N. J.; measurement of ra- 
dio and television audience habits and 



reactions i personal interview). 

American Research Bureau, Wash- 
ington, I). C: radio and television au- 
dience measurement (dian I. 

Robert S. Conlan, Kansas City, Mis- 
souri; radio and TV program reports, 
-pel ial surveys (telephone coinciden- 
tal!. 

C. E. Hooper, New York, radio and 
TV program reports, special surveys 
I telephone coincidental) . 

.lav & Graham Research, Chicago, 
Videodex ratings, quantitative and 
qualitative TV audience rating service 
( diary) . 



WPRO AUDIENCE LEADERSHIP 

GREATER THAN EVER! 



VCompare the 1949-1950 Winter-Spring Hooper 
Audience Index for Providence-Pawtucket with 
the seasonal index one year ago. 

\/You'll find VVPRO's first-place audience leader- 
ship in New England's SECOND LARGEST MAR- 
KET is greater than ever! 

V WPRO's Share of Audience is greater than the 
second-place station by: 



WPRO WINTER-SPRING STATION 
AUDIENCE INDEX LEADERSHIP 



7948-7949 



1949 - 1950 



MORNING 

8 A.M. -NOON 
MON. thru FRI. 

AFTERNOON 

NOON-6 P.M. 
MON. thru FRI. 

EVENING 

6-10:30 P.M. 
SUN. thru SAT. 



. 84.2% . . . 152.4% 



59.0% . . . 73.5 







31.6% . ■ . 50.2% 



WPRO 



PROVIDENCE 



BASIC CBS I 5000 WATTS 



AM & FM 



630 KC. 



Represented by Raymer 



17 JULY 1950 



111 



overall 



Market Research of Cleveland: ra- 
dio research for Midwest stations ad- 
vertisers and agencies. 

A. C. Nielsen Company. New York; 
in-home personal set listening (Audi- 
meter attachments). 

The Pulse. New York: surveys in- 
home and out-of-home radio listening 
habits: radio TV market research I me- 
ter I . 

Schwerin Research. New York: ra- 
dio and TV program testing and quali- 
tative research (panel). 

Albert Sindlinger. Philadelphia; spe- 
cial radio and TV surveys I electronic 
monitor) . 



Iii-li«iiie personal set 
listening 



Q. What is being done to measure 
in-home personal set listening? 

A. Radio generally has failed to mea- 
sure a major type of listening: per- 
sonal listening in the home. Individu- 
al set listening goes on in the kitchen, 
bedroom, bathroom, den and work- 
shop. However, studies by Pulse, 
Whan. Nielsen. American Research 
Bureau. Sindlinger. and others have 
brought the industry's attention to a 



Now being s 




the Central 
Ohio Market 




■ ~w 



on a platter 



Buying Power in central Ohio is the 
187,980 WBNS families with income 
of $1,387,469,000. Both local and 
national advertisers know from expe- 
rience that effective selling in this 
market means WBNS plus WELD-FM. 
They have the proof that this station 
delivers the results at lower cost. 

ASK JOHN BLAIR 

POWER WBNS 5000 - WELD 53,000 CBS COLUMBUS, OHIO 




vast, heretofore uncounted, audience. 

A typical Pulse survey of in-home 
listening is conducted along these lines: 
an interviewer makes monthly calls in 
person at homes in 12 New York coun- 
ties. The roster recall technique is 
used. That is. each member of the 
family present is questioned about his 
or her activities during the four-hour 
period prior to the interviewer's call. 
If they have been listening to the ra- 
dio, a listing of shows is presented to 
them and they note the ones they've 
heard during that four-hour period. 
Audience composition is also deter- 
mined by Pulse from their roster re- 
call data. 

A. C. Nielsen measures in-home per- 
sonal set listening by means of Audi- 
meters. Some 1,500 homes make up a 
representative sampling, with 35% of 
the homes containing more than one 
radio I usually two or three). An Au- 
dimeter is attached to each set to re- 
cord per set listening done in the mul- 
tiple-set home. Findings show that the 
number of extra listening hours is al- 
most in direct proportion to the num- 
ber of extra sets in the home. 

C. E. Hooper conducts a coinciden- 
tal phone survey to determine the 
amount of radio and TV listening be- 
ing done. If the person called is listen- 
ing to the radio or viewing TV, he is 
asked what he's listening to — what pro- 
gram, what station, how many people 
are viewing or listening, is there an- 
other radio or TV set being used in 
the house at the time the call is made? 
Surveys are conducted in 100 different 
markets. 

The WHO 1950 study, conducted by 
Forrest Whan, reveals that although 
98.9 f ( of Iowa homes have radio, only 
51.2% are one-set homes; 35.6% have 
two sets; 13.2% three sets or more. 
The percentage of multiple set homes 
is markedly up since the 1949 count. 
WHO also reports that 38.9%» of the 
two-set homes made simultaneous use 
of their radios; 61.8% of the three set 
homes used two or more simultaneous- 
lv. WHO found. 



Q. How do number of radio homes, 
sets, and hours of listening com- 
pare in 1950 with previous years? 

A. From approximately 28.500.000 
radio families in 1940 the total has 
risen to nearly 41,000,000 in 1950 
I based on 1950 census estimates). Ac- 
cording to Nielsen, 6% of the increase 
in radio families has come within the 



112 



SPONSOR 



;new stars 

I IN THE 

1 SOUTH!,.. 




WITH 

CBS 

programs .... 
and 




WITH 

66%* 

Population Gain 



MOBILE 1940 1950 

CITY 78,720 127,010 

METROPOLITAN 

AREA 114,906 190,300 

COUNTY 141,974 227,408 



...AND STILL 

! GROWING! 

I NATIONAL REP. 

• ADAM J. YOUNG, 




last three years. Nielsen also estimates 
that hecause of an 8.5' « increase in ra- 
dio homes in the last three years the 
decline in Listening (due to TV) has 
been offset. In fact, the number of 
home hours of listening is exactly the 
same in January. 1950 as the average 
for the previous three years. 

This doesn't take into account listen- 
ing to 14.000.000 automobile radios, 
2.000.000 portable radios, and sundry 
other out-of-home listening. Nor does 
it credit the listening to "secondary" 
sets in the home. 

According to an incomplete Nielsen 
estimate, current listening totals 200,- 
000.000 hours daily as compared to 
156,000,000 in 1946 and 129,000,000 
in 1943. 



Out-of-home listening 



Q. What is being done to measure 
out-of-home listening? 

A. A few years ago out-of-home lis- 
tening was overlooked bv sellers of 
broadcast advertising. Yet. the Psy- 
chological Corporation of New York, 
in a 1948 study made for NBC and 
CBS, found that 14% of all listening 
takes place outside the home. Now 
out-of-home listening surveys by Pulse 
provide data continuously on this im- 
portant segment of radio's listening au- 
dience. 

Rather than checking only on car 
listening to arrive at a rating, Pulse 
analyzes all out-of-home listening — 
stores, bars and grills, beaches and oth- 
er public places. Often out-of-home lis- 
tening habits are determined by in- 
home surveys. Typical is a Pulse sur- 
vey made in New York during the first 
week of February, 1950, when 2,100 
families were interviewed in their 
homes. They were questioned about 
their radio listening outside their 
homes that day or the previous eve- 
ning. As a result, WNEW, for whom 
the study was made, now claims that 
for every six in-home advertising im- 
pressions it delivers one out-of-home 
impression. 

This summer Pulse will continue its 
out-of-home surveys in 10 markets: 
New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Phil- 
adelphia, San Francisco, Boston, Wash- 
ington, St. Louis, Cincinnati and Rich- 
mond. Reports for New York will con- 
tinue on a quarterly basis while semi- 
annual surveys will be made in the 



17 JULY 1950 




overall 



THRIFTY 

Coverage 

The great Mid-South, that choice 
lush portion of the Mississippi Valley 
centering on Memphis, represents a 
market of brilliant potential ( already 
it's the South's LARGEST trading 
area). WHBG\ with goodwill gained 
from a quarter -century of sincere 
service, presents its advertisers with 
a splendid coverage that brings posi- 
tive results for every penny invested. 

The accent is on "THRIFTY," for 
our 5000 watt ( 1000-night) WHBQ, 
pounding out on 560 k.c. (first on the 
dial) is rate-structured to give you 
REGIONAL saturation at little more 
than what you might expect the 
local rate to be! 

TELL US OR TELL WEED that 
you'd like additional facts re our 

4% MAGIC 

IN THE 

.J MID- 
SOUTH 




Represented Nationally By WEED & Co. 



nine other markets. 

The Iowa Radio Audience Survey 
assesses out-of-home listening in the 
Fall Corn state. Conducted annually 
for the past 12 years by Dr. F. L. 
Whan of Wichita University for WHO 
Des Moines, it's based on personal in- 
terviews with over 9,000 Iowa families 
scientifically selected from cities, 
towns, villages and farms throughout 
the state. The Whan survey pinpoints 
the importance of out-of-home fact- 
finding by revealing in the 1950 sur- 
vey that 58.1% of all Iowa families 
have auto radios; and 14.3% of all 
barns are radio-equipped I write WHO 
for complete study). 

Q. Are many advertisers showing 
interest in the finding of out-of- 
home and multiple set listening 
surveys? To what extent are they 
using this information? 
A. Acquainting advertisers with the 
fact that there is an out-of-home audi- 
ence and a multiple set listening audi- 
ence is an educational process. Like 
any educational process it takes time. 
Station salesmen have seen signs of a 
growing acceptance and awareness of 
this plus audience. The fact that Pulse 
is expanding into additional markets 
this summer is added evidence that ad- 
vertisers are interested. 



Premiums 



Q. What's the trend in use of 
premiums this fall on radio and 
TV? 

A. Strongly up in both media. Tight- 
er competition always leads more ad- 
vertisers to use premiums and to in- 
creased use by those already using 
them. The trend, inaugurated after the 
war, will hit a new high this fall. The 
avalanche of premium offers on TV, 
especially on kid shows, hasn't dimin- 
ished radio offers in the least. Radio 
premiums are important as business 
stimulators in non-TV areas. 

The biggest stimulus to the rising 
premium curve will come from adver- 
tisers who have previously used this 
means of hypoing sales infrequently or 
not at all. Backbone of the "some- 
thing extra" business has always been 
sellers of rapid turnover items like soap 
and various packaged food items. Pow- 
er of the added attraction will lure a 
greater variety of sponsors than here- 



Best Buy in 

SOUTHERN 

NEW ENGLAND 

WTIC 



"Sponsor Loyalty 

Depends 
Upon Results" 

These current sponsors are 
a few of the many who 
have been WTIC spot ad- 
vertisers for 10 or more 
years. 

Bulova Watch Co. 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co. 

Continental Baking Co., Inc. 

Peter Paul, Inc. 

The Procter & Gamble Co. 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. 

The Studebaker Corp. 

PAUL W. MORENCY 
Vice President-General Manager 

WALTER JOHNSON 
Assistant General Mgr. -Sales Mgr. 

WTIC's 50,000 Watts 

Represented nationally by 

WEED & COMPANY 




WTBC 

THE PROSPEROUS 

/WjARKJET 




114 



SPONSOR 



overall 



tofore. Hard-hitting ability of the air 
media to get immediate action — which 
s is what premium bargains try to force 
— will attract additional users into the 
fold this fall. 

Q. Is there any difference be- 
tween radio and TV premiums? 

A. Anything used on radio can be 
used on TV, but TV offers the oppor- 
tunity to use items that "perform," 
whether they be objects that children 
can manipulate with their hands, or 
adult premiums with use value. TV 
can handle a greater variety of premi- 
ums because it can offer items that re- 
quire display or demonstration to 
bring out their properties. 

Q. Will the biggest increase be in 
kid or adult premiums? 

A. The increase will be largely in 
adult household-type items. Two rea- 
sons have accelerated this trend. 
Housewives have discovered that by 
and large they get good value in items 
obtained through premium deals. Pre- 
mium manufacturers generally have 
discovered it's good business to give 
better values, and today most adver- 
tisers insist on it. 

There's not likely to be any decrease 
in kid premiums, this fall or for sev- 
eral years, because the bumper crop of 
1947 babies will be coming of premi- 
um age. 

Q. Will there be any change in the 
kind of programs on which premi- 
ums are offered? 

A. Except for nighttime shows ( on 
which premiums have never succeed- 
ed ) there is scarcely any kind of pro- 
gram on which premiums haven't been 
offered successfully, including news 
and disk jockey, and there's nothing 
to indicate a change. But daytime se- 
rials, kid shows on radio, women's ser- 
vice-type programs, kid shows on TV 
will continue to be the mainstays for 
coin and boxtop deals. There'll be still 
more shows aimed at the TV-fascinated 
eyes of youngsters in the fall, and that 
will automatically open up more op- 
portunities for enticing their dimes and 
quarters with gadgets and gimcracks. 
But just anything won't do — it takes 
testing, imagination, and willingness 
to gamble a little to bring off reallv 
successful premium promotions to the 
youngsters. 




Man builds pipeline 
between buyers and sellers 

Here's a man who can build you a pipe line between 
sellers and buyers. This versatile "plumber" accom- 
plishes results with his carefully followed commentary 
on the national scene. 

As Mr. Maurice A. Hill of the Warren County Hardware 
Co. wrote to Station WLBJ, both of Bowling Green, 
Kentucky: 

"Mr. Lewis' news broadcast continues, as it has in past 
years, to do a very gratifying sales job for us. 
"The program is of great value to the firm as a direct 
sales medium and for the good will and added prestige 
it gives us . . . In our opinion Mr. Lewis' straight- 
forward and informal manner makes his program the 
best newscast on the air." 

The Fulton Lewis, Jr. program, currently sponsored on 
more than 300 stations, offers local advertisers a ready- 
made audience at local time cost, with pro-rated talent 
cost. Since there are more than 500 MBS stations, there 
may be an opening in your locality. Check your 
Mutual outlet — or the Co-operative Program Department. 
Mutual Broadcasting System, 1440 Broadway, NYC 
18 (or Tribune Tower, Chicago 11). 



17 JULY 1950 



115 



overall 



Q. Will $0.75-1.00 premiums be 
popular on the air next fall? 

A. There's nothing on the current ho- 
rizon to indicate the ladies still won! 
go for a bargain value at these prices. 
But there's a perceptible trend toward 
less expensive offers: even so, a dud at 
a dollar costs more, including loss of 
good will. Items costing more than a 
dollar never have gone too well, though 
there are exceptions. There'll be more 
50c offers next fall. 

It's different with kids. You don't 
win the heart of a mother with two 
or three youngsters by exciting them 
with premiums that cost more than 
25c. especially with the number of such 



attractions on the air. The big deals 
will be 10-25c offers. 

Q. WiSI self-liquidating premiums 
be used as much as heretofore? 

A. Yes. There will be a heavy in- 
crease in "factory pack." or point-of- 
sale premium packages. These contain 
the premium either inside the package 
or bound to it in some way. A varia- 
tion calls for the retailer to give the 
premium with the purchase. These of- 
fers are sometimes plugged on the air. 
But these deals won't decrease the use 
of radio and TV since in most cases 
they represent additional use of premi- 
ums rather than less. 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PiOWe&l RADIO STATION 



1949 BMB 



Day— 110,590 families in 36 counties 
Night— 85,830 families in 31 counties 

ftvtct 
3 to 7 days weekly: 

Day— 90,320 families 
Mo/Af- 66,230 families 



(Retail sales in the area 
are over $600 million yearly) 



Get the entire story from 
FREE & PETERS 



CBS • 5000 WATTS . 960 K 

Owned and Operated by the 
TIMES- WORLD CORPORATION 

ROANOKE. VA 

FREE & PETERS. INC.. National Representatives 



Q. Are many new advertisers turn- 
ing to premiums? 

A. Yes. Most of them are manufac- 
turers of quick turnover items. Mak- 
ers of candy and chewing gum. for ex- 
ample, are turning to the "something 
extra ' appeal. But there's a definitely 
growing interest among makers of ap- 
pliances and other long-lasting items. 
Numerous smaller firms throughout 
the country will be trying for extra 
sales via premiums — they're impressed 
with results that bigger firms seem to 
get with bargain incentives. Some of 
this activity will be reflected in local 
radio and TV promotions. 



Contests 



Q. What's doing on the contest 
front? 

A. Other networks agree with ABC's 
Ted Oberfelder. who says: "Contests 
on radio are generally at the same lev- 
el as thev have been in recent years. 
There is the usual peak in September 
when shows come back after the sum- 
mer hiatus, and the usual summer 



dump.' 



WLEC 



SANDUSKY 



THE HEART OF OHIO'S 
VACATION LAND" 

t 

Call Everett-McKinney 
for details on the hi- 
hoopers and coverage 
of one of the best buys 
in radio today. 

T 

A PLUS MUTUAL STATION 



116 



SPONSOR 



overall 



Q. Why do companies run con- 
tests? 

A. For one or a combination of the 
following reasons: 

1. A straight merchandising scheme 
to move goods. 

2. To hypo listening or viewing for 
the sponsor's program after its return 
from the summer hiatus. 

3. To boost a program rating at an\ 
lime of the year. 

4. To help local distributors build 
store traffic, encourage closer manufac- 
turer-distributor relations. 

5. To get some idea of a shows pop- 
ularity, other than a mere rating. 

6. To promote a new product or re- 
vive an old one. 

Q. How does a sponsor go about 
setting up a contest? 

A. Usually the manufacturer works 
out the germ of an idea for a contest, 
then turns this over to his advertising 
agency, who, with the assistance of an 
experienced judging organization, 
works out the details of the plan. 
The advertising ageny will work 
out the copy and the promotion; 
the judging firm works out the rules 
and mechanical details of judging. The 



— — — ' 'Jil.J'Miim ^.iHjuU J w 



SARATOGA RAG 
ASSOCIATION 

SARATOGA, N. Y. 
selects 

WROW 

TO BROADCAST 

the Exciting Harness Races 
For its 1950 Season (Exclusive) 



YOU will do well 
to select WROW 
for New York's 
3rd Creat Market 



It costs you less per thousand 
listeners on WROW 



Ask 

THE BOLLINC COMPANY 

5,000 Watts • 590 K.C. 




ALBANY, N. Y. BASIC MUTUAL 



judging organization is thus in the pic- 
ture to take over the complete respon- 
sibility for mail handling and judging. 
One such firm is the Reuben H. Don- 
nelley Corporation. 305 East 45th 
Street, New York (lily, which has a 
reputation for handling about 75% of 
all national contests. 

Besides taking over the clerical re- 
sponsibility, the Donnelle\ Corpora- 
tion is the sponsor's "insurance policy" 
indemnifying them against claims of 
erroneous or impartial judging. Every 
contest format is examined by them 
from the legal angle, and by reason of 
their experience they are usually in a 
position to gauge its possible success. 

Q. Are there any general rules of 
thumb in running contests? 



A. Yes. Henrietta Davis, Contest Di- 
rector of The Reuben H. Donnelley 
Corporation, lists a few : 

1. The amount spent on media pro- 
motion of a contest should be roughly 
five times the total amount spent on 
prizes. If the contest features $50,000 
in prizes, for instance, promotion ex- 
penses should total about $250,000. 

2. Spread promotion over several 
media, not just one. Usually radio and 
newspapers and magazines are used, al- 
though some sponsors might also use 
billboards and car cards as well. 

3. Keep the biggest part of the con- 
test promotion at the dealer level by 
distributing entry blanks through them, 
supplying advertising mats for cooper- 
ative local advertising. Supply or en- 
courage store displays which tie-in 



* 



radio stations everywhere 




but only one 




In your search for radio results, take a long 
look at WSM, the station with power to cover 

its market anil programming persuasiveness to turn coverage into 
listeners. And for convincing evidence of WSM's unique program 
and talent potential, focus on this fact — in addition to regular sta- 
tion business, WSM is currently originating sixteen network programs 
weekly. Do you know of another station anywhere with the quality 
and quantity of talent to do that kind of job? Want more facts!" 
Ask Irving VVaugh or any Petry man. 



CLEAR CHANNEL 
50,000 WATTS 

MARRr STONE 

IRVING WAUGM 

ComiMfdoJ Monog*, 
EDWARD RETRY & CO 

Nolionol Rep/rie Mo'.,* 



17 JULY 1950 



117 



overall 



with the contest. 

4. Look over the contest field care- 
fully before launching yours. No point 
in getting "lost in the shuffle'' of }>\ii- 
time contests — if you can help it. Since 
contest opening dates are usually strict- 
ly secret, the chances of advance warn- 
ing are slim, however. 

5. Launching a contest through a 
continuing program is more effective 
than using spot announcements. 

6. Arrange your prize budget to pro- 
vide a single large prize and main 
smaller ones. Large one makes good 
copy, many smaller ones encourage 



contestants to believe they have a win- 
nine chance. 



FALL FORECAST 

( Continued from page 3 1 i 

and Midwest cities this summer with 
Felso, a synthetic detergent. 

Dial (Armour) and Sweetheart 
Soap (Manhattan Soap) do well re- 
gionally. They'll be using the air this 
fall. Spot activity is evidenced, in ad- 
dition to the Big Three, by Cuticura. 
Pears. Dial, and others. 




< 



Most Potent 
sales force in all Alaska is 
the powerful KFAR-KENI combination. 
No other advertising medium can as ef- 
fectively tap the new riches of this fast- 
growing new market of above-average 
consumers. 




This modern farm 
Implement display room at Sunset 
Motors in Anchorage is typical of booming, bustling 
Alaska. Whether it's farm equipment, electric razors 
...deep freezers or home permanent wave sets, the 
NEW Alaska is a big and growing market for them all! 



MIDNIGHT SUN BROADCASTING CO. 



KFAR, FAIRBANKS 

10,000 Watts, 660 KC 
(Sold separately— 



KENI, ANCHORAGE 

5,000 Watts, 550 KC 
in Combination at 20% Discount) 



GILBERT A. WELLINGTON, Nat'l Adv. Mgr. 
5546 White-Henry-Stuart Bldg., Seattle 



ADAM J, YOUNG. Jr.. Inc., East. Rep. 
New York • Chicago 



14. Dentifrices, hair preparations, 
razor blades, shampoos, shaving 
preparations will be active in radio 
and TV come September. There 
should be quite a scrap among the 
dentifrices, with everyone's eye on the 
38% that Colgate, paste and powder, 
has garnered. Pepsodent can be 
looked to invest heavily in advertis- 
ing. Amm-i-dent (Block) does hard 
and intelligent advertising. Some 
brands that will come in for spot treat- 
ment include Arrid (Carter Products), 
Doeskin Tissues, Cutex Manicure Spe- 
cialties (Northam Warren), Marlin 
Blades. LaFrance ( General Foods ) . 
Ajax Cleanser and Halo Shampoo 
(C-P-Pl. Vitalis and Ipana ( Bristol- 
Myers I , Mennen, Drene. Halving of 
the 20'< retail tax on toiletries would 
bring more advertising this fall. 

15. The cold remedies will flood 
radio and TV, especially the former, 
during the fourth quarter. Eyeing the 
night breaks, closing on periods from 
earliest morning marginal time to late 
night are such advertisers (practicalb 
all of a seasonal nature) as Dolcin. 
Lydia Pinkham, 4-Way Cold Tablets. 
Antamine. and Bromo-Quinine Cold* 
Tablets (Grove), Musterole, Pertussin 
(Seeck & Kade), Feen-A-Mint I Phar- 
macol. Scott's Emulsion (Eno-Scott & 
Bowne). Dr. Pierces Golden Medical 
Discovery (Pierce's Proprietaries), 
Anacin. Hill's and Guards Cold Tab- 
lets (Whitehall), Vick, Hadacol ( Le 
Blanc Labs. I. Ex-Lax. Rem (Maryland 
Pharmaceutical ) . B. C. Headache Rem- 
edies. Stanback Headache Powders, 
Saraka (Union Pharmaceutical), Ome- 
ga Oil (Block Drugh and Luden's 
Cough Drops. 

Several of these regulars, buoyed by 
the stabilitv of drug sales and oppor- 
tunities via radio, will be using the 
medium more vigorously than hereto- 
fore. Proprietaries are experts on spot 
and their earlv activity this summer 
indicates their feeling that good avail- 
abilities will be hard to locate later on. 

Firms like Sterling Drugs are ex- 
pressing their confidence in radio with 
52-week renewals. 

16. Emergence of TV appears to 
have stimulated newspaper-bound 
department store advertising de- 
partments to a full look at the air 
media. Better business may speed the 
endeavor. The NRDGA Controllers 
Congress predicted in June that retail 
business would flourish throughout the 



118 



SPONSOR 



fall, with the following factors chiefly 
responsible: (1) impact of Veterans 
Insurance dividends. (2) heavy Inn- 
ing of home furnishings. 

Today the department store is high- 
ly cost-conscious and is in a mood to 
make his advertising dollar go as far 
as possible, regardless of tradition. In 
this atmosphere, such studies as those 
made by ARBI, showing the sales ef- 
fectiveness of radio vs. newspapers at 
point of sale, may be closely examined. 
So will the staggering examples of TV 
selling ability. 

Expressing the problem of the de- 
partment stores, in 1948 they kept 3.hV 
of every dollar taken in; in 1949 2.7£. 
Such expediencies as fewer sales peo- 
ple, pooling of stockboys, department 
mergers, self-service departments, ship- 
ping pools are being tried. No one can 
deny that the department store is in a 
squeeze. Along with the cut-cost ef- 
forts, the stores can improve their net 
by using advertising to greatest effect. 
The NRDGA and BAB are helping 



LOCAL 

Irocramminc . . . 



Q 

Q 
Q 



that cleverly complements national 
shows. Ask about THE DAYBREAKER 
. . . FAVORITE FIVE. 



ARTICIPATIONS... 

tops in town for response. Ask about 
LUCKY 7. BEST BY REQUEST. 



ERSONALITIES . . . 

well known, well liked local names 
p!ns Mutual's array of stars. 




FOR ADVERTISERS ON 



5000 

WATTS 




C>^ 



IN ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Represented Nationally by 
WEED & COMPANY 



open department store eyes to the val- 
ues of the air media. A growing num- 
ber of case histories arc now on record 
and available for perusal. 

i 

17. Home furnishings are racking 
up record sales thus far in 1050 on 
the wings of the home building boom. 
For example, Bigelow-Sanford Carpet 
Company reports 1950 second quarter 
sales 40% ahead of the equivalent pe- 
riod in 1949. 

Mohawk, Armstrong. Pequot sheets. 
Mazda lamps, Rit tint and dyes and 
Shinola shoe polish (Best Foods) are 
just a few of the diversified products 
that will hit the airwaves this fall and 
winter. Many new names will be added 
with the pickup in department store 
air-consciousness. 

18. Business couldn't possibly be 
this good, is the best way to describe 
the situation in this category. In evi- 
dence, some 6.000.000 TV sets will be 
manufactured (and sold) during 1950. 
and Commander E. F. McDonald, Jr.. 
president of Zenith, predicts that the 
production rate during the fall quarter 
will be 600,000 units monthly. In 
March, 423,000 washing machines 
were produced, an all-time record. Ra- 
dio set demand is substantially strong- 
er than 1949, particularly in table and 
portable models. Vacuum cleaners, 
phonographs, refrigerators, dish wash- 
ers, irons — home appliances of all sorts 
are being sold hand over fist. 

The big TV set manufacturers like 
Philco, RCA, DuMont, Admiral, Ze- 
nith are putting astronomic sums into 
advertising. Spot radio is getting a 
share, though not as much as it feels il 
deserves, and so is network radio. 

You can look for increased air activ- 
ity by the home appliance field. Re- 
tailers like Dvnamic Stores are appro- 
priating in six figures, too. Deep 
freeze units, strangely missing from 
the air, may seize their golden oppor- 
tunity. All in all, you can look for ex- 
citement here. 

19. The boom in home furnishings 
and appliances grows out of the 
boom in home building. Families 

have increased in prodigious numbers 
since 1946; there was a several year 
lag in the home-building program but 
that's all over now. April and May 
both were record-breaking months for 
homes going up. According to all in- 
dications, the rest of the year will be 
as strong or stronger. 



WSRS 

CLEVELAND 

c 

.... "The Family Station" 
serving Clevelanders and 
all the local nationalities 
in the 3rd most densely 
populated metropolitan 
district in the U. S. A. ... 
covering 336 square miles. 

.... Ask Forjoe for the 
power-packed selling facts 
about the effective WSRS 
domination and local 
impact. Hooper rating up 
...WSRS cost per thousand 
lowest in town, thus the 
best buy in . . . 

CLEVELAND 

WSRS 



L^haritu bealnS 

at koine 

Let's spend our Marshall Plan 
money building this country so 
strong and financially sound 
that other nations will of their 
own volition demand republican 
forms of government rather 
than seek security through com- 
munism. 

Let's lead the world by example, not 
by bribery or force. 



16e /i*t THotk Stcituuu 




_ -» „— « 5 KW DAY 

J I KW NITE 

Olli l 0UM M,SS0ULA 



ANACONDA 
BUTTE 
250 KW 



MONTANA 

\OT OSE, BIT SEVEX MAJOR I\DUSTR1ES 



17 JULY 1950 



119 




in Dollar Value 




Represented 
FORJOE & CO., 
T. B. Baker, Jr., General Manager 






Advertising wise, the greatest impor- 
tance of the home building craze is the 
effect on furnishings and appliances. 
But there are the U.S. Steels, the Johns- 
Manvilles who use the air and others 
who might. Some material shortages 
may slow the home-building boom: 
lumber, cement, heating and radiation. 
None have reached a critical stage vet. 

20. Despite our peak in spendable 
income, all is not well in the cloth- 
ing field. Constantly rising costs 
coupled with a wool shortage are caus- 
ing distress. As in the soap field, where 
synthetic detergents are sweeping the 
field, in the clothing industry the syn- 
thetic fibres, rayons, orlon. nylon. Fi- 
bre V, are challenging the wools. 

In early summer. Textron Inc. dis- 
continued its mens wear operation 
with the explanation that constantly 
rising costs, widespread throughout the 
industry, forced its hand. 

Women's apparel, it seems, hasn't 
been well served by recent fashions. 
The demand isn't as enthusiastic as 
economic conditions warrant, although 
recent months show a marked upturn 
in sales. Fur sales have been on the 
decline, but there's some hope that in- 
dustry advertising action may mark an 
upward trend again. 

Children's shoe firms have taken to 
TV. Both International Shoe and Sun- 
dial Shoes are using network. Tom 
McAn Shoes is a hot prospect for spot 
radio this fall. 

Robert Hall will have a huskier-than- 
ever schedule this fall. Bond Clothes. 
Howard Clothes, and Trimount won't 
invest as much; but they're not over- 
looking any bets. 

21. The expectation that the ex- 
cise tax might be lifted, or halved, 
hasn't helped jewelry sales. In the 

watch field, the Swiss are giving the 
domestic firms quite a scare. Bulova 
will maintain its traditional advertis- 
ing leadership, both in radio and TV. 
sparked by its astute broadcast expert. 
Fritz Snyder. Benrus and Jacoby-Ben- 
der (watch bands) show definite inter- 
est in spot. 

Sparked by radio, lighter sales have 
risen 1.000' < in 10 years. Imports 
threaten, but butane gas lighters 
I Brown & Bigelow, Stratford Pen, etc. ) 
may save the day. Ronson. which dom- 
inates the field with $32,000,000 in 
sales during 1949, will start worrying 
next year. Its "press lighter" patent 
runs out in 19S2. 



Eversharp is most active in the razor 
field. It will continue on the air. The 
health of this field during the fourth 
quarter is linked partly to what hap- 
pens to the excise tax. partly to the 
push that manufacturers, distributors, 
and retailers put behind their luxury 
lines. 

22. Profits are expanding; busi- 
ness is exceptionally good in this 
field. One important advertising man- 
ager told sponsor that this year his 
firm is rubbing its eyes at its prosper- 
ity. 

Fire insurance placement has moved 
ahead by leaps and bounds since war's 
end. To add to the prosperity, rates 
have increased while fire losses have 
lessened, os they alwavs do in good 
times. 

This is a great year for stock bro- 
kerage firms like Merrill Lynch. Pierce. 
Fenner & Beane. Don't be surprised if 
you find a few of the more daring bro- 
kerage houses experimenting with ra- 
dio and TV this year. They have the 
money to do it during 1950; they may 
not have in 1951. 

Auto finance companies are doing 
extremely well, reflecting high auto 
sales, larger unit loans (due to higher 
prices ) . and increased auto insurance, 
including compulsory insurance in 
some states. 

In the life insurance field, firms like 
Prudential. Equitable. Metropolitan 
can be counted on to reach their 
every-home prospect via radio and TV. 
They've done especially well in recent 
years with radio. 

23. The railroads are earning more 
money this year than last. Efficiency 

has been increased with greater use of 
diesel engines; freight rates are up. 
offsetting wage increases. Southern Pa- 
cific made $12,000,000 net the first five 
months of 1950, against $6,000,000 in 
the same 1949 period. The atmosphere 
is good for air advertising, particular- 
ly since the diverse lines seem to like 
the Railroad Hour. Railroads have 
been notoriously poor air advertisers, 
but the combination of the network 
hour, radio spot possibilities, and TV 
may draw them in. There's plenty of 
scrutiny of the visual medium in rail- 
road circles. 

Airlines should have an affinity for 
the air, but haven't. With coach serv- 
ice gaining favor, and calling for larg- 
er volume of traffic, advertising will be 
intensified. But air ad-managers seem 



120 



SPONSOR 



GROWING 



GROWING 

GROWN 



MORNING PERIOD* 



PLUS... 

a 14.8 Over-all Audience 
Increase Since 1949 

ANOTHER BONUS 
FOR ADVERTISERS... 

Special merchandising 
department for extra 
promotion of sales. 

'January, February, 1950 Hooper 

11/ ADD AM 5,000 Watts 
If HDD FM 50,000 Watts 

AMERICAN BROADCASTING 

COMPANY 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
THE MOBILE PRESS REGISTER 

NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY 
THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



L 



Caroline Ellis, talented 15-year 
veteran radio personality, directs 
the KMBC-KFRM "Happy Home- 
women's commentary program. 
Gifted with a 
wonderful 
voice and a 
rich back- 
ground, Caro- 
line Ellis is one 
of the best 
known woman 
broadcasters. 
Repeated ly, 
her program 
has the highest rating of any wo- 
man's program in the Kansas City 
Primary Trade area. 

Caroline is sponsored by the 
Celanese Corporation of America, 
and has just completed a success- 
ful campaign in behalf of a re- 
gional advertiser, with seasonal 
business. 

Contact us, or any Free & Peters 
Colonel"on her two availabilities! 




Caroline Ellis 



'Available Tuesday and Thursday. 



KMBC 

of Kansas City 

KFRM 

for Rural Kansas 



to have found the printed media trail. 
and lost radio and TV in the shuffle. 
Maybe fall 1950 will change that. 
There's a wide-open opportunitj in ra- 
dio and TV for the airlines. 

I lie whole travel industry feels itself 
drawn to TV because of it> \ isual ad- 
vantages. What it does about it for the 
present is questionable. 

Southern travel v\ill lie heav) this 
fall and winter. Advertising, mainh 
newspaper, will push the idea. 

24. Books are in 3 slump. Maga- 
zines are finding the going rough, 

although new products like Quick are 
finding public favor. Both books and 
magazines have found radio an excel- 
lent antidote for a sales slump and are 
using the medium frequentl) and well. 
Magazines like Holiday, Ladies' Home 
Journal and Saturday Evening Post 
merchandise regular!) via the air. Mac- 
Fadden Publications are experts, too. 
In the book field. Doubleday. Simon & 
Schuster, and man] others have found 
radio a highh effective direct-sales me- 
dium. 

Movies are experimenting with TV. 
and so far have found in New Haven 
and Philadelphia that teaser campaigns 
on TV have a revitalizing effect on at- 
tendance. Much more activity will be 
seen as the movie industry struggles to 
emerge from its doldrums. 

25. It's turning into a buyer's mar- 
ket. Until last year the farmer couldn't 
get a new tractor without waiting a 
period of from four to six months. 
With production up and the peak post- 
war demand past, farm equipment 
manufacturers didn't do too well earl) 
this year. But sales are good this sum- 
mer. 

Willi farm income three times pre- 
war, and enormous liquid savings, the 
opportunities are there. But now the 
farmer is picking and choosing — a sit- 
uation made to order for advertising. 

Many studies have revealed the par- 
tiality that the farmer shows for radio. 
In TV areas he's gone in for viewing, 
too. But his radio loyalty doesn't wa- 
ver; he depends on it for dail\ stork 
reports, weather reports, and many 
other services, not to mention enter- 
tainment. Its a wonder that some deep 
freeze manufacturer doesn't cash in on 
his preference for the medium. 

This fall Allis-Chalmers, Internation- 
al Harvester, Keystone Steel and Wire 
may find company in their own field 
as thev beam toward the farmer. 




High Hoopers (Avg. 24. 5) 

Low Cost 

The ECONOMICAL way to 

SELL 

The Wheeling Market 

Check 

THE WALKER CO. 



Letters to recall 

in the Los Angeles Market 

when you buy time 




istening 



n 

Affiliate of the 
Liberty Broadcasting System 

In Los Angeles you hear Major 

League Ba cball first on KALI 

For data on other firsts ask 

KALI 425 E. Green St. 
Pasadena 1, California 

RYan 1-7149 SYcamore 6-5327 

Call Representative Schepp Reiner Company, 
II W. 42 Street. Now York — Bryant 9-5221 



17 JULY 1950 



121 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Fall trends 

We've been working overtime on 
factfinding for this Fall Facts Issue. 
Many of the facts and trends we un- 
covered seemed inevitable; others hit 
us with the impact of an ice-cold show- 
er on a hot day. Out of the host of 
facts we've collected for this sponsor 
and agency indoctrinating session here 
are some that stand out: 

1 1 1 There won't be any dearth of 
nighttime radio this fall. There will 
be fewer expensive nighttime network 
shows; but there will be just as much 
network time sold . . . more national 
spot sponsorship than ever before. 

I 2) The several hundred radio sta- 
tions that get the bulk of national spot 
business will find themselves with ear- 
lier morning (marginal time) nation- 
al sponsors than heretofore. Their big 



job will be to find time for all the im- 
portant advertisers who want to use 
their facilities, morning, afternoon, 
and night. 

(3) Don't worry about getting on 
NBC-TV or CBS-TV this fall. Their 
sponsorable hours are jammed practi- 
cally solid. Of course, there's always 
the chance that somebody will change 
his plans. DuMont and ABC-TV look 
like sellouts, too. 

(4) Individual stations will feature 
many more participation (multiple 
sponsor) radio programs, often on the 
advice of their national representatives. 
If your campaign calls for inclusion in 
participations, don't overlook the as- 
sistance that the individual station can 
give in integrating your commercial 
into the shows. 

(5) You may find it hard to clear 
time on network stations; remember 
that many independent stations are do- 
ing a grand job of holding and increas- 
ing nighttime as well as daytime radio 
audiences. For some assignments 
they're the best to use under any cir- 
cumstances . . . but the ones you pick 
must be carefully checked by your 
timebuyers. 

(6) If you're interested in spot TV 
this fall, your best advice is to call in 
the TV national repiesentatives and ex- 
plain your problem. 

Local opportunity for sponsors 

The recent Printers' Ink analysis of 
1949 advertising expenditures, com- 
piled by Hans Zeisel of McCann-Erick- 



son, points up an excellent advertising 
opportunity for local sponsors. 

While newspapers rang up the whop- 
ping total of $1,440,000,000 in local 
advertising, radio registered only 
8244,600.000 — or a ratio of roughlv 
6 to 1. 

As Maurice Mitchell. Director of the 
Broadcast Advertising Bureau, has 
pointed out, local and regional mer- 
chants and their advertising agencies, 
wedded to the traditional concept that 
newspapers are their staple advertising 
medium, have more often than not 
closed their eyes to the radio facilities 
in their communities. 

Yet there are nearly 2,000 standard 
(AM I radio stations and some 900 
FM stations daily pouring their pro- 
graming into close to 100% of all the 
homes in your market. The aggregate 
effect, according to a 1948 nation-wide 
survey by Fortune, is a preference for 
radio in the average U. S. home far 
ahead of the second recreational fa- 
vorite. The ARBI point-of-sale sur- 
veys of sales effectiveness, newspapers 
vs. radio (see Air Power section in this 
issue) credit radio with bringing in 
twice the traffic, nearly three times the 
dollar sales of newspapers. 

Here's our fall suggestion to local 
advertisers: competition is growing. 
You can use a fresh approach in your 
advertising. Challenge your local sta- 
tion to produce a campaign that will 
show more results per dollar than you 
are getting via other media. 



Applause 



They all pitched in 

In 1946, when the idea of a maga- 
zine named SPONSOR was being aired, 
everyone said "great!"' But there was 
always a reservation: would national 
advertisers, agencies, networks, repre- 
sentatives, and others in the field co- 
operate to provide the down-to-earth 
facts and figures in which SPONSOR 
said il would specialize? 

Today, four years later, the indus- 
li\ knows how ril'ri lively SPONSOR has 
dispelled the aura of mystery that has 
kept main an advertiser from using 
the air media. Il hasn'l always been 
easy, and we've tread on many a toe. 
But no longer is broadcast advertising 
the great unknown. \ol onh sponsor. 
lull other advertising trade publica- 



tions, are profiting by the increasing 
willingness of advertisers to tell what 
they're doing, why, and to what effect. 

In our opinion, this Fall Facts Is- 
sue is the crowning example to date of 
the growing tendency to share infor- 
mation about broadcast advertising. 
The wealth of guidance contained in 
this issue is by courtesy of a host of 
national advertisers, key agency exec- 
utives, national station representatives, 
transcription firms, TV services, sta- 
tion managers. They gave freely 
(sometimes against their self-interests) 
to sponsor's 10 reporters whose job it 
was to gather, evaluate, and interpret. 
If you profit by the issue, you can 
credit the "exchange-of-information 
concept." 

We can't name all who generously 



contributed to this buyers' briefing 
project; but wed be remiss if we 
didn't list the following: Tom Flana- 
gan, Jerry Bess, H. Preston Peters, 
George Abrams, Maurice Mitchell. Bill 
Ryan. Henry Clochessy, John Blair. 
Mike Dann. R. D. Partridge, Tom Sla- 
ter, Jack Van Volkenburg. Joe Weed, 
Linnea Nelson, Gerald Lyons. Ade 
Hull. Joe Bloom, Ed Madden. Bob Kel- 
ler. Duke Rorabaugh, Art Nielsen. 
Louis Engel. Ed Grunwald, Ted Ober- 
felder, Paul Raymer, Fred Ziv, Cy 
Langlois, Ted Cott. Jake Evans, Dan 
Denenholz, Harry Feeney, Les Biebl. 
Frank Zuzulo. Hans Zeisel, Carl Burk- 
land, Art Donegan, Bert Schwartz, 
Robert McFadyen, Lance Ballon. Har- 
per Carraine, Ed Reeve, Jose di Do- 
nato. 



122 



SPONSOR 





nd compan 




RADIO AND TELEVISION STATION REPRESENTATIVES 





*!.».„ lil? ""'<* '36,570 

V /o more fa^sr . 



BMB 
Station Audience 
Report 
Spring 1949 






Industrial Capital 
of New England 



31 JULY 1950 • $8.00 a Year 




0k 

•^ TEl 



TELEVISION IN THE WHAS TRADITION 



"WHAS-TV News 



WHAS-TV offers the top news show in Louisville, 
featuring the city's first and only TV newsreel. 
Each day WHAS-TV cameramen cover the top 
news stories in the Louisville area, and the films 
they take are processed for showing the same night. 
The result is lively and timely local coverage 
. . . "Today's News Today". 

In addition to local film highlights and guest 
appearances, a complete local, national and 
international round-up is presented by WHAS 
News Director Dick Oberlin and Pete French, 
Kentuckiana's two best known newscasters. 




// 



The show is the work of the same outstanding 
news staff (now expanded) that in 1949 was voted 
the best newsroom in broadcasting by the 
National Association of Radio News Directors. 



News Director 
DICK OBERLIN 




Newscosfer 1 "^ 

PETE FRENCH 



A Basic CBS Affiliate . . . 

and the Cable is coming in October 



WHAS-TV 



VICTOR A. SHOLIS, Director 



NEIL D. CLINE, Sates Director 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY AND CO. 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE COURIER-JOURNAL & LOUISVILLE TIMES 



M 






,B: 



TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS.. , 





..SPONSOR REPORT 



20,000 weekly 

BBD&O spot 

placements 

sets record 



Battle looms for 
soluble coffee sales 



31 July, 1950 

How much is Radio's true worth, subject of much puzzle m ent by advertisers, is not 
radio worth? 100% assessable at prese nt. Big obstacles are lack of concrete infor- 
mation on long-range TV influence on listening, lack of common denomi- 
nator in weighing radio and TV worth in relation to black and white 
media. In this issue (see page 24) SPONSOR suggests a yardstick for 
basic comparison — the number of minutes each gets of an individual's 
time. 

-SR- 

In a compilation for SPONSOR, BBD&O (largest spot radio agency) esti- 
mates that its we e kly spot rad io pla cements, counting each announce- 
ment or program as one unit, comes close to 20,000 for nearly 50 
clients. In TV, the figure runs 500 weekly units for 35 clients. 

-SR- 

Prominent on the air this fall w il 1 be Minute Maid and Snow Crop solu- 
ble coffees, both racing for natio n al distribution and consumer pref- 
erence, both sho w ing a partiality t o TV. But fast increase in mar- 
kets may bring radio into picture. Soluble coffee has economy edge 
over vacuum-packed variety. Whole field of juice and beverage concen- 
trates will be hopping this fall. 

-SR- 

Radio may be b ig gainer from trend t oward suburb a n shopping and erec- 
tion of branc h department stores. In one city where department 
stores are strictly anti-radio, suburban branch of top store may be 
forced into medium because another outlying store uses air strongly. 
1950 census reveals that throughout U.S. big population expansion is 
in suburban areas while big cities lag. 

-SR- 

Canadian b r oadcasters don't expect any TV in t h e Domin io n until 1952, 
when stations should be on t h e air in Toronto and Montreal . But such 
cities as Winnepeg, Vancouver, Edmonton aren't expected to be TV mar- 
kets until 1955 or later. Situation between government-owned CBC, 
which wants to control TV as it does radio, and private broadcasters 
hasn't speeded the medium. 

-SR- 

FM going up Do n't wr it e off FM as a medium yet. Besides transit radio and store- 
in Iowa casting, it's showing vitality elsewhere. For example, WHO study of 

Iowa listening, just completed, shows 2% of Iowa homes with FM sets in 
1948; 7.7% in 1948; 13.4% in 1950. Zenith reports that FM production, 
since February, is ahead of corresponding months last year. And in 
Washington there's Congressional agitation to do something to stimu- 
late the medium. 



Trend to suburban 

stores brings 

new ad strategy 



TV in Canada 
by 1952 — maybe 



SPONSOR, Volume I. No. Hi. 31 July 1950. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc., at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore 11. Md. Executive, Editorial. Circulation Office 
•"'10 Madison Ave.. New York 22. $8 a year in I'. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postoffice under Act 8 March 1879. 



REPORTS. ;. SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR R 



TV stimulates 

music, furniture 

sales 



Advertising should 
be upped — Gamble 



88% of listening- 
viewing hours go 
to radio: Nielsen 



Radio-TV will 

get more of 

department store 

ad dollar 



TV station 

makes newsreel 

in Korea 



Denver station 

tells citizenry 

why no television 



Standard TV rate 
card nearly ready 



Lanham Trade- 
Mark Act protects 
radio and TV 
service marks 



In wake of furniture manufacturers, who report that parlor furn i ture 
is booming with advent of TV set, music merchants claim that TV has 
upped music instrument sales at least 10%. 1950 sales are expected 
to hit close to $250,000,000. 

-SR- 

Despite record $5 billion invested in advertising in 1949 Fred Gamble , 
h ead of AAAA, is urging bigger bud g ets. Increase in advertising 
isn't keeping pace with expanding national income and sales potential. 
Radio gain in 1949 over 1948 was about 3%. 

-SR- 

Nielsen reports that although television is the rage of many markets, 
nationally radio still commands 88% of all listening-viewing hours. 
Radio homes total 40,700,000 against some 6,500,000 TV homes. In 
April 1950 combined radio and TV usage in the average radio home 
totalled four hours, 47 minutes daily. 

-SR- 

Impact of NRDGA education plus outs t anding radio and TV results some 
department stores are gaining should greatly accelerate department 
store use of air this fall. In 1949 average department store invested 
540 of every dollar in newspaper space, 30 in radio. Only 18% of spe- 
cialty stores used radio during year. 

-SR- 

KTTV, Los Angeles, believes TV is big business; demonstrates by rush- 
ing own newsreel specialist to Korea. Film will be made available to 
other stations under syndicated plan recently unveiled by station. 

-SR- 

KLZ, Denver (in one of larger markets minus single TV outlet), has 
taken to air to explain why city has no TV. KLZ experts are now on 
FCC freeze. Station manager Hugh B. Terry and department heads take 
listeners behind the scenes each Saturday with "Let's talk it over" 
series. 

-SR- 

Advertisers, agency executives, and NAB officials have been quietly 
meeting on subject of standardized TV rate card and are now at virtual 
agreement. Last big stumbling block was over property responsibility, 
a big item when anything from a valuable string of pearls to a Chevro- 
let truck may be sent to studio for televising purposes . . . and are 
sometimes injured, strayed, or stolen. Standardized rate card, ap- 
proved by NAB Board, will be a valuable assist to TV buyers. 

-SR- 

Sponsors, stations, TV film producers are becoming increasingly inter- 
ested in applicability of Lanham Trade-Mark Act to their protection of 
program titles , station call letters, characters, slogans, and unique 
sounds. To be applicable for registration a trade mark "must not be 
entirely incidental to the advertising or sale of merchandise. ' Harry 
P. Warner, Washington radio/TV attorney, has written full article on 
subject in April 1950 issue of Southern California Law Review. 



SPONSOR 



«t 



Bubbles like ginger ale, 

don't it, mirandey? 



## 




W 



INE, women and song! With Effec- 
tive Buying Income 38.2% higher than the 
national average, our "landed gentry" can 
certainly afford the gay life! 

What's more they've got plenty left over 
for soup and soap, housewares and hair 
tonic. That's where WDAY comes in, be- 
cause no station in the Northwest can match 
WDAY for both rural and urban coverage! 

A new 22-county North Dakota Agricultural 



Survey proves that WDAY is preferred by 
78.8% of the farmers in these 22 counties 
. . . Station "B" by only 4.4%! 

Hoopers prove that WDAY is an over- 
whelming favorite in Fargo. For Total 
Rated Periods, Dec. '49-Apr. '50, for ex- 
ample, WDAY got a 63.5% Share of Audi- 
ence — the next station 16.0%! 

Write to us or ask Free & Peters for all 
the amazing facts! 




FARGO, N. D. 




NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 

FREE & PETERS, INC., Exclusive National Representatives 



31 JULY 1950 




Vol. 4 no. 16 



31 July 1950 



Sponsor Reports 


1 


510 Madison 


o 


Outlook 


8 


Queries 


10 


Hr. Sponsor: 
John 1. Ho one 


12 


\ew and Renew 


13 


P. S. 


m 


Radio Results 


34 


yir. Sponsor Asks 


38 


Roundup 


40 


Sponsor Speaks 


50 


Applause 


50 



Coi*<?I* shows scene which is becoming in- 
creasingly familiar on TV. Phone shows 
are ringing up sales for sponsors on the 
visual medium just as they do on AM 
radio. (See story page 26.) 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Frank M. Bannister, Irving 
Marder 

Assistant Editors: Erik H. Arctander, Fred Birn- 
baum, Arnold Alpert, Lila Lederman 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President — Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(West Coast Manager), George Weiss 
(Southern Representative), Beatrice Turner, 
Edna Yergin, John Kovchok 

Vice-President — Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Promotion Manager: M. H. LeBlang 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 
INC. Executive. Editorial, Circulation, and Advertising 
Offices: 510 Madison Ave.. New York 22, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 360 N. 
Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Financial 1556. West 
Coast Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles. 
Telephone: Hillside 8311. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave, Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: United States 
$8 a year, Canada and foreign $9. Single copies 50c. 
Printed In U. S. A. Address all correspondence to 510 
Madison Avenue. New Yt.rk 22. N. Y. Copyright 1950. 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



■v 




ARTICLES 



How to sell on Satttrday niyht 

Barn dance programs with their fun, frolic and friendly appeal are rounding 
up larger audiences than ever, still delighting sponsors with their sales punch 



)lilk-Rone's task foree 

For local trouble-shooting, Nabisco's dog biscuit product chooses radio to 

point up its other advertising efforts £** 



Let's put all media under the same ntivroseope 

All media compete for time. Based on this, SPONSOR suggests a technique 

for common-denominator measurement of radio, TV, magazines, newpapers £4 



l%early every station has one: Part 11 

Telephone gimmick shows are a ringing success on TV as well as on the radio, 
guarantee high interest, low cost audiences to sponsors Sn 



What media team up best with TV? 

Sponsors puzzled as to which media to drop, which to keep, in a TV market 

may be aided by CBS circulation studies on othe; media vs. TV 30 



Furs on the air 

Resultful use of broadcast media is being made by a few ad-wise retailers, 

though most suffer from lack of national push, inept promotion, excise tax »S7m 



IN FUTURE ISSUES 



W hat ad-men would tell sponsors — if they dared 

What should advertisers know about the radio and TV department of an 
agency? SPONSOR has asked ad-men that question, comes up with provoca- 
tive answers 



Hon- children in|/ii«'iii-«' I \ riewiny 

An Ohio State University study shows that children exert a tremendous influ- 
ence on the ratings of adult television programs 



Neyro ilisk jockeys 

They are spearheading the drive into the Negro markets, where an unde 
veloped sales potential exists for advertisers 



.sioiioii iiM'i-c/Miiufisino lor advertisers 

What does an advertiser expect in the way of station promotion on the 
retail level, and what are stations willing to give them? SPONSOR finds 
the answers varied and heated 



14 Auy. 



14 Any. 



14 Auy. 



14 Auy. 



- 



it's easy, 



WHEN YOU 
KNOW HOW! 



G, 



ETTING a BMB Daytime Weekly Audience of 
aver 300,000 families is not exceptional for a 50,000- 
ivatt station. But getting almost two-thirds of these 
weekly families as daily listeners is proof of outstanding 
Know-How! 

BMB Study No. 2 reveals that 303,230 families tune 
to KWKH at least once a week in the daytime. 64% 
of them listen "6 or 7 days weekly," and over 75% are 
'average daily listeners*". 

Shreveport Hoopers give further proof of KWKH's 
ability to attract and hold listeners. Throughout 1949 
KWKH got far and away the largest Share of Audience 
Morning, Afternoon and Evening — and this holds 
true for 1950 Hoopers, too! 

Get all the facts about KWKH and the job it can do 
for you in our three-state area. Write direct, or ask The 
Branham Company! 




KWKH DAYTIME BMB COUNTIES 



Study No. 2 



Spring, 1949 



* Weighted in BMB-approved manner. 



50,000 Watts 



KWKH 



SHREVEP0RT1 LOUISIANA 



CBS 



The Branham Company 
Representatives 

Henry Clay, General Manager 



Arkansas 




how 

hard 

can 




Sponsors love receiving letters — especially 

when they tome at the rate of one every 
7.5 seconds ! 

That's just what happened as a result of a 
certain show'' on CKAC during the week of 
May 13-19. In seven short days, this show 
pulled 78,71 S replies, each containing proof 
of purchase. Mathematically speaking, this 
means one reply each and every 7.5 seconds, 
twenty-four hours a day, for the full 
day week ! 

Amazing? Not when you consider that 
CKAC takes you into 450,000 French radio 
homes — more than 70% of the total num- 
ber of radio homes in the Province. It's no 
wonder that CKAC gets results — at a very- 
modest cost per listener. 

*CKAC's "CASINO". Present co-sponsors: 
Odex, Super Suds, Noxzcma. Segments of 
"Casino" still available for sponsorship. 
Write for full details. 

CBS Outlet in Montreal 

Key Station of the 

A TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CKAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives: 

Adam J. Young Jr. - New York, Chicago 

William Wright - Toronto 



510 Madison 



WYTHE OR WITHOUT? 

After seeing the face of Wythe 
Walker in sponsor this week I cannot 
help but wonder who he is. 

However, last night while reading 
Mother Goose rhymes to my young 
son I ran across two of her rhymes 
which 1 think, slightly revised, are ap- 
plication to this situation. Here they 
are: 

There was a man. as I've heard tell. 
\\ ho called on agencies with time to 

sell: 
He met Norm Knight on a sunny day. 
And sent his picture up sponsor waj ! 

Then came a printer, a scurrilous lout. 
Who turned his features all round 

about! 
Who put a mustache on his open phiz. 
Until his face no longer was his! 

And when this man his face did spv 
He began to shiver and then to sigh; 
He began to wonder and began to cry. 
Oh ! deary, deary me, this is none of I ! 

But if it be I. and I can't agree, 

I've a dog at home, and he'll know 

me! 
If it be I. hell wag his tail. 
And if it be not I. hell loudly wail: 

Home went the man. all in the dark. 
Up got the dog and began to bark: 
He began to bark, and the man did 

sigh. 
"Lack a mercy on me. tis none of I!" 

I do not like thee Norman Glenn : 
The reason why I do not ken. 
But this I know, and this I ken, 
1 do not like thee, Norman Glenn! 
Wythf. Walker 
The Walker Co. 
New York 



• SPONSOR'S mistake was 
We're sorry it happened l< 
Walker. 



[uite a corker, 
our pal Wvthc 



HOPALONG ON WNBT 

In your excellent issue of 19 June, 
you have a very interesting story en- 
titled "How to use TV films effec- 
tively." The story is built around a 
series of photographs of one station's 
treatment of a Hopalon» Gassid\ film 
and how the film is edited to make 
room for commercials, station break-. 
etc. 

The technique that is shown in your 
photographs was a technique devel- 
oped l>\ \\ M!'l when flopalong Cas- 



sidy was sold in New York to a local 
sponsor. The illustrations are delight- 
ful and are some of the best that we 
have in our WNBT files. However, in 
the story there is no reference what- 
soever to the fact that the illustrations 
were the work of WNBT and that the 
sponsor so vividly portrayed in the 
third picture of the series is the spon- 
sor who carries "Hoppy" in our New 
York market. 

Schuyler G. Chapin 

Director of Publicity 

WNBT 

New York 

• SPONSOR regrets the omission, agrees "with 
Reader Chapin on the blood and guts heautv of 
the WNBT pictures. 



BASEBALL ON KATL, KLEE 

In your 22 May issue of sponsor, 
under the column titled "Briefly" you 
mention that KTHT of this city be- 
comes the first station in Texas League 
history to broadcast Buff baseball di- 
rect from field of play. 

Obviously you have been misin- 
formed, since KATL and KLEE are 
also broadcasting all Buff games direct 
and KATL has always during previous 
seasons made a number of direct Buff 
pickups. 

Incidentally, KTHT is not even car- 
rying the complete Buff series since 
they eliminate Sundays from their 
schedule. 

You probably don't know, but 
KATL was Houston's original full sea- 
son baseball station — now on our 
fourth season of coverage. We are the 
only Houston station carrying a 
seven-day schedule of both Texas 
League and major league games. 

King H. Robinson 
General Manager 
KATL 
Houston 



OUTLOOK ON TEA 

In your 5 June issue you included 
an item headed "Tea drinking in- 
creases as coffee prices rise." 

Since we are handling the Tea Coun- 
cil campaign, we are always interested 
in published data regarding Tea as a 
product, and would therefore be most 
interested in hearing from you as to 
the source of the material contained in 
the article mentioned. 

George A. Rink 
Leo Burnett Co. 
Chicago 

• This information was gathered from Wall 
Stn-i'l Juurtlill ei onoinists. 



SPONSOR 



in the rich West Virginia market • • • 



it's "personality" that counts! 





* 




t he famous Personality Stations ® 

deliver the BETTER HALF! *& 



BMB has proved it! The "Personality Stations" 
are first in the rich, densely-populated area where 
West Virginians spend the better half of their dollar. Further- 
more, it's such an easy task to capture your share . . 
one advertising order, one bill and presto— you 

earn a smackingly low combination rate that makes 
the three "Personality Stations" the one 
really outstanding buy in the field. 

®»Jv* 50.65% of total population 

52.38% of retail sales 

56.94% of general merchandise sales 



ryppfi 



represented nationally by WEED & CO. 



31 JULY 1950 



Forecasts of things to come, as 
seen by sponsors editors 



Outlook 



1950 radio set production 32% 
higher than preceding year 

Home, portable, and auto radio production in the first 
four months of 1950 is 32% ahead of the 1949 figure. 
This April, 882,706 sets were made as compared to 506,469 
in April, 1949— an increase of 376,237. Portable set sales 
promotion during the coming summer months should keep 
sales and production figures at a continuing healthy level. 

Tobacco industry competition increases 

as cigarettes, pipe tobacco, cigars vie for favor 

Cigarette smoking is now at about 355,000,000,000 units a 
year, up 3,000,000,000 from 1949. Pipe smoking is up 
8%, with pipe tobacco consumption 45% higher than it 
was during 1935-1939. The major cigarette companies 
will rely on big names like Godfrey, Como, Hope, and 
Benny to keep cigarette sales at a high level. Pipe smokers 
are being lured by Martin Kane — Private Eye (Model, Old 
Briar. Dill's Best, and Tweed on NBC-TV) ; Grand Ole 
Opry (Prince Albert, NBC); Sports For All (Mail Pouch 
Tobacco, MBS). The cigar makers appeal to their audi- 
ence through newscasts and sports (Vandeventer & The 
News, WOR; Yankee baseball, WINS) ; and through na- 
tional spot campaigns. 

Beer drinking at home is trend 
attributed to TV 

With the growth of TV, there is a trend toward more beer 
drinking at homes and less in public drinking places, ac- 
cording to R. J. Cheatwood. president of the National Beer 
Wholesalers' Association. This may precipitate a shift in 
merchandising and advertising, with heavy radio and TV 
advertisers like Pabst. Schlitz, Ballantine, and Blatz em- 
phasizing the carry-home carton and no-deposit containers. 



Concentrated milk is latest 
in the frozen food field 

Frozen and concentrated milk is slated for sales tests later 
this year. If the success of hi-V, Snow Crop, and Minute 
Maid frozen fruit juices is any indication, frozen milk will 
find a ready market. Beatrice Foods Company researchers 
and other laboratories have been experimenting with quick- 
freezing concentrated milk for a year. Major drawback: 
the frozen product tends to have a slightly curdled appear- 
ance when it is made soluble. C. H. Haskell, president of 
Beatrice Foods, says the product should find its best mar- 
ket in states like Florida where milk sells for 25c to 30c 
a quart. When the product is ready, the success of spot 
radio for dairy firms points to use of that medium. 

Airlines, railroads take to the air 
to compete for passengers 

The airlines, both scheduled and non-scheduled, have had 
an exceptionally busy month. One airline executive attrib- 
utes airline increases in the Chicago area to the rail strike 
in May. With travel increasing in the summer months, the 
airlines and railroads will fight it out for passengers 
through radio, TV, and other media. For example. T.W.A. 
and New York Central are both using broadcast advertis- 
ing to gain passenger favor. T.W.A. is using spot radio 
and TV in New York. Chicago, and Los Angeles as well as 
some programing. The New York Central runs a spot 
radio campaign and non-scheduled airlines have also found 
spot advantageous. 

Video will be tested 

as medium for motion picture promotion 

The movie makers have long relied on newspaper linage 
to bring the customers into the nation's theatres. Then, 
for some time, companies like 20th Century Fox, Para- 
mount, and Warner Brothers used spot radio to spur lag- 
ging attendance. Now TV, supposedly the movie "menace," 
will be added to Hollywood's promotion artillery. Colum- 
bia Pictures will use seven Los Angeles TV stations in a 
test against all other media in San Francisco. The cam- 
paign, costing around $14,000, Avill feature coming attrac- 
tions of upcoming films designed to get the video viewer 
out of the house and into the movies. Success of the test 
will mean a sizable motion picture appropriation to TV. 



Mechanical dishwasher potential 
second only to television 

Approximately 5()( ).()()() mechanical dishwashers have been 
installed in homes in the last three years. And, says C. K. 
Reynolds, Jr., product sales manager of Apex Electric 
Manufacturing Company (Cleveland), "Our market po- 
tential is second only to television." He believes the in- 
dustry will sell 300,000 dishwashers in 1950. With Hot- 
point, General Electric, Westinghouse, Thor, and Apex in 
hot competition, broadcast advertising probably will be 
used. Less than 3% of more than 37,000,000 electricall) - 
wired homes have switched to mechanical dishwashing. 
This compares with such "saturation" figures as 73% for 
clotheswashers; 80% for refrigerators; 18% for electric 
stoves; 13% for irons. 



1950 looms as record year 

for automobile production and sales 

Auto production is expected to total 6,000,000 passenger 
cars and a million trucks in 1950 — a 13% increase over 
last year. Production is matched by heavy demand brought 
about by an increase in family income, family spending, 
and a strong replacement demand caused by the 16.000.- 
000 pre-war cars siill in operation. Because of this bright 
sales picture, major auto makers are expanding their use 
of broadcast advertising. For example: the Ford Com- 
pany is now plugging "two Fords to a family," showing 
the advantages ot owning two low-priced automobiles as 
compared to ownership of one expensive model. Oldsmo- 
bile (General Motors) is scheduling a weekly series of 18 
radio and 10 video announcements this fall. 



S 



SPONSOR 



The Largest Listener Mail 
In WLS History 



THE WLS MARKET ,, wor th y of 

your consideration. 16,922,600 people in 
this WLS coverage area spent $15,692,- 
981,000 on retail sales last year out of their 
effective buying income of $24,209,370,000. 
These people can best be reached by radio 
— most effectively and economically so by 
WLS. 



In the face of constant stories that AM radio 
is losing audience and that public interest is 
turning elsewhere, WLS listener mail in the 
first six months of 1950 was the largest of 
any like period in the station's history. 

WLS has always proved its audience and 
the responsiveness of that audience by letters 
from listeners. For twenty years we have 
been proud of the fact that more than a mil- 
lion listeners wrote the station each year. 
This year only slightly less than a million 
letters were received in the first six months! 
This mail increase was not prompted by 
any extraordinary incentives. Only usual 
program offers were used. Certainly it is 
proof that the WLS audience is not being 
led away; that it listens — and responds. 

For case histories on how this responsive- 
ness has produced sales for WLS advertisers, 
write WLS, CHICAGO 7, or call any John 
Blair man. 



CLEAR CHANNEL Hone of the NATIONAL Barn D 



890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, ABC NETWORK-REPRESENTED BY \ JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 




31 JULY 1950 




Queries 



Jhis new feature will present some of the most inter- 
esting questions asked of SPONSOR'S Research Dept. 
Readers are invited to call or write for information. 
Address: BIO Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 



by all four 
major networks 







■ ami 



FREE a~d PETERS Not? Ttyn&entaAArCt 



Q. inn you give us the number of Spanish speaking listeners 
reached by stations WWRL, WLIB, and WHOM in the New York 
area • Soap manufacturer, New York 

A. There are approximately 40,000 listeners in the metropolitan area, 
but the stations have made no surveys showing how these break 
down in number. WWRL broadcasts Spanish programs about 35 
hours each week; WHOM between 15 and 18 hours. Write the 
Foreign Language Quality Network, 70 East 45th Street. NYC; 
perhaps they can give you more detailed information. 

||. Can you tell me which station has Break the Bank and when? 

Advertising agency, New York 
A. NBC, 9:00 p.m. Wednesday; NBC-TV, 10:00 p.m. Wednesday. 

Q. We have a client who is in the bridal gown business interested in 
testing television. Have you information that would be helpful? 

Advertising agency, Pittsburgh 

A. Our 199 TV Results shows department store and specialty store 

results; see pages 16. 17 and 37. (199 TV Results are available 

free to sponsor subscribers; otherwise $1.00 per copy. Bulk 

rates given on request.) 

|1. Have you had an edition which contained television cos! charts? 

Radio and TV packager, Chicago 
A. The 22 May issue, beginning on page 25, has an article "Tele- 
vision program costs;" included are illustrations of various type 
programs and costs breakdown. 

Q. Who sponsors Boston Blackie in New York? They are offering 
a premium and we'd like to know about it, as we understand that 
it is a genuine cameo brooch given for 35 cents. 

Jewelry company, New York 
A. Conte Castile Shampoo sponsors Boston Blackie on WOR, New 
York. The company advertises: "Send a top of a Conte Shampoo 
box and 35 cents to Box 361 , Brooklyn, N. Y." 

O. Do you have any information on pioneer sponsors in daytime 
radio? Advertising agency, New York 

A. Our 1946 issues carried the "20-Year Club" series; these should 
be of some help. Perhaps some of the oldest radio stations can 
he of more help; check: KDKA, Pittsburgh: WGY, Schenectady; 
WOR, New York; WWJ. Detroit; WTIC, Hartford; WOWO, Fori 
Wayne; WKY, Oklahoma City. 

Q. Have you ever had a story on the Lucky Social Security Numbers 

Advertising agency, Baltimore 
A. Not a story, but we had mention of it in our "Roundup"' depart- 
ment. See our 19 June 1950 issue, page 38. 

Q. Can you supply us with the names and addresses of the first 50 
leading television manufacturers in the country? 

Advertising agency, Philadelphia 
A. Contact the Television Digest and FM Reports, 1519 Connecticut 
Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. They have available a list of ap- 
proximately 90 names. 

SPONSOR 



D-X likes D-Xtras they get from willie wish 





Pardon our pun, but it 

has an important point. 

The Mid-Continent Petroleum Corporation. 

producers of that powerful D-X gasoline, 

have recently started their third year 

of sponsoring the "Breakfast Club News." 

They like the extra sales they have received 

from this six times a week newscast 

— the reason for our pun. 

You can see now why Willie is so proud. 

As he puts it — "If you WISH results in Indianapolis, 

select a powerful puller — 

that's me, Willie WISH." 



that powerful puller in Indianapolis . . . 





wjsh 



OF INDIANAPOLIS 

affiliated with AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY 

GEORGE J. HIGGINS, General Manaaer 
FREE & PETERS, National Representatives 



31 JULY 1950 



11 



?IAYBAU/ 



PHILLIES 
and 
ATHLETICS 
Games on 




WDEL-TV 

CHANNEL 7 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

WGAL-TV 

CHANNEL 4 

LANCASTER, PENNA. 



All Saturday home games of 
these two teams are telecast 
over these two stations. This 
baseball feature is important 
because of its strong appeal in 
these markets. Because it is 
only one of many popular fea- 
tures, the result of effective 
long-range programming. These 
stations are keeping their audi- 
ences growing, loyal and respon- 
sive. They offer TV advertisers 
a fine opportunity for market 
testing for profitable business. 



WDEL-TV, Wilmington, Del. 

Only TV station in Delaware. Brings 
viewers a clear picture, all top 
NBC Network shows. 
WGAL-TV, Lancaster, Penna. 
Only TV station in this rich Pennsyl- 
vania section. Presents top shows of 
NBC, CBS, ABC, DuMont. 

Clair R. McColiough, 

General Manager 

STEINMAN STATIONS 

Represented by 

ROBERT MEEKER 

ASSOCIATES 

New York Chicago 

San Francisco Los Angeles 



NBC 

TV •Affiliates 




3Ir. Sponsor 



John f . Moone 

President 
Snow Crop Marketers, Inc., N. Y. 



Jack (John I.) Moone, president of Snow Crop Marketers. Inc.. 
strives for impact when it comes to advertising and selling. 

"Our expenditures for advertising are not based on past sales," 
says this husky, hustling 38-year-old executive, "but are made in 
anticipation of expected sales." His manner is casual and confident. 
"We don't project our advertising thoughts in advance of six weeks. 
If we run across something good, we hit it with all the impact within 
our means. Right now that goes for television." 

Snow Crop spent $60,000 in 1949 for radio spot announcements. 
Last April they tried five weeks of television, featuring Sid Caesar on 
Your Show of Shows. The company used the program to launch its 
new frozen coffee concentrate. Four weeks later the product had 
reached a 68% retail distribution in the markets covered. Jack 
Moone was sold. 

Now, a 60% chunk of the $2,000,000 ad budget will be devoted to 
TV. Plans call for Sid Caesar's NBC show (34 cities) to begin in 
the fall at a cost of $25,000 per week. The company currently spon- 
sors Faye Emerson in Fifteen With Faye, a 15-minute TV program 
(NBC) ; and co-sponsors the 15-minute TV Susan Adams Kitchen 
(DuMont). In addition, Snow Crop recently began to telecast about 
25 announcements per week in the Los Angeles area over KFI-TV. 

Jack Moone learned the meaning of impact in his earlier days as a 
salesman. Born in Chicago, he attended Georgetown University and 
later became a salesman for Armour and Co. In 1937, again as a 
salesman, he went to work for Birds Eye; did well, but left them in 
1945 to organize his own company, Snow Crop. In 1946, Clinton 
Foods, Inc. bought out the majority interest in Snow Crop; Jack 
was retained as top executive. 

Jack brought the company from scratch in 1946 to rank today as 
number one among producers of frozen orange juice concentrates. 
The company is second only to Birds Eye in the entire frozen food 
field. Sales in 1946 were $3,200,000; last year, $26,000,000 (profit: 
$1,300,000). They expect to top $40,000,000 for the current year. 

For Jack Moone social life and recreation are at least temporarily 
limited. The company is growing by leaps and bounds, constantly 
keeping him on the move. His is a hot pace in a cold industry. 



12 



SPONSOR 



iVc*f#; and #• 



31 July lf>r,0 




These reports appear in alternate issues 



New on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 

Botany Mills Inc 
Brown Shoe Co 

Derby Foods Inc (sub- 
sidiary of Swift & Co.) 

Miles Laboratories 

Norwich Phnrmacal Co 

Pabst Sales Co 

RCA 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Co 

Wilson Sporting Goods 
Co & 

General Mills Inc 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



Alfred J. Silberstein- 4BC 65 

Bert Goldsmith Inc 

Leo Burnett iNBC 162 

Nccdhaiii. Louis X Brorb) MBS loo 

Wade MIC 160 

Benton & Bowles MtC 181 

Warwick & Legler NBC 156 

J. Walter Thompson NBC 156 

William E-ty NBC 166 

Ewell & II,,,,.., VBC 233 

Knox Reeves MBS 500 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

The Botany Song Shop: Sun 10:15-10 :30 pm| .".2 wk- 

Suiiliii" Ed McConnell & His Buster Brown Gang; ^at ll:30-noon| 

12 Vim; r,2 wkv 
Sky King; T, Th 5:30-5:5.-, piu : l> Sep | ">2 >.k. 

Quiz hi.l-; Sun 3-4 pm; 10 Sep; 52 wks 

Modern Romances; T. Th 11:15-11:30 am; 8 Auk; 52 wks 
Blue Ribbon Sport of Kings; Sit 5-5:30 pm : II Jul: I.I wks 
Life of Riley; F 10-10:30 pm : 6 Oct; 52 wk- 

lake It Or Leave It: Sun 10-10:30 pm; 10 Sepi 52 wks 

The 1 at Man; F 8-8:30 pm ; 6 Oct; 52 wks 

Ill-Star Football Game: F 9:30 pm m conclusion; 11 Aug onl) 



Renewals on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


NET 


STA 


TIO 


Finer? on Drug; Co 
General Foods Corp 
Hall Brothers 
Liggett & Myers Toliacr 

Co 
Sterling Drug Inc 


BBD&O 

Young <X Ruble am 
Foote, Cone & Belding 
o Cunningham & Walsh 




CHS 

(Its 

CBS 

< lis 


158 
150 
159 

182 


Dancer-F it zgerald-S ample 




CBS 

CBS 


151 
151 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Hollywood Star Theatre: M 8-8:30 pm; 2» Jul; 52 uk. 
Gang llu-ter-.; Sal 9-9:30 pm; 2(. tog ; -.2 «k. 
Hallmark Playhouse; Th 10-10:30 pm; 7 Sep; 52 wks 
l!iii« Crosby; W ":3O-10 pm; 20 Sep; 52 wk~ 

Mystery Theatre: T 8-8:30 pm; 1 In:; 52 wk- 

Mr. Chameleon: W 8.8:3(1 pm; 2 lug] 52 wks 



New National Spot Radio Business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



American Cyanamid Co Tobacco weed killer 

American Cyanamid Co Cotton defoliant 

Columbia Breweries Inc Iteei 

General Foods Corp La France 

F. Schumacher & Co Fabrics 

The National Cigar En- Cigar nianufacturer- 
joyment Parade Inc and distributors 



AGENCY 

Hazard (N. V.) 

Hazard <N. Y.) 

How J. Ryan & Son 
(Seattle) 

> oung & II ,,l,i, in , 

(N. Y.) 
Lawrence Boles Hick. 

(N. Y.) 
Wesley <N. Y.) 



STATIONS-MARKETS CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



10 sins; South 

21 etna; South 

Kl AH, Fairbanks, 
KEINT, Anchorage 

30 stns ; scattered mkts 

16 stns; 16 nikis 

32 stns; 32 mkts 



A nnc mts ; staggered starting dates 

from 2 1 Jul; 1<> wks two days 
Annemts : staggered starting dates 

from 17 Jul; 8 wks 
The Heidelberg Harmonaires ; three 

I '.■hum prog a wk; 17 July; 13 

*k- 
Annemts on partie prog ; 3 Aug ; -1 

wks 
Fart ie; early Sep; 8 wks 

Onr-iiiiii annemts and partie in early 
morning broadcasts; lii wk In 
tug to last wk in Sep 



National Broadcast Sales Executives 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



No 



D. Brown 



Edward J. Devney 
Henry L. Douglas 
Mrs. Ann Evans 
Ceorge W. Faust 
Cliff Ferdon 
Victor E. Forker 
John F. Hardest y 



National Broadcast Sale-, acet exec 

William G. Rambeau Co, >*. Y., vp 

WLW'T, Cincinnati, set-up depl 

WPAY, Portsmouth, <). 

DuMont Television, N. Y., asst tfe mgr 

Ceneral Motors Corp, Detroit 

WPIX, N. Y„ prog prom 

WOIC-TV, Wash, dir of spec events 



Kadlo Times Sales, Ontario, pres, mgr (new radio sin rep agenCT, 

147 University Ave., Toronto ) 
Devney & Co (new station represent at i\ e firm) 3 17 Madison Ave 
Same, prod staff member 

W ICNS, WFCD-FM, Columbus, prog prom dir 
Same, tfe nigr 

WKRCAM-TV. WCIIS-FM. Cincinnati, dir pub rel 
Sanii'. adv mgr 
\\lt. ^ a>h.. assl to pub affairs dir 



in next issue: New and Renew on Television (Network and Spot); 

Station Representation Changes; Advertising .Agenvy Personnel Changes 



National Broadcast Sales Executives 



\eir and Renew 31 July 1950 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



David I -i-l. * 
Berry Long 
Joseph L. Merkle 
Maurice E. Mitchell 
John F. Screen 
Frank Sisson 
James T. Vandivecr 
George Wallace 
Henry S. While 
William J . Williamson 



.NBC, Chi., radio-TV net adv. prom mgr 

KOA, Denver, sis mgr 

DuMont, N. Y„ stn rel m&r 

NAB, N. Y., dir of BAB 

WABB, Molt ile, com ml mgr 

WOOD, Grand Kapids, Mich., disc jockey 

KECA-TV, L. A., dir remote telecasts 

NBC, N. V., mgr radio sis planning and research 

CBS-TV, N. V., assoc dir 

Balph H. Jones Co, Cincinnati, acct exec 



Same, radio net sis staff, acct exec 

WNBC, N. Y., sis mgr (1 Aug) 

ABC, N. Y., tv regional mgr in stn rel dept 

NBC, N. Y\, exec < eff 15 Aug) 

W r AFB-AM-FM, Baton Rouge, comml mgr 

Same, prog dir 

Same, exec prod in charge spec events and sports 

Same, mgr of adv and prom dept for sound broadcasting 

CBS, N. Y., bus mgr radio, tv net prog 

WLW-D, Dayton, sis mgr 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Roger E. Brickman 
Robert A. Davis 

Cyril G. Fox 

J. H. C. Cray 
Harold II. Morton 
Charles V. Lipps 
Richard Lock man 
Louis H. Miller 

G. L. Newcomb Jr 

Don Peltier 
Robert M. Prentice 

Richard E. St. John 
James F. Stark 
Herbert M. Stein 



Illinois Meat Co (Broadcast brand prod), Chi., sis, adv 

and prom dept 
Kraft Foods Co., Chi., asst to adv mgr 

Fels & Co. Phil a., vp, gen mgr 

Campbell Soup Co., Camden, asst adv mgr 

Singer Sewing Machine Co, N. Y., adv mgr 

Carnation Co, N. Y., eastern div sis mgr 

Mennen Co, N. Y., asst dir of adv. sis prom 

General Electric Co, Bridgeport, mgr of refrigerator 

div 
Singer Sewing Machine Co, N. Y"., asst adv mgr 
Hunt Foods, L. A., sis 
General Foods Corp., N. Y'., sis, adv asst in Maxwell 

House div 
Swift & Co, Chi., adv mgr 

General Electric Co, Bridgeport, sis mgr of fan div 
Ronson Art Metal Works Inc, Newark 



Same, sis mgr of canned meat dept 

Same, prod adv mgr in charge of salad dressings, margarine, 

malted milk, caramels and mustards 
Same, pres 

Same, suprv of media 
Same, dir of adv 
Simoniz Co, Chi., gen sis mgr 
Bourjois Inc, N. Y\, adv mgr 
Same, mgr of marketing appl.iance and merchandise dept 

Same, adv mgr 

Same, L. A. sis suprv 

Same, assoe sis, adv mgr of Calumet div 

Langendorf United Bakeries, S. F., adv mgr 
Same, sis mgr heating device div 
Same, asst adv dir 



New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



ABC Popcorn Co, Chi. 

Animal Foundation Inc, Sherburne, N. Y'. 

Fred A at aire Dance Studios, N. Y. 

Berkshire Fine Spinning Assoc, Providence 

Big League Togs Inc, Phila. 

< ulytina Citrus Co, Cambridge, Mass. 

Canieron-Bessen Corp, CI eve. 

Coble Dairy Products Inc, Lexington, N. C. 

Consolidated Products Co, Danville, III. (Div of Na- 
tional Dairy) 

Crone-Fredericks Travel Service Inc, N. Y - . 

Crown Products Co, Ralston, Neb. 

Doray Inc, Phila. 

Eastern Sewing Machine Co, sis agency for Elna Inter- 
national sewing machines. Phila. 

General shoe Corp. Nashville (Edgewood Shoe Co div) 

Howe & Co, Seattle 

Lakewood Park Inc. Long Beach. Calif. 

Lucien LeLong, N. V 

Lucky Stride Shoes Inc. Maysville, Ky. 

Majestic Fabricators Inc, Evansville 

Murine Brothers Inc, N. \ . 

Thomas Martindale & Go, Phila. 

Louis Milan! Foods Inc. May wood. Calif. 

Milltone Textiles Inc. N. Y. 

Mock Seed Co, Pittsh. 

Modern Food Process Co, Bridgeton, N. J. 
Pacific Cracker Co, L. A. 

Santa Clara Packing Co, San Jose 
Sera tan Co, Newark 



Sieucr Laboratories 
'I ip Top Foods Inc 



Inc. Pittsb. 
Oakland 



French Boy popcorn 

Hunt Club dog food 

Dancing instruction 

Combed cotton fabrics 

Clothing 

"Moja" orange juice 

Portable dishwashers 

Dairy products 

Pig and sow emulsions 



Travel service 
Rubber products 
"Doray" auto mat it- 
Sewing machines 



defroster 



"Friendly" shoes 

"Howe's** nail polish remover 

Housing project 

Toiletries 

Shoe manufacturer 

Chrome furniture 

Television, radio and appliances 

Food distributors 

Foot! products 

Worsted jersey 

Lawn seed 

*'Thrivo" dog and cat food 

"Treats Thin Flake* 1 crackers 

**CI oriel la** fruits 

Serutati 



Thomson-Porcclite Paint Co, Phila. 
\ union Pump Corp. V Y. 



Pharmaceuticals 
Whipped cream in 

ers 
Paint manufacturer 
\on -corrosive pump 



elf-dis 



Frederic R. Kleinman, Chi. 

Moser & Cotins Inc, Utiea 

A. M. Sneider & Co, N. Y. 

J. Walter Thompson, N. Y . 

Weightman Inc. Phila. 

Harry M. Frost, Boston 

Palm & Patterson Inc, Cleve. 

Piedmont, Salisbury, N. C. 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample Inc, Chi. (eff 1 Sep) 

Lawrence Boles Hicks Inc, N. Y*. 

1 in- hi in in. r & Assoc, Omaha 

A. E. Aldridge Assoc, Phila. 

Yates, Wertheim & Babcock Inc, N. Y". 

Anderson, Davis & Platte Inc, N. Y. 
Pacific National, Seattle 
Dan B. Miner Co. L. A. 
Irving Serwer, N. Y'. 
Rockmore Co. N. Y. 
Jimmie Boyd Jr. Evansville 
McLaren. Parkin. Kahn Inc, N. Y. 
The Martin Agency, Phila. 
Marketers Inc, L. A. 
Seymour Kameny Assoc, N. Y". 
Cabbott & Coffman Inc, Pittsb. 
Lamb & Keen Inc, Phila. 
Mogge-Privett Inc, L. A. 
CI asser-G alley Inc. L. A. 

Street & Finney, N. Y'. (handle Canadian ad- 
vertising eff Sep) 
Susman & Adler, Pittsb. 
Garfield & Guild, S. F. 



Wayne. Phila. 
Leonard F. Fellman 



A Askoc, Phila. 




IN SAN FRANCISCO 



He moves mountains 



Nothing stops Jim Grady. On KCBS' "This 
Is San Francisco,"* he moves mountains, 
houses . . . and merchandise. 

They're calling him Mahomet of the 
microphone around one of the local hoys' 
clul)s. For the lack of a mountain site, the) 
couldn't go camping . . . until Jim came 
through. A few words to his listeners, and 
offers of mountains poured in from one end 
of the Coast Ranges to the other! 



He's ;i handy man at moving houses. t<><». 
officials of a local lumher company agree. 
When Jim told the story of their new prefab 
houses, the dazed but happy businessmen 
had to hire an extra sales staff just to handle 
the inquiries he drew! 

It's positive proof that KCBS" Jim Grady 
can move merchandise ... mountains of it! 
Call us or Radio Sale>. and let our prophet 
spell p-r-o-f-i-t for you in San Francisco. 



KCI1S. San Francisco 
Columbia's Kev in tlte (initial Gate 
Represented by Radio Sales 



C^S 



fi Mon. thru lri..8:0U lo »: J5 a. m.. unit Sal.. 7:45 to 8:00 a.m. 




TIME BUYERS 4 
AGREE... 



iVeti? developments on SPONSOR stories 







Rote* 




5000 watts DAY 

lOOOwattsNIGHT 
Directional 

San Antonio's Oldest 
Music and News Station 



h For joe & Co. 



ps 



SeG I "Once a year" 

Issue: 31 January 1949, p. 32 

SuDICCt! Single broadcasts 



"One-shots," properly planned, can give a big pay-off. 

Sanson Hosiery Mills did it for the Easter Parade. The company 
followed closely sponsor's thinking in its article "Once a year." It 
made the point that: "The most profitable use of the one-time broad- 
cast has been where they were planned ahead so as to take full 
advantage of merchandising and promotion tie-ins." 

When Sanson was offered the two-hour Easter Parade on NBC's 
full, interconnected television network, the company grabbed it. 
But only two weeks before Easter. The company saw a logical tie-in 
between the event and its Picturesque stockings; immediately can- 
celled its newspaper campaign and diverted the budget to the tele- 
vision coverage. 

Letters went out to all the company's outlets in the coverage area 
(29 cities). The stores were asked to cooperate promotion-wise at 
point-of-sale, in local newspapers, buses, and television programs. 
The network sent out directives to its outlets; local stations combined 
efforts with various stores. The response at the local level was re- 
sounding: posters went up in elevators and throughout the stores: 
stores placed ads, made special displays. Retailers were told they 
could advertise themselves as co-sponsors of the Easter Parade. 

All ran smoothly the day of the parade with Maggi McNellis and 
Ben Grauer handling the street interviews and commercials. 

In the course of the two hours. Sanson used six commercials 
spaced about 20 minutes apart, each of about a minute to a minute 
and 20 seconds in duration. The fashion-integrated commercials 
were done live rather than on film. Many of the women interviewed 
wore Picturesque stockings, which made for perfect tie-ins. 

According to Howard G. Barnes, vice president of Dorland, Inc., 
"One additional feature that made the program so pointed toward 
the local audience in each market was the use of cut-ins, following the 
commercials, which named the local outlets for Picturesque stock- 
ings in each community." 

The response was outstanding. Over 250 major stores that handle 
Picturesque stockings wired and wrote letters of appreciation and 
congratulations. The company had the same response from viewers. 
Re-orders and sales followed immediately and at a time when busi- 
ness in the stocking industry was at low ebb. 



p.s. 



See: "Millions more call for Philip Morris" 

Issue: 24 October 1949, p. 26 

Subject: PM sets sales increase 



Last October sponsor reported, in "Millions more call for Philip 
Morris," big PM sales increases for the fiscal year ended March 1949. 

Sales for the first quarter this year rose another 19%, a rise of 
$12,448,000. Total sales for this period were $75,859,000, compared 
to $63,411,000 for the same period last year. The increase was com- 
pletely in domestic sales. 

A heavy user of radio advertising, the company recently signed 
I < n the most comprehensive and intensive spot campaign in the ABC 
network history. The campaign, on behalf of Spud Cigarettes, calls 
for 155 spot announcements per week on the network's five owned 
and operated stations: WJZ, New York; KECA, Los Angeles; WXYZ. 
Detroit. WENR. Chicago: and KGO. San Francisco. 



16 



SPONSOR 




Big Time peration — thai s television in Southern California, where you reach the nation's 
second largest T\ audience via KTTV... smack in the middle of this dynamic market! 

W ith joint supporl from the Los Vngeles Times and CBS. ..both BTO's from way back... 
we've cornered a big audience tliat looks and slays and buys. Today mam KTT\ shows originate 

from Hollywood's newest, mosl modern motion picture studios... with big plan- for even brighter, 
sales-producing shows tomorrow. Who. for example, but KTTV would take the air at I |>m. with the 

Jack Gregson Show from the Country Club Hotel swimming pool? (Note: participations available.) 
I" sell in Southern ( alifornia in the Bi« Time, ask Radio Sales foi ~^M*^. f WM ^ r ■ "^ "^^^ " los angeles times cbs television 




RADIO Al\ D TELEVISION STATION « E P R E S E N T A T I V E S 



NEW YORK 

BOSTON 

CHICAGO 

DETROIT 

SAN FRANCISCO 

ATLANTA 

HOLLYWOOD 





How to sell 
on Saturday nite 



Advertisers love radio's barn 
danees for their fun. frolic, 
and potent sales punch 






over-all 



Duck for the oyster, dive for the 
clam. 

Duck for the one in the tuna can! 
Square dance calls such as this ringing over 
the airwaves delight millions of listeners who 
wouldn't miss their favorite barn dance pro- 
gram come Saturday night for anything in the 
world. And ham dance programs are delighting 
a growing number of sponsors who've found 
them tops for tapping the sales potentialities of 
an intensely loyal audience. 

Not long ago. this type of entertainment was 
shrugged off by many big-city sponsors as 
"corn" \n ith appeal only for a rural audience. 
Nowadays they know better. It's not "corn. 
and, by cracky, the folks are going for it in < it\ 
and country alike. What's more, they buy 
what's advertised on these programs; results 
prove it. Miles Laboratories credits the almost 
overnight development of Alka Seltzer in great 
part to its sponsorship of a National Barn 
Dance segment I W'LS. Chicago I for 14 years 
(1933-46). Here's the first four-year record: 

1931: Alka Seltzer introduced 
1932: Sales not so hot 
1933: Started on Barn Dance; sales fair 
1934: Up over 500$ ! 
1933: One month (January) alone ahead 
of whole year 1933; sales up-up 



Comedy star Minnie Pearl on WSM's "Grand Ole Opry' 




EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT BARN DANCES LIKE THOSE PICTURED ABOVE WOW FARM, TOWN, AND BIG-CITY LISTENERS ALIKE 



And this fabulous sales reaction was 

by no means limited to the rural areas 

it was also surprisingly evident in 
such metropolitan eenters as Chi< - 
Milwaukee. South Bend. Indianapolis. 
Following the WLS-only success, Miles 
sponsored its half-hour Bam Da 
segment for years over NBC Blue. 

More results? In 1947, the Ralston 
Purina Company, using Grand Ole 
Oprj (WSM, Nashville), found that 
one of their products which had either 
dropped in sales or remained the same 
as the \ear before in all other parts of 
the country, enjoyed a 45', increase 
in the area covered by Opry. 

Hundreds of other sponsor success 
j-tories hear similar evidence. 

\- traditionally American as the hot 
dog, the barn dance harks back to the 
Saturda) night fun. music and danc- 
ing of the early American pioneers. 
1 hough indigenous to the rural areas, 
within recent \ears this t\pe of enter- 
tainment has seeped into the cities as 
well. And it's bigger than ever in 
rural communities. Radio has been 



chiefly responsible for spreading the 
barn dance gospel. 

The nostalgic appeal of barn dances 
for the many citj folk who have coim- 
lr\ roots is a factor which helped the 
barn dance grow in the city. Today 
there is scarceK a large city in the 
I nited States that doesn't have its 
square and folk dance centers. Cosmo- 
politan New ^i ork City has many, one 
located in i of all places > Carnegie 
Hall. Summertime public square dances 
in New ^t ork > sponsored bv Pepsi- 
Cola since 1944) have turned thou- 
sands of city sophisticates into stomp- 
ing folk dance enthusiasts. It's esti- 
mated that well over 250,000 flocked to 
these rustic affairs in 1949. Similar 
dances held for test purposes in Chi- 
. _ . Dallas. Richmond. Hartford. 
Washington, P. C. and Atlanta, also 
met with gratifxing success, reports 
Pepsi-Cola. 

Cit) slicker or country cousin, its 
the warm, friendly, down-to-earth. 
"folks\ appeal of the barn dance ra- 
dio program that gets "em. A combina- 



tion of folk-song artists, comedy num- 
bers, square dance calling, vodeling. 
novelty acts and instrumental special- 
tics, these shows are good, clean, 
wholesome fun for even member of 
the family. And how millions of fami- 
lies enjoy them — even Saturdav 
night ! 

On a barn dance program the com- 
mercials are virtually part of the en- 
tertainment. The announcers talk in 
homey, familiar terms that ring "right" 
to the listener — rarely jar with shout- 
ing, high pressure, or synthetic talk 
1 maybe via transcription ' that doesn't 
"belong"' in the setting. 

From a humble start some 25 vears 
ago when several stations around the 
country began to offer local folk talent 
and got surprisingly wide listener- 
ship 1 , barn dance programing has 
blossomed. Back in 1931. the W LS 
National Barn Dance moved to Chi- 
- 1 ighth Street Theatre from the 
the W LS studio when the traffic of ru- 
ral visitors overwhelmed the station. 
Then not once, but twice nightly, ca- 



20 



SPONSOR 




GOOD-HUMORED ANTICS. GUITAR PLAYING. FIDDLING. SING NIG, NOVELTY ACTS ARE INGREDIENTS OF ALL BARN DANCES 



pacity crowds of 1.200 paid admission 
and filled the theatre for both of the 
two-hour shows into which the four- 
hour stage program was divided. An 
average Saturday night at the Barn 
Dance would see some 25 or more 
states represented in the audience (and 
still does) . 

Another example of not-enough- 
space, the Iowa Barn Dance Frolic 
(WHO, Des Moines) moved in 1933 
from an 800-seat auditorium in Daven- 
port to the 1.300-seat President Thea- 
tre in Des Moines, then in 1935, to the 
Shrine Auditorium where 4,200 seats 
were often inadequate to accommodate 
the throngs that flocked from far and 
near. WWVA, Wheeling, and KWKH. 
Shreveporr. are other stations where 
the barn dance sign generally reads 

SRO. 

These in-person radio-stage broad- 
casts with paid admissions have be- 
come characteristic of the major barn 
dance shows and are a powerful hypo 
to listener-interest. Most of the barn 
dance personalities have programs of 

WNAX barn dance merchandises via newspaper ads 




570 on Your Dial 




MIRTH. FILLED MOMENTS LIKE THIS ONE ON WLS' NATIONAL BARN DANCE HELP GIVE ALL BARN DANCES UNIVERSAL APPEAL 



their own spotted throughout the week- 
ly schedule of the station, which enable 
them to create their own legion of fans 
to draw to the big weekly windup on 
Saturday night. 

Daddy of the barn dance programs 
is the WLS National Barn Dance, 
which started with the opening of that 
station back in 1924 and is the oldest 
continuous commercial radio program 
on the air. It still adheres to the origi- 
nal format of singing, dancing ( mostly 
square I. and authentic American folk 



music, featuring Lulu Belle and Scotty, 
Bob Atcher, Captain Stubby and the 
Buccaneers. John Dolce, the Arkansas 
Woodchopper, the Maple City Four 
and others in the cast of almost 50. Up 
to 1 April, nearly 2,000,000 people 
had attended the National Barn Dance 
broadcasts in Chicago. Another 772.- 
775 had paid to see and hear WLS acts 
in personal appearances in 1949. 

National Barn Dance sponsors jeal- 
ously guard their segments on the 
show. The Murphy Products Company 



(feeds) has sponsored a half-hour seg- 
ment every Saturday night for 20 con- 
secutive years. Keystone Steel & Wire 
Co. ( fencing equipment ) has been a 
sponsor for 16 years; the Flex-O-Glass 
Co., 12 years; Phillips Petroleum, six 
years. Newer sponsors are Dolcin 
Corp. and Lehon Co.. both on two 
years. 

Grand Ole Opry. famous folk show 
aired over WSM, Nashville, will be 25 
years old in October 1950. Though it 
[Please turn to page 48) 



BY-PRODUCTS THAT HELP SPONSOR INCLUDE SONG BOOKS, PICTURE ALBUMS, PAID-PERFORMANCES, PERSONAL APPEARANCES 




Task force for 




Radio takes on job of providing 

local impact when going gels rough 
for Nabisco dog biscuit 



j£'?5\ Radio is lh«- National Bis- 
^^5 S cun Company's advertising 
^jjp^ task force as far as its dog 
food, Milk-Bone, is concerned. 

In most markets where sales are <>iT 
or below the apparent potential, local 
radio participations get the nod from 
Stewart Boyd, advertising manager of 
the National Biscuit Company's cereal 
and dog food divisions. So far radio 
has never failed to pay off in in- 
creased sales. Since 1940. when Milk- 
Bone bought its first local participa- 
tion, expenditures for radio have 
grown steadily I except for a wartime 
intermission I . 

Milk-Bone is not one of the most 
important products of the $300,000,- 
000 Nabisco operation — such as Pre- 
mium Crackers or Ritz — but it is a 
profitable end of the business. And 
Milk-Bone dominates the baked dog 
food market in dollar volume as well 
as quantity output. 

Milk-Bone has been able to achieve 
this position on only a small fraction 
of the total Nabisco advertising bud- 
get. About half of the annual Nabisco 
advertising appropriation of $6,000,- 
000 is spent in radio and television. 
Of this $3.000.000-odd kitt\. about 
$1,000,000 is earmarked for Arthur 
Godfrey's plugging of a variety of Na- 
bisco products on CBS. A large slice 
of the Nabisco radio budget — about 
$500.000 — is spent each year on Mu- 
tual's Straight Arrow, for Shredded 
Wheat. 

The funds for Milk-Bone radio and 
TV are drawn from a separate radio 

31 JULY 1950 



Milk-Bone fund. Onlj about 20', of 
each Milk-Bone advertising dollar i> 
spent in broadcast media. The rest 
goes into printed media — Life, Satur- 
day Evening Post, various farm and 
sporting publications - and point-of- 
sale. The total broadcast expenditure 
comes to about $200,000 annually. 

Today Nabisco is using radio par- 
ticipations for Milk-Bone on 10 sta- 
tions in 12 scattered states, and a video 
participation in Cincinnati I Rutb Ic- 
ons' show on WLW-TVi. The average 
frequency of the radio participations 
is three times weekly, but there is one 
cross-the-board Milk-Bone participa- 
tion I WFMJ. Youngstown 
eral twice-weekl) schedules 
station lineup follows: 

Connecticut Hartford 
Indiana Indianapolis 

Kentucky Louisville 

Maine Bangor 

Portland 
Massachusetts Boston 



and se\ - 
The Wl 



Michigan Detroit 

Missouri Kansas City 

St. Louis 

Nebraska Omaha 

Ohio Akron 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Youngstown 

Pennsylvania Pittsburgh 

Rhode Island Providence 

Texas Dallas 

Ft. Worth 
Houston 

(Please turn to page 42) 



// TIC 

WFBM 

WAVE 

WLBZ 

WCSH 

WBZ-A 

WJR 

WHB 

KWK 

KOIL 

n ikr 

WLW 

II .III 

WFMJ 
KDK I 
WJAR 
WRR 
KFJZ 
K \l /. 




Premiums given to test shows include this boolc 




Company sponsored dog show on TV for prestige 



23 



SM>Oi\SOR suggests 



LET'S PUT ALL MEDIA UNDEI 

"Share of time" is a valid basis for eommon-denominator 

measurement* of radio, TV, magazines, and newspapers 



letivities other than radio lose most time to TV 



April 3 radio 

1949 54 rain, 



TV 
31 mi 



reading, 
theatre, etc, 
95 min» 



radio 

Feb. ^5 4 3 mlru 

19«_)0 11 mln. less 



TV 
68 min, 

37 mln. more 



reading, 
theatre, etc. 

G9 rain. 

26 rain, less 



10 pm 



'Source: Sindlinger and Co. 



Daily listening ami reading time per adult 

% OF POPULATION 

8 
100 




i i i i 
12345 

Hours of 

Radio 

Listening 



12345 

Hours of 

Newspaper 

Reading 



12345 



Hours of 

Magazine 
Reading 



'"A Psychological Corp. study presented here as an example of time based research. 



How much is radio north.' 

That's a question that the Radio and 
Television Steering Committee of the 
ANA is currently attempting to an- 
swer. And we are convinced that, in 
the American tradition of fair play, 
advertisers are seeking an honest an- 
swer. They want to pay what radio is 
worth — no more, no less. 

Radio's worth as an advertising 
medium {particularly network night- 
time radio) is being challenged today 
I rincipally because of the growth of 
77 viewing. Signs multiply that maga- 
zines and newspapers will soon be in 
for similar analysis. 

The effect of TV viewing on other 
advertising media is changing rapidly 
— so rapidly, in fact, that researchers 
hesitate to make specific statements. 
But one fact is clear: radio listening 
rd urns to TV homes increasingly 
{especially on an individual listening 
I asis I as the novelty of TV viewing 
diminishes. 

How much is radio worth? That's 
an intriguing question — but ndt one 
that can be answered fairly yet. 

In the article that follows sponsor 
advances a revolutionary technique by 
which radio {and TV, magazines, 
newspapers) can be measured fairly 
end accurately soon. 

There's something radically wrong 
with radio (and TV) research. 

It's not just that a multiplicity of 
rating services is turning out more 
and varied figures than advertisers and 
hroadcasters can properly digest. Just 
as important is the fact that the mass 
of ratings, sets in use data, share of 
audience, and the like put radio at a 
distinct disadvantage. 

Advertisers frequently take one 
frightened look at broadcasting sta- 
tistics and go where the air is clearer. 



24 



SPONSOR 



ME SAME MICROSCOPE 



This means the printed media, whose 
main selling tool is nothing more fear- 
some than a mere circulation figure. 

SPONSOR suggests a common denomi- 
nator which will permit advertisers to 
judge all media by the same yardstick. 

This yardstick is TIME. 

With time as a measure, the broad- 
cast media would be under the micro- 
scope only to the same degree as news- 
papers and magazines. Done under 
ANA or AAAA sponsorship, all media 
could be sure of fair and equal treat- 
ment. 

Measuring the amount of time 
people spend with each medium is not 
an original sponsor idea. A. C. Nielsen 
has used the concept of late. And, in 
its 3 July 1950 issue, sponsor reported 
on the Sindlinger research done in 
Philadelphia. It pointed out then that 
TV borrowed time from all activities, 
not just radio listening. And "all ac- 
tivties" include newspapers and maga- 
zines. 

The most appealing feature of the 
time concept is its simplicity. The 
basic research can be done in several 
ways. There would be no confusing 
statistics, no arguments over whose 
method was right. The present uncer- 
tainty of San Francisco's KJBS (and 
countless other broadcasters) over 
whether researcher Hooper or Ros- 
low is right would never arise. The 
basic time scale, serving as the take- 
off point for more qualitative informa- 
tion would be so simple that a retailer 
who knew nothing about "media ef- 
fectiveness" could understand it. 

In 1945 and 1947 The Pulse did sev- 
eral definitive studies of human activi- 
ties during specific time periods. But 
they were dropped because "there was 
no apparent need or use for such data." 
Today the need exists. Only competent 
research can discover how people are 
actually spending their time; mere 
guesswork is dangerous. 

Researchers and advertisers point 
out that charting people's activities for 
even part of the day is expensive. The 
total bill might be large, but if all in- 



terested parties split the cost of such 
basic common-denominator studies 
instead of financing a myriad of dis- 
connected ones, the individual tariff 
would be small. One wa\ of reducing 
cost might be to adopt the suggestion 
of Dr. Roslow of Pulse that frequence 
counts of activities be made at regu- 
lar intervals. By a house to house co- 
incidental survey, the activity of everv 
person at the time of interview can be 



tabulated. Such a studs would be done 
directly for advertisers, rather then for 
media. 

Why this hue and cry for a uniform 
look at media.' For the simple reason 
that research in radio has focused at- 
tention on radio's slightest variation. 
The radio research microscope immedi- 
ately reports if Fibber McGee & Molly 
have dropped two Hooper points. Does 
(Continued on page 551 



Pulse measurement of home aetirities* 



7-8 a.m. 


7:00 


7:15 


7:30 


7:45 


Sleeping 


60.5% 


52.5% 


42.0% 


36.6% 


Getting up, dressing 


18.1 


17.8 


17.5 


10.7 


Shaving, shower, bath 


2.6 


7.1 


7.1 


3.1 


Eating breakfast 


5.8 


7.6 


10.7 


18.5 


Getting breakfast 


5.2 


8.4 


12.6 


11.7 


Feeding baby 


2.3 


2.9 


2.1 


2.6 


Housework 


3.9 


5.0 


5.8 


7.6 


Reading paper 


— 


0.3 


0.8 


1.6 


Listening to radio 


1.6 


0.3 


1.3 


2.1 


Listening to radio in bed 


0.8 


1.0 


0.3 


0.3 


Not at home 


2.1 


3.1 


3.7 


6.5 


Leaving for work 


1.6 


2.1 


3.7 


6.5 




— 


— 


0.3 


0.3 


TOTAL 


104.5 


108.1 


107.9 


108.1 



(Over 100% due to multiple activities) 

* This study is presented only as an indication of what researchers can do 
by way of measuring activities on a time basis. It was conducted in 1945. 



31 JULY 1950 



25 




learly every station has one 

TV telephone ginimiek shows guarantee sponsor 

high interest, low eost audienees on net and individual stations 




HARRY GOODMAN'S PHONE OPERATORS ARE THE EXCEPTION! ON TV TELEPHONE PROGRAMS; MOST MC'S CALL VIEWERS 






Telephones are jingling 
in TV homes and studios 
just as insistently as they 
are on radio. And. as TV producers 
and sponsors grasp the potentialities 
of linking home and studio by wire, 
telephone gimmick shows on television 
may well equal their radio counter- 
parts in number. 

Big reason for the telephone's suc- 
cess on the visual medium is the pow- 
erful feeling TV gives that ''you arc 
there." A viewer calling the studio 
can see the MC, even the phone opera- 
tor who answers. The full potentiali- 
ties of this personal contact type <>f 
program haven't yet been realized. 
There is still room for clever exploita- 



tion of the phone gimmick on T\. 

sponsor made a random survey of 
television telephone shows, found nine 
afternoon and 12 evening stanzas. The 
many different types of formats in these 
21 shows can be broken down this 
way : 

1. Game 111 

2. Quizzes 

a. Variety show — usually musi- 
cal (4), b. News (41. c. Spoits 
(2 l. d. General (21 

3. Auction — viewers bid for, or 
trade articles (4) 

4. Disk Jockev I 2 I 

5. Shopping Service (2) 

Most of the TV shows outlined above 
arc still in swaddling clothes. This 



makes it difficult to present detailed 
sales results as was done in a previous 
article about radio telephone pro- 
grams. A notable exception is the TV 
Telephone Game; it's been on the air 
long enough to pile up an impressive 
sales record for its sponsors. 

The TV Telephone Game is a Harrv 
S. Goodman production which opened 
on WJZ-TV 14 months ago under a 
$1,000,000 contract with ABC. Since 
then the game has spread to WFIL- 
TV. Philadelphia, and WGN-TV, Chi- 
cago. Stations in Detroit, Boston, 
Cleveland. Cincinnati, Los Angeles, 
and Baltimore are expected to take it 
on soon. 

What's so remarkable about the TV 



26 



SPONSOR 



Telephone Carney Reddi-Wip, a re- 
cently-launched whipped cream, bought 
a 13-week participation. Distribution 
in New York hefore sponsorship 
totaled 18,000 cans a week; it jumped 
to 60,000 cans a week after the first 
13 weeks. 

Wizard Wick, a liquid deodorant 
made by Boyle-Midway I subsidiary of 
American Home Products I followed a 
similar pattern. During the first nine 
months of 1949, total Wizard Wick 
sales in New York brought in only 
$9,000. Less than two months after 
joining the TV Telephone Game, 
Wizard Wick sales zoomed to over 
$10,000 — for a single month. 

Swift & Co. could tell a similar story 
about their peanut butter. The com- 
pany tried unsuccessfully to break into 
A & P supermarkets for years, but 
several weeks' participation on the 
show brought admittance. Swift was 
so pleased it used the show for clean- 
ser, pork sausage, frankfurters, and 
hamburgers as well. 

Altogether there are six participa- 
tions on WJZ-TV Wednesday thru 
Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Weekly cost for 
this four-day stint is $480. Other sta- 
tions are charging $325 a week for a 
five-day schedule. 

The TV Telephone Game is like 
Bingo. You write the station call let- 
ters at the top of a sheet of paper and 
under each letter one figure from your 
telephone number. Contestants with- 
out a phone can use the last five fig- 
ures of their social security numbers. 
The game proceeds with the MC ask- 
ing questions, then offering a choice 
between a right and a wrong answer. 
Each answer has a number attached 
to it. For example: "Is a mandarin a 
Chinese official or a musical instru- 
ment? If you think a mandarin is a 
Chinese official and you have a .5 under 
the W in WJZTV. then circle that 5. 
If you think it is a musical instrument, 
circle the number 4 under the W . If 
you have neither a 4 or 5 under the 
W, then disregard this question." 

Every day between 1,500 and 2,500 
people call in to check their cards. 
Between 400 and 600 of those who call 

( Please tu m to page 44 I 



J. Quiz "Stop the Music" is heavy on entertainment 

2. WJBK-TV adaptation of AM quiz adds drawings 

3. Shows like WOR-TVs "What Am I Bid?" do well 
-I. Games like this Goodman standout are scarce 




file 
telephone 

Aame 







&»* 







■■,-■'■■/■■ 

"it -:!Bi!: : : : '3i?:!. : :Sx: : : 

i-N-i'S-T-;"- 





*# * * 



V %1 






WRVA'S EXTRA STEP 

MEANS EXTRA SALES FOR YOU ! 



Even a tot-size budget * 

i 
can fill big sales-shoes on WRVA, 

through our extra-step programs 

\ 

i • * 

that give you , 

i 
top, big-time talent * 

i 
at little more than announcement cost! 

Participation in these established 

t 

i 

programs with proven personalities 

i 

and planned promotion ', 

can step your sales up * 

from the bootee class \ 

into seven-league boots! 



OLD DOMINION BARN DANCE 

Monday thru Friday, 9:00-10:00 am. and 3:30-4:30 pm. 
Designed for high ratings and general listening. Fea- 
tures *CBS network commercial stars on a local basis. 
*(Brock Bar Ranch, CBS, Saturdays 7:00-7:30 pm.) 

GRADY COLE Tim 

Monday thru Saturday, 5:00-6:00 am. Designed espe- 
cially for rural audience and features fabulous Grady 
Cole. (Combination purchase with WBT, Charlotte, N.C.) 

CALLING ALL COOKS 

Saturdays, 10:00-10:30 am. Audience participation 
quiz from WRVA Theatre (average audience of 800). 
Radio show is part of two-hour entertainment. Product 
displays; samples distributed; with retail grocer mer- 
chandising plan; actual product demonstrations. Buy 
it weekly, bi-weekly, or once a month. 

HOUSEWIVES PROTECTIVE LEAGUE 

Monday thru Saturday, 5:00-5:30 pm. Features Mark 
Evans and is designed primarily for food and house- 
hold products. 



>WRVA 



♦r* 



EXTRA 



t^fr 



50,000 WATTS • RICHMOND AND NORFOLK, VA. • REPRESENTED BY RADIO SALES 



What media team up best with TV ? 

CBS circulation studies show how well various forms of 

advertising link with television for total coverage of a market 



Example: St. Louis market 

This is what happens when eight national magazines join TV but radio is dropped: 






-31.7% 

circulation loss 
inside TV area 


-58.5% 

circulation loss 
outside TV area 






But results are quite different when three national magazines equalling cost of a 30-mini 
nighttime network radio program are dropped and a second radio program is ADDED: 


Jte 




+46.1% 

circulation gain 
inside TV area 


+47.8% 

circulation gain 
outside TV area 







The highly significant figures shown above were compiled by CBS for a circulation study 
of media in the St. Louis market. Complete breakdown of CBS figures below. The figures 
demonstrate radio's superiority to printed media for use with TV to cover area inside TV area 
and counties beyond. 





Without 


television 


With t 


Revision 


Radio sh 


ow added 




Families 


Families 


Families 


Families 


Families 


Families 




inside 


outside 


inside 


outside 


inside 


outside 


MEDIA 


TV area 


TV area 


TV area 


TV area 


TV area 


TV area 


Radio (KMOX) 


458,079 


248,861 


dropped 


dropped 


916,158 


497,722 


Newspaper (Post-Dispatch) 


233,697 


27,876 


233,697 


27,876 


233,697 


27,876 


Television 








136,000 





136,000 





McCall's 


43,663 


24,054 


43,663 


24,054 


43,663 


24,054 


Ladies' Home Journal 


49,121 


23,929 


49, 1 2 1 


23,929 


49,121 


23,929 


Saturday Evening Post 


38,463 


19,166 


38,463 


19,166 


38,463 


19,166 


Life 


44,542 


18,657 


44,542 


18,657 


dropped 


dropped 


Look 


27,456 


18,125 


27,456 


18,125 


27,456 


18,125 


Good Housekeeping 


38,226 


17,720 


38,226 


17,720 


38,226 


17,720 


Woman's Home Companion 


45,325 


15,876 


45,325 


15,876 


dropped 


dropped 


Collier's 


36,465 


11,054 


36,465 


11,054 


dropped 


dropped 


Units of circulation 

(total families) 


1,015,037 


425,318 


692,958 


176,457 


1,482,784 


628,592 


Percentage of increase 














or decrease in circulation 








-31.7% 


-58.5% 


+ 46.1% 


+47.8% 



30 



( hie cil the toughest prob- 
f .' lems facing national and 

^^■^ regional advertisers to- 
day is deciding where to cut current 
budgets (if new money isn't available) 
to provide money for television. Who 
gets cut is the all-important question. 
For from it emerges the answer to who 
will provide advertising coverage in 
regions beyond the intense, or mer- 
chandisable, coverage of television sta- 
tions. This primary area usually ex- 
tends 40-50 miles from the transmitter. 
Whether an advertiser decides to 
cut network radio or printed media 
can mean the difference between solid, 
meaningful coverage in "outside" mar- 
kets — and circulation so puny as to 
leave a market wide open to a swift 
steal by the competition. 

St. Louis, and surrounding counties 
making up the primary coverage of 
KMOX, a 50 kw radio outlet, provide 
an example basically typical of other 
parts of the country where spacing of 
TV stations now leave important areas 
without merchandisable sight-and- 
sound coverage. An analysis of the 
number of families living within that 
part of KMOX's primary service area 
which lies outside the TV primary 
area, and the extent of their buying 
power, provides a good example of 
similar situations in other TV markets. 
Suppose a radio advertiser decides 
to make network television his Sun- 
day punch in metropolitan centers. 
What would happen in the "outside" 
territory where KMOX has a BMB 
audience of 50-100% (50% or more 
families in each county listening to 
KMOX at least once each week) ? 

In this "outside" market live about 
377.000 families. They have a buying 
power of well over a billion dollars. 
About 333,000 of these families own 
one or more radios. The total radio 
families in this area make up 40% of 
all radio families in the entire example 
area. 

The "inside" market (that 40-50 

SPONSOR 



mile area with primary TV coverage I 
has about 529,000 families. Approxi- 
mately one out of four of them owned 
TV sets as of 1 July. Here too, as in 
practically all metropolitan areas, more 
than 96% of all families own radio 
sets. 

There are 44'/ as many family 
"subscribers" to KMOX alone living 
"outside" as live within TV's primary 
area. This example area is a fair sam- 
ple of the situation in many others. 
What happens to "outside coverage 
when television comes in and some 
other media goes out can be applied 
generally to many other important 
markets. 

What about radio, magazine, and 
newspaper coverage in the St. Louis 
"outside" market? The facts, plus a 
little arithmetic, will give us a clue as 
to where those TV dollars can come 
from without seriously damaging the 
basic "outside" coverage. 

Life, the nations biggest week I \ 
magazine, gets into more homes in 



Morgan Count) than am other coun- 
ty in the area. But that adds up to 
only 12% coverage (source: Audit 
Bureau of Circulation). Life's circu- 
lation in Morgan County is still far be- 
low the 50ft BMB (half of all families 
listening at least once a week to a 
given station l most advertisers use as 
a gauge of minimum primarj cover- 
age. 

In Montgomery Count) . 1ft of the 
3,800 families listen to KMOX once 
a week. Life "covers" the Count) with 
165 copies a week (source: Consoli- 
dated Circulation Service, February 
1950), U'i coverage. On the same 
basis — total families, whether radio 
owners or not. KMOX has 70' < cir- 
culation in this County. 

In the entire primary area — includ- 
ing the TV 40-50 mile area— KMOX 
provides 00', coverage of all families 
This again includes non-set-owners in 
the base. Over 17' < of these total 
families listen to KMOX 0-7 nights a 
week. 



Life's average coverage for the en- 
tire "outside" area is onl) 1!!.(>">7 
copies, or 5%. 

Throw in the l ( '.l(><> copies of the 
SEP and you add onl\ 5.1', more. 
Look's 18,125 copies add another 
4.8% and Collier's 11,054 copies 2.9ft 
more. That's 12', coverage to add l<> 
Life's 5'< for this outside area. 

Add in the monthly coverage of the 
four leading women's service maga- 
zines (McCall's, Ladies' Home Jour- 
nal, Good Housekeeping. Woman's 
Home Companion I . You still get onl) 
21.6' %. more coverage. That s a com- 
bined total, not counting duplication, 
of 33.0',. Cutting down on maga- 
zines to help pa) for television would 
generally mean minimum loss of cir- 
culation in "outside"" markets. 

How does newspaper circulation 
stack up in this outside area? 

The leading paper is the St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch. Its top circulation is 
in I'erry Count), with 2!!', of its 
i Please turn to page 52 I 



Example: ftncfto t'overayi' outside the St. MjOuIs area 



How LIFE and radio compare in 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

1 1,000 population 

LIFE 

circulation — 165 copies 

applying Politi 4.8 "readers" 
per copy, 792 readers 

or 7% coverage 



KMOX 

circulation — 2,600 
families 

applying audience composition 
2.34 listeners per set, 6,248 
listeners 



MONROE 



or 56% coverage 




31 JULY 1950 



31 



s> 





I 






A 



/0/0 



►*~ a!?- ,-•> *> r^ 



SALES HAVE PROVED WORTH OF TUCKER USE OF RADIO. BUT MOST FURRIERS LAG IN PROMOTION, SUFFER AS RESULT 



A SPO NSOR roun dup: 

Furs on the air 

Handful of ad-wise retailers do well; 
most furriers suffer from laek of national 
push, inept promotion, exeise tax 



over-ail 



Things haven't been going 
well for the fur industry. 
From fur breeders to retailers, very 
little coordination exists; there's an 
appalling lack of sound organization 
throughout the whole industry. With 
a few notable exceptions, fur advertis- 
ing has been spasmodic and as disor- 
ganized as the fur business it attempts 
to plug. 



32 



The 20 '/( federal excise tax is a tre- 
mendous obstacle. 

The wails of despair are not without 
reason. There has been a steady de- 
cline in business since 1946. The 
Broadcast Advertising Bureau of NAB 
recently prepared a report about the 
fur industry. BAB found that in 1946 
the total retail sales were $450,000,000 
(even then $50,000,000 below 1940). 



fur; 


r 


1 f 

M 


s 

1 


mm/mmi 


la 



Indiana Fur Co. is another standout sponsor 

Today sales amount to no more than 
an estimated $350,000,000, are off 
about 53°/t . The industry needs plenty 
of good sound promotion. 

One national organization, recog- 
nizing the need for fur promotion, is 
attempting to do something about it. 
The Associated Fur Manufacturers, 
with its 700 members, has begun a na- 
tionwide campaign to promote furs, 

SPONSOR 



using radio and TV as the primar\ 
media. The Association, hacked with 
$300,000, has given Eleanor Lambert 
the job of making the pitch. Her task 
is to spread knowledge about furs to 
the consumer at large. Three TV films 
I1-, 15-, 30-minutes) have been pre- 
pared. 

Other trade organizations exist, such 
as the American National Fur Breed- 
ers Association and the Master Fur- 
riers' Guild of America. None of them 
do much promoting; the door i* wide 
open. 

Furs pass through eight stages lie- 
fore they reach the ultimate market: 
(1 I trapper or breeder; (2) collector: 
(3) dealer or merchant; (4) auction 
bouses; (5) dressers and dyers: 6) 
manufacturers; 7i jobbers; (8) re- 
tailers. I here is no unity among these 
various levels, little exchange of in- 
formation, and practical!} no coordi- 
nated effort in promoting sale of furs. 
Yet each segment is ultimately depend- 
ent upon the whims of the consumer. 

The industry has ruffled its own furs 
with its advertising ineptness. Mrs. 
Americas confidence has been badl\ 
shaken. One leading fur buyer sums it 
up with: ''Women no longer believe 
what they hear about the entire fur 
trade because they have come to be- 
lieve that furriers are just like many 
retail fur ads . . . inclined to exagger- 
ate." This combined with a general 
lack of knowledge about furs and pelts, 
increases the buyer's wariness. Add 
to this a high-unit-priced item, and 
you practically have a barrier to sales. 

With national activity at a low ebb. 
practically all promotion or advertis- 
ing is done by retailers. Generally, it's 
not expert. Most retailers' efforts are 
highly seasonable and lack solid plan- 
ning. Because sales are declining, and 
costs are doing the opposite, a majori- 
ty of the outlets have all but choked 
their ad budgets. This vicious evele 
doesn't lead to increased sales. 

Proof of what can be done in ad- 
vertising is illustrated by a few of the 
better-organized, promotional-minded 
fur firms. Dupler s in Denver, Evans 
in Chicago, Canadian in New York, 
Ben Tucker's Hudson Bav in New 
York, and Davidson's in Indianapolis, 
to name a few. Their advertising is 
well-planned and generally year-round. 
A large slice of the ad budget goes for 
radio. Since the fur industry is one of 
style, the ad-minded firms are giving 
TV more than a cursory glance. 
(Please turn to page 52) 



.1 cross-section of 

SPONSOR 



fur advertising on the air 

STATION PROGRAMING SCHEDULE 



Clearfield Furs; 
Clearfield and 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 


KDKA, 
Pittsburgh 


announcement 
transc. muscl. show 


12 mo. 
winter mo's. 


London Alaska; 

Amarillo, Tex. 


KFDA; 

Amarillo 


newscast 
announcement 


2/wk. 

5/wk. 


Conrad Furs; 

Winona, Minn. 


KWNO; 

Winona 


muscl. prog. 


5/wk. - 52 wks. 


Cappels Furrier; 
Dover, Ohio 


WjER; 

Dover 


muscl. jingles 


5/wk. 


Victor; 

Philadelphia, Pa. 


WFIL-TV; 

Philadelphia 


announcement 


2/wk. 


Hamilton Furs; 

Portland, Or. 


KGW; 

Portland 


newscast' 15 min.) 


3 wk. -seasonal 


Troy Laundry; 

Norwich, Conn. 


WICH; 

Norwich 


muscl. jingles 


10/wk. 


Wermuth Furs; 
Sioux Falls, S. D. 


KIHO; 

Sioux Falls 


30 min. show 


Sundays 


Louis Furs; 

Worcester, Mass. 


WNEB; 

Worcester 


announcement 


10/wk. -52 wks. 


French Way; 

Des Moines, 1. 


KIOA; 

Des Moines 


15 min. muscl. 
show 


3/wk. 


Hertzberg Furs; 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 


WEED; 

Rocky Mount 


muscl. jingles 


1/dy. 


Davidson's; 

Indianapolis, Ind. 


WFBM-TV; 

Indianapolis 


muscl. show 
announcement 


1/wk. 
5/wk. 


Canadian; 

NYC & Newark, N.j. 


WNEW; 

New York 
WHOM; 
New York 
WAAT; 

Newark 


dj show 
announcement 
announcement 

announcement 


4/wk. 

60 to 70/wk. 

variable 

variable 


Ben Tucker; 
NYC 


WINS; 

New York 


15 min. show 
announcement 


4/wk. 
18/dy. 


Lockguard Furs; 

Meriden, Conn. 


WMMW; 

Meriden 


muscl. jingles 


1/dy. 


Bicha Furs; 

LaCrosse, Wise. 


WKBH; 

LaCrosse 


15 min. show 


Sundays 


Sully's Furs; 

Detroit, Mich. 


WKMH; 

Dearborn 


5 min. prog. 

announcement 

5 min. show 


5/wk. -6 mo's. 
5/wk. -2 mo's. 
5/wk. -4 mo's. 


American Furs; 

Salt Lake, Utah 


KSL; 

Salt Lake 


15 min. news 


5/wk. 


Kussell Furs; 
Boston, Mass. 


WEEI; 

Boston 


partic. progr. 


5/wk. 


Clen Falls Furs; 

Glen Falls, N. Y. 


WWSC; 

Glen Falls 


weather jingles 


20/wk. 



Here's the way fur sales vary from month to month 

January 77.3% July 3.4% 



February 6.9 

March 5.9 

Apn7 ..... 4.7 

May 7.6 



June 



7.7 



August .... 7 7.5 

September 70.5 

October 72.2 

November 75.2 

December 75.7 



(Federal Reserve System, 1949) 



31 JULY 1950 



33 





BAKING COMPANY 




APPLIANCE STORE 




SPONSOR: Ward Baking Co. AGENCY: J. Walter Thompson 
CAPSULE CASK HISTORY: The Ward Baking Com- 
pany wanted to bring their name and product to the at- 
tention of more St. Louis customers. They decided to use 
the Housewives' Protective League program and offer lis- 
teners a free calendar. The result' in three weeks the 
HPL pulled 27,036 requests. And the cost for bringing 
the Ward name to the attention of listeners was only three 
cents per inquiry. 

KMOX, St. Louis PROGRAM: Housewives' 

Protective League 


SPONSOR: John E. Larrabee Co. AGENCY: Direct 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This company, selling ap- 
pliances, hardware and sporting goods, used two night- 
time 15-minute programs. This was backed up by an- 
nouncements during the day for several days selling tele- 
vision exclusively. The firm used no other media and the 
staff was unable to handle all of the calls resulting from 
their air advertising. Final sales reached a total of $4,125 
while cost to sponsor was $100. 

WCSS, Amsterdam PROGRAM: Musical Stars 






RADIO 
RESULTS 




BOOKS 




SPONSOR: Doubleday & Co. AGENCY: Huber Hoge 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: These book publishers gave 
one of their $2.95 books a one-time plug. The offer was 
made on a news commentary show, a WGN rebroadcast 
of the Sidney Walton program. From this one broad- 
cast, Doubleday & Co. received over 1200 book orders. 
The gross amounted to about $3,600 worth of business; 
the advertising cost of their radio offer came to 16c per 
order. $3,600 worth of books for about $192 in program- 
ing costs. 

WGN, Chicago PROGRAM: News commentary 




BAKERY 


TREE PREMIUM 








SPONSOR: Victor Adding Machine AGENCY: John W. Shaw 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Victor Adding Ma- 
chine Company wanted to give something useful to their 
radio listeners. They decided to offer a farm record book. 
Participating announcements (approximate cost $54) were 
used on WLS Farm World Today. Twenty announce- 
ments were used for this offer. Some 2,400 requests were 
received for the record books for an average of 120 books 
per announcement and increased goodwill. 

WLS, Chicago PROGRAM: Farm World Today 




SPONSOR: Kaufmann's Pastry AGENCY: Direct 

1 \PSl I.K CASE HISTORY: Kaufmann's Pastry Shop 
of Omaha used one announcement at a cost of $12.50 on 
the Poll) The Shopper program. By four o'clock in the 
afternoon, as the result of this one announcement, the 
bakery had sold 200 coffee cakes and 200 pumpkin pies, 
or approximately $300 to $400 worth of baked goods. 
And people who had heard the announcement swarmed 
into the bakery until its 6 p.m. closing time. 

KOIL, Omaha PROGRAM: Polly The Shopper 




TELEVISION SETS 


GROCERY STORE 








SPONSOR: Fairway Grocer) AGENCY: Direct 
CAPSULE CASK HISTORY : For the past two autumns, 
this grocery store has successfully used announcements in 
a participating show to sell Jonathan apples. Two an- 
nouncements at a cost of $6.60 each sold one carload. 
Four more announcements helped sell another carload. 
An interesting sidelight to this story is that the grocer and 
the majority of his customers are located some 48 miles 
from the station. 

CK.X, Brandon. Manitoba PROGRAM: Announcements 






SPONSOR: Lee Television AGENCY: Direct 

1 VPSl I.K CASE HISTORY : The Lee company decided 
to use radio to test its effectiveness in promoting cus- 
tomer sales. The firm ran five announcements at a cost 
of $25. As a result of these announcements, they sold HO 
telex ision sets which have a retail value of $8,000. The 
firm made a gross profit of more than $3,000. The spon- 
sor adds: "We can estimate sales will be well over $10.- 
000 as a result of our small investment.'' 

WLOW, Norfolk PROGRAM: Announcements 


i 





MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL 

The Northwest 
Empire Station 

'epresented Nationally by AVERY-KNODEL, Inc. 



31 JULY 1950 



35 



By anybody's 




O , 9 



I 



count . 




2 , T 



There's been some pretty complicated arithmetic 
in radio lately. But the 1950 Winter season 
is over now and all the figures are in. No matter 
who totals them ... no matter what you count 
...two things come clear every time. Radio's clear 
leadership over all media in reaching people. 
And the continuing leadership of CBS in all radio. 

COUNT CIRCULATION... CBS reaches 
30,972,700* different families weekly . . . biggest 
circulation in radio. (And far bigger than any 
other advertising medium.) 

COUNT PROGRAM POPULARITY... 

CBS has broadcast 15 of the 20 most popular 
programs this year**. . . more than 3 times as 
many as the second-place network. 

COUNT AVERAGE RATING... CBS has an 

average nighttime rating of 11.9... 32% higher 
than the second-place network.** 

COUNT HOMES PER DOLLAR... CBS 

reaches the average of 489 ... 17% more than 
the second-place network.*** 

COUNT TOTAL BILLING... CBS advertisers 
increased their investment to $23,911,229**** 
. . . giving CBS the only 1950 network gain . . . 
8'; higher billings than the second-place network. 

This is CBS in 1950 

-the greatest single advei'tising opportunity 
of them all . . . and you can count on that. 



•MU. February-March, 1950 
•• XRI. January April. 1950 
•'• Time anil talent night — January-March. 1D50 
•••• I'lli, January-April, 1950 





Mr. Schorr 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Spector 

From the looks 
of present busi- 
ness inquiries 
and contemplated 
schedules now 
be in»; submitted 
to clients by agen- 
cies, and in com- 
parison to other 
years. I feel that 
by the end of Au- 
gust availabilities 
will be scarcer than hen's teeth. 

More and more it is becoming quite 
evident that buyers of spot radio are 
looking for saturation. A term grow- 
ing very popular these days is "cu- 
mulative ratings. "" The buyer who for- 
merly wanted a 5 or 6 rating for a spot 
would rather have, today, three or four 
spots . . . provided the cumulative 
rating is the same and the price not 
very much more. In the case of inde- 
pendent stations, the value of cumu- 
lative ratings is even more valuable, 
due to the added effectiveness and im- 
pact of the commercial delivered by a 
local disk jockey whose audience is ex- 
tremely loyal and responsive. 

This opinion is based squarely on 
our current experience. For instance, 
one important advertising agency 
I which prefers to remain anonymous 
here I told us of the experience of one 
of their clients, in the proprietary 
medicine field. For two years, this ad- 
vertiser had used one announcement 
daily on a large New York station. 
Early I his year they dropped that sta- 



Mr. Sponsor asks... 



What is the outlook ior time availabilities on 
independent radio stations? 



A. Spector 



Vice president, sales and advertising 
Bonafide Mills, Inc., New York 



tion and used the same appropriation 
to purchase one announcement daily 
on each of three independent stations. 
Not only was their cumulative rating 
larger, but the advertiser reported a 
sharp increase in sales in the New 
York area. There was no other change 
in their advertising or merchandising 
operation here. 

Several weeks ago, we at WOV de- 
veloped a new '"Unit Purchase." for the 
specific purpose of capitalizing on the 
cumulative rating approach. Before 
inaugurating an extensive promotion 
program on this unit I the WOV "Daily 
Triple" I our salesmen made eight pre- 
liminary calls on the larger agencies to 
get their reaction. When these eight 
calls resulted in one schedule to start 
immediately, and the inclusion of the 
"Daily Triple" on two other schedules 
for early fall broadcasting, we had 
good reason to believe we were on the 
right track. 

Because of this new concept in spot 
radio timebuying, which in my opinion 
certainly makes sense, advertising 
agencies will be doubling and tripling 
the number of spots on each schedule. 
The client will get more for his money 
and will be happy. The radio station 
will be sold out of spots and will have 
to sell programs to clients who are too 
late to buy spots. Consequently, the 
client will learn the value of building 
a franchise with a good program and 
will be gratified. All in all, it looks as 
if 1950 will wind up being a terrific 
year for everyone . . . except the guy 
who waited until it was too late to buy 
cither spots or programs. 

Herb Schork 
Sales manager 
WOV 

\ eic ) ork 




Mr. Kelly 



In general, the 
outlook is good. 
In my opinion we 
should be able to 
buy a good range 
of time, perhaps 
a shade better 
than a year ago. 
And this, during 
the period 6:00 
to 10:00 p.m. 
I see no indi- 
cation that radio is withering before 
TVs onslaughts or intends to drop by 
the wayside. Yet it is no secret that 
many staunch radio advertisers now 
have plans, completed or under way, 
to embark on television advertising. 
Radio and TV are in collision, and un- 
questionably, TV is on the move. The 
newcomer has grown from 1,000,000 
sets at the beginning of 1949, to 
5,800,000 sets as of 1 May 1950. And 
an "industry estimate"' places the sets 
at 9.000,000 by the end of this year. 
An upcurve so spectacular must be con- 
sidered in any long-term view of ra- 
dio availability. 

In TV homes, radio listening is said 
to have been cut from three hours and 
40 minutes before TV, to 24 minutes, 
afterward. This is bound to have an 
an effect on actual and potential radio 
advertisers and thus has some bearing 
on availability. The apparent vigor of 
the new, competing medium should 
make our answer more decisive if the 
same question should be asked say a 
year from now. 

William S. Kelly, Jr. 
Media director 
J. M. Hickerson, Inc. 
New York 



38 



SPONSOR 




Although world 
conditions have 
remained unset- 

opinion that spot 
radio will reach 
an all-time high 
this fall. Each 
year the dollar 
volume has in- 
creased in leaps 
and bounds, de- 
spite the fact that competitive media 
have redoubled their efforts to get their 
share of the advertisers' dollar. This 
can mean only one thing: Spot radio is 
the cheapest, most flexible, and most 
productive form of advertising yet de- 
vised by man. Schedules right now 
are extremely tight, and fall buying 
has not yet really started. When the 
usual rush gets under way within the 
next few weeks, all stations will be 
hard pressed to clear suitable time for 
advertisers. 

Timebuying is becoming more and 
more scientific each day, and buyeis 
are depending in most cases pretty 
much on program adjacency ratings to 
substantiate their purchases. It is ob- 
vious, therefore, that with these condi- 
tions stations in a market are rated, 1, 
2, 3, or 4 despite power or affiliation. 
When station 1 with high ratings no 
longer has top availabilities to offer, 
the agencies and advertisers will try to 
obtain choice time on stations 2. 3 or 
4 rather than buy something inferior. 
This means that all stations, in my 
opinion, will enjoy a banner year. The 
independent station, which ordinarily 
has the greatest difficulty in building 
substantial ratings, will particularly 
profit by this condition because, with 
time so tight, the agencies and adver- 
tisers will be more willing to review the 
entire picture before a purchase is 
made. Consequently, the independent 
will be given more opportunity to show 
its wares than ever before, and as a 
result its business is bound to increase. 
I am a great believer in the old say- 
ing: "If you make enough calls, you 
are bound to get results. '" Therefore, 
with a more receptive audience among 
the buyers, which will enable the inde- 
pendent to get its story over better, the 
situation should improve for them this 
fall. 

F. Edward Spencer. Jr. 
General Manager 
George P. Hollingbery Co. 
New York 




Lo the national advertiser, this means that 
any one of the five ROBERT MEEKER offices now 
can supply you quickly with facts and 
figures on both our AM and TV operations. 

Station WTTS (5000 WaTTS— 1370 K.C) is 
located in the heart of the world-famous 
limestone center, in Bloomington, Indiana, which 
is also the home of Indiana University. 

Bloomington is the only little city of its size 
(between 25 and 30 thousand) in the whole 
nation with its own television station. 
Station WTTV affiliations include NBC-TV . . . 
ABC-TV . . . CBS-TV, and Dumont 
Television Network. 

With balanced audience (rural, industrial and 
urban population) we offer an ideal test 
market at low cost. 



THE ! SARKES TARZIAN STATIONS 



I 



WTTS ! WTTV 



I 



BLOOMINGTON 
INDIANA 



Represented Nationally by 
ROBERT MEEKER ASSOCIATES, INC. 

New York • Philadelphia • Chicago • San Francisco 
Los Angeles (Tracy Moore) 



31 JULY 1950 



39 




, . . and in Richmond we picked' 

WRNL 

THE 1 AND ONLY 
RICHMON D, VA. 
STATION THAT 
GIVES BIG DAY- 
TIME COVERAGE 
AND AUDIENCE! 



The RICH RICHMOND trad- 
ing area is IN-THE-BAG 
saleswise when you BUY 
WRNL. SURE-FIRE SALES 
strategy calls for A- 
NUMBER-1 salesmen. That 
means WRNL, and . . . 

HERE'S WHY 

There are 5 Radio Stations in 
Richmond, Virginia. 

1 50,000 WATT 

' 1140 KC— DIRECTIONAL 

2 5000 WATT 
' 1380 KC— DIRECTIONAL 

3 250 WATT 
1450 KC— LOCAL 

A 1000 WATT 
' 950 KC— DAYTIME 



AND THE 



1 



AND 



UJRI1L 

5000 WATTS 
NON-DIRECTIONAL 



910 KC 



ABC 
AFFILIATE 




EDWARD PETRY & CO. INC. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 




This is a new SPONSOR department, featuring capsuled 
reports of broadcast advertising significance culled from 
all segments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed. 

KOME's Lewis Meyer makes novel participation pay off 



A half-hour show divided into four 
acts and shared by seven sponsors may 
start a new trend in participation pro- 
graming. 

The Lewis Meyer Variety Show 
broadcast over KOME. Tulsa's 5.01)0 
watt MBS affiliate, has a sponsor wait- 
ing list to back up its success story 
wherein Lewis Meyer spurns disk 
jockeying and makes chatter pay off. 

Meyer divides his time into four 
main "acts,' plus a time signal, a late 
ball score summary, and a signoff cab 
call. 

Act one is the John Zink Book Shelf. 
sponsored by Tulsa's giant floor fur- 
nace and burner plant. In this seg- 
ment. Meyer selects the John Zink 
"Book of the Week" and reads a por- 
tion of it each night. 

In act two, sponsored by the Talbot 
Theatres, Meyer moves on to movie 
reviewing. Each night he reviews a 
current attraction at one of Tulsa's 
downtown theatres. After the mid-way 
time signal (sponsored by Doenges 
Ford ) and the day and night baseball 



HmUg 




Meyer samples sponsor's wares while on the air 

scores (sponsored by Martin's day- 
and-night prescription service) music 
aids the transition to act three. 

Act three is the Kenby Poetry Pick- 
up . . . here again the unusual ap- 
proach to radio selling pays off. Meyer 
sells cut-rate gasoline through poems 
of inspiration and poems of the open 
road. 

In act four, Mever dishes himself 
out some Hawk's Home Town Ice 



Cream while discussing philosophy 
from his Home Toivn Scrapbook. 
Then, when the closing theme, Senti- 
mental Journey, comes on, Meyer dials 
a Checker Cab and engages in a brief 
and imaginary conversation, finally 
ordering a taxi to take him home. 



Horton's reaches for eream 
via concentrated pluys 

Concentrate >our TV announce- 
ments on a specific time slot instead of 
scattering them over various channels 




Commercials win fans for Horton's ice cream 

at odd times. That's the way the Hor- 
ton's Ice Cream Company has achieved 
low-cost television coverage in a single 
market. 

The Horton's announcements, eight- 
second station breaks produced by 
Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield. are seen 
on WABD. New York, immediately 
preceding the New York Yankee home 
games. 

The Horton's announcements start 
with drawings by New Yorker car- 
toonist Sam Cobean. Two characters 
that denote emotional conflict are used. 
A motorist and a taxi driver, a ball 
player and an umpire, a bride and 
groom. One says, "I love chocolate," 
and the other. "I love vanilla." Copy 
that follows is slugged. "But every- 
body loves Horton's cream-m-y ice 
cream!" 

I he same characters used on the 
TV announcements appear also in 
some 25 New York and New Jersey 
newspapers giving the Horton's ads 
double impact. 



40 



SPONSOR 



KUTA has "radioai'tive"' merchandising progrttm 



KUTA in Salt Lake City calls it 
radioactive merchandising. 

It's their answer to the question of 
how a 5,000-watt station operating in 
a market of 500.000 or less can do an 
effective merchandising job with a spot 
rate of less than $25 for the class "A" 
time. 

The station uses an attractive point- 




Sampling booth spurs sales -for KUTA sponsors 

of-sale sampling booth. It contains a 
built-in phonograph and amplifier 
with portable speakers that are set up 
throughout the store and add greath 



New TV filming technique 
mag cut costs 

A new TV filming process called 
Vidicam may cut down production 
costs, the bugaboo of many a TV 
show. 

Television Features Incorporated, a 
division of Larry Gordon Studios, re- 
cently displayed the system which 
eliminates the one-camera system and 
makes it possible to film a half-hour 
television show in less than an hour. 

The filming process works like this: 
A monitor board is connected to three 
RCA Victor Vidicam-TV cameras. 
Each camera is synchronized with spe- 
cially adjusted motion picture cameras 
and linked together by camera cable. 

From a monitor board, directors 
watch the filming, viewing the three 
different pictures in the monitors. By 
using an intercom system to each cam- 
eraman and an automatic change-over 
system to each camera, a film control 
director can make cuts from one cam- 
era to another. And, as each film cam- 
era is automatically turned on or cut 
off a synchronization mark is made on 
the film identifying splicing points. 

The Vidicam system will make it 
possible to shoot four or five half-hour 
to hour shows in one day's time. And. 
as the bulk of TV film production ex- 
penses are figured by the day, produc- 
tion costs will be cut by one quarter. 



to the amount of attention attracted 

The station hires a woman to dem- 
onstrate the product and she is quali- 
fied to answer all questions concern- 
ing the item being plugged. The whole 
operation belongs to KUTA. The ad- 
vertiser needs only to have plenh of 
stock on hand and stand bark. 

The station is prepared to put a 
dozen such stands in operation to bol- 
-Irr sale.-, \iiil. < on-idei m;j thai each 
of them serve 1,500 to 3,000 cus- 
tomers on an average Saturda\. tliat- 
good coverage. 

In return for the four to six feet 
of floor space the grocer provides, 
KUTA gives him a few announcements 
plugging the products to be featured 
in the booths on Saturday. 

In addition to bolstering sagging 
sales, the scheme also increases the 
station's personal contact with its 
listeners. 




Briei'lg . . . 

WCCO, Minneapolis, has started the 
audience promotion phase of its third 
annual summer sales drive by moving 
Friday and Saturday night local shows 
to a picnic pavillion. Move is sup- 
posed by on-the-air plugs to attract 
an audience of 2,000 a week. 

* * a 

WCOP, Boston, recently gave its lis- 
teners an idea of the processes involved 
in the brewing of beer. WCOP mikes 
and recording equipment were taken 
down to a Miller Hi-Life mobile unit 
and listeners got a verbal picture of 
how the brew was concocted. 

* * * 

KFOR, Lincoln, Nebraska, awarded 
a certificate of appreciation to the 
Hardy Furniture Company for its 




KFOR awards 8-year sponsor with ceriificatc 

eight continuous years of newscast 
sponsorship. On the anniversary date, 
the station used the personnel that had 
appeared on the newscast eight years 
ago when the show began. 



Reaching 
More 



The 1946 Broadcast 
Measurement Bureau 
Study gave KVOO 
a total of 347,450 
daytime and 378,520 
nighttime families. 



The 1949 BMB 
Station Audience 
Report showed 
increased 
KVOO coverage 
as follows: day- 
time BMBfamilies, 
411,380; night- 
time, 455,920. 



With no increase in rates 
since 1946 these increased 
KVOO BMB families 
mean increased coverage 
at lower cost per family. 

An added factor of great 
importance is that 64' t 
of KVOO BMB families 
report 6 and 7 day per 
week listing to Okla- 
homa's greatest Station! 

This important bonus comes to 
advertisers as a direct result of 
KVOO's 25 years of dominance 
In Oklahoma's number one 
market. 

See your nearest Edward Petry 
& Company ofice or call, wire 
or write KVOO direct for 
availabilities. 





31 JULY 1950 



41 




WHAT'S HAPPENING 



to ^htouston 



an 



K- 


NUZ 


Ranks 


No. 


2 for 


10 


Hours 






M< 


jnday 


Throt 


Sh 


Friday, 


or 


50 


Hours 


Per 


Week 



K-NUZ Share of Audience: 

Morning, Monday Through Friday — 

8 AM to Noon 19.4*, No. 2 in 

Houston 

Afternoon, Monday Through Friday 

—Noon to 6 PM 15.3, No. 2 in 

Houston 

*(Hooper Index, April-May, 1950) 

Now More Than Ever 
Houston's Best Dollar Buy! 



No. 1 Availability: 

"K-NUZ Corral"— I 1 :30 to I 1 :45 
AM, Monday Through Friday 
Hooper* 5.0, No. I. In Houston 
Source: April-May Hooper, 1950 



CALL, WIRE OR WRITE 

FORjOE: NAT. REP. 

DAVE MORRIS, MCR. 

CE-8801 

k-nuz 

(KAY-NEWS) 

9th Floor, Scanlan Bldg. 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



MILK-BONE 

[Continued from page 23) 

Milk-Bone uses printed media na- 
tionally, radio and TV sectionally. 
Nabisco uses the broadcast media for 
"trouble shooting." Whenever an in- 
dividual market develops a sagging 
sales curve, out comes the radio hypo. 
The magazines, meanwhile, do the 
broad, national selling job, backed by 
the tremendous Nabisco sales organi- 
zation of more than 3.S00 persons, big- 
gest in any field. 

The current U. S. population, from 
the viewpoint of the Milk-Bone admen. 
is narrowed down to about 45,000,000 
—20.000,000 dogs, and 25,000.000 
cats. (Cats go for Tiny Bits, small 
pieces of Milk-Bone.) Those 45,000.- 
000 cats and dogs, then, represent the 
fullest extent of the potential U. S. 
market for Milk-Bone or any other dog 
food. 

The dog food industry as a whole 
has strengthened considerably since 
the war, in line with the improved gen- 
eral economy. Dogs, as a matter of 
fact, have never had it so good. The 
canned dog food industry — virtually 
extinct during the war. although many 
ex-G.Is will dispute this — is picking up 
too. Today about 50' V of all dog food 
sold in this country is canned, the rest 
being dry. Milk-Bone and Tiny-Bits 
represent a good share of the remain- 
ing 50 /V . Annual sales total about 
$10,000,000. 

Dog owners last year bought about 
a billion pounds of dog foods and 
spent about $120 million. They spent 
$2,000,000 to attend dog shows all 
over the country; and 150,000 dog 
owners spent $600,000 in entrance fees 
for dogs entered in the various shows 

Milk-Bone's history goes back 40 
years to a small factory-bakery in 
Brooklyn. The original firm was tak- 
en over in 1928 by the National Bis- 
cuit Company, which built a new and 
much larger Milk-Bone factory. Na- 
bisco bought its first radio time for 
Milk-Bone on New England's Yankee 
Network in 1940. The original buys 
were local participations. These have 
|jio\i'd so successful for Milk-Bone 
that Nabisco has seen no reason to 
change the original radio pattern. 

When it comes to actual timebuying, 
the Nabisco agency, McCann-Erickson, 
takes an active hand in the reviewing 
of Milk-Bone markets and the selec- 



tion of stations. Milk-Bone buys the 
female audience almost exclusively. 
If it came to a hard choice, they would 
buy a low-rated program with a sol- 
idly female audience over a higher 
rated mixed audience show — a new 
program, for example. 

A study of 6,000 dog-owning fami- 
lies by the Psychological Corporation 
backs up Milk-Bones reasoning. The 
study showed that mothers actually 
feed the dog 73% of the time. 

All Milk-Bone air time is bought 
during daylight hours, mostly mid- 
morning and early afternoon. The 
firm buys the standard 13-week cycle, 
and seldom remains in an individual 
market for less than two years. 

Boyd feels that it is impossible to 
measure directly the extent to which 
radio ups sales in a given market. In 
all cases, use of radio is tied in with 
other efforts such as direct mail, or 
extra merchandising. He believes that 
one important result of local radio ad- 
vertising is the increase it brings in 
interest among Nabisco salesmen them- 
selves. When the salesmen feel their 
market is getting special attention, 
they make a special effort to push 
Milk-Bone. 

The Milk-Bone commercials them- 
selves are usually ad-libbed rather than 
read verbatim. Nabisco sends each 
participating broadcaster sample com- 
mercials containing the essential Milk- 
Bone selling points — high nutritional 
value, vitamin content, pleasant flavor. 
However, broadcasters are encouraged 
to adapt the basic commercial to their 
individual selling style, and thus 
heighten the personal appeal. Nabisco 
keeps tabs on the situation by collect- 
ing copies of the commercials that have 
actually been broadcast, and maintain- 
ing close liaison with the broadcasters. 

Boyd is a firm believer in the strat- 
egy of using local radio and local TV 
to give "local endorsement" to the 
product. Locally is where such en- 
dorsement is needed, he points out, 
since purchase is the pay-off. Boyd is 
keeping a sharp eye on television, and 
concedes that Milk-Bone may one day 
have a video show of its own — as dis- 
tinguished from participations — when 
it becomes "economical" to do so. 

By this he means when the build-up 
in set-ownership reaches a point where 
it can whittle down considerably the 
present cost-per-viewer figure. He re- 
calls that Nabisco has used film spots 



42 



SPONSOR 



WOW!! 



TALK ABOUT RESULTS ! ! ! 



o„ th eG0LDEN GATE QUARTET 



(260 brand new transcribed selling quarter-hour episodes) 



SINCE OUR AD IN THE JUNE 5th SPONSOR . . . 
RESPONSE HAS FAR EXCEEDED OUR FONDEST HOPES 

n the SPONSOR announcement alone . . . 

five stations phoned us, ordered the show, asked how soon they could start. 

Within four days of its presentation . . . 

Biow bought the Golden Gate Quartet, its first open-end show, for Pepsi-Cola. 
. . . ordered special Golden Gate commercials and took color movies of their 
recording session. 

In less than two weeks . . . 

over 200 stations, agencies and clients requested audition discs. 

As this issue goes to press . . . 
requested auditions near the 400 mark. 



1 

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TRANSCRIPTION SALES INC 



47 West 56th Street, New York 19, N. Y. 
Phone: COIumbus 5-1544 



17 West High Street, Springfield, Ohio 
Phone: 2-4974 



31 JULY 1950 



43 



Best Buy in 

SOUTHERN 

NEW ENGLAND 

WTIC 



Families 

in the WTIC 

BMB Area 

have a gross 

effective 
buying income 

of 
$3,265,518,000 



* * 



-BMB Study # 2, 19 19 
**Copyright Sales Management Sur- 
vey of Buying Power, May 10, 1950 

SUGGESTION — For complete 

WTIC-BMB Study call 

Weed & Co. 



PAUL W. MORENCY 
Vice President — General Manager 

WALTER JOHNSON 
Assistant General Mgr. -Sales Mgr. 

WTIC's 50,000 Watts 

Represented nationally by 

WEED & COMPANY 



. MflRK« 



WTIC 

0OMINATCS 

THE f>«OSI»EliOMs 

SOUTHER* HEW *KC\IVHX> 

market: 




for Milk-Bone in the New York area 
and found the cost rather high. While 
there appears to have been no reliable 
research into the correlation between 
TV-set ownership and dog ownership, 
there is no doubt that the two go to- 
gether in a high percentage of cases. 

For the past two winters, Nabisco 
has sponsored a telecast of the blue- 
ribbon dog show event on behalf of 
Milk-Bone — the annual Westminster 
Kennel Club show at Madison Square 
Garden, New York. Boyd feels that 
such special events give Milk-Bone a 
distinctive prestige appeal which is in- 
\ aluable to such a product. Especial- 
ly in view of the increasing competi- 
tiveness of the dog food market. Na- 
bisco's president, George H. Coppers, 
wasn't thinking only in terms of Milk- 
Bone when he addressed a stockhold- 
ers' meeting recently, but his words 
apply equally to Milk-Bone as to the 
other Nabisco products: 

*'We believe that sales of our prod- 
ucts are going to continue at high 
lev els through the remaining months 
of 1950. although we expect and are 
preparing for more active competition 
for the consumers dollar."' 

Nabisco checks on the size and loy- 
alty of Milk-Bone's radio audience at 
intervals with offers of dog-leashes and 
various booklets and brochures on 
Care and Feeding, in return for prod- 
uct box tops. 

The Milk-Bone booklet contains ad- 
vice to dog owners on Coping With 
Bad Habits (Jumping Up On People. 
Chasing Cars) preceded by a recital of 
the sterling qualities of the animal in 
question : 

"Dog is a gentleman through and 
through. He shares your fortunes and 
misfortunes cheerfully . . . other friend- 
ships wax and wane but a dog's love 
never diminishes. He would lay down 
his life for you if need be . . . but all 
he asks in return is a pat on the head, 
a kindly word, food enough to sub- 
sist on." 

There is a strong implication that if 
the faithful old fellow could only speak 
his mind, he would ask nothing more 
for his reward than a bellyful of Milk- 
Bone. This is pretty much the same 
view that is taken in the Milk-Bone 
radio and TV commercials. And it 
must be true, because not a single po- 
tential Milk-Bone customer has ever 
indicated otherwise. Can 20,000.000 
dogs and 25.000,000 cats be wrong? 

• • • 



TV PHONE SHOWS 

l Continued from page 27 I 

in or write by mail are winners each 
week, which puts the total number of 
winners since the game began in New 
York at 30,000. Merchandise prizes 
provided by each sponsor are the key 
to the show's success. Winners get 
prize coupons which must be redeemed 
at their local grocers. These prizes 
are worth only about $6.00 at retail, 
yet redemption ranges around 88% — 
considerably higher than the usual 
15% or so redemption of conventional 
coupons given away. When a winner 
walks into his neighborhood store to 
claim the prizes, he is unaware of his 
role as a distribution lever for the 
program's sponsors. For, if the local 
grocer or supermarket doesn't stock a 
prize product, the winner is asked to 
call the company. A company sales- 
man promptly visits the local mer- 
chant, points out that this winner and 
many to follow will be in to collect 
their prizes. Would they care to have 
old customers cash their prize cou- 
pons elsewhere? The retailer usually 
gets the point and orders a case or two, 
maybe more. 

Unlike many other telephone-quiz 
games, the Telephone Game is on firm 
legal ground. It was passed by the 
U. S. Post Office because chance is not 
involved: every possible combination 
of numbers is called regularly, in 
cycles. Duplicate prizes are offered 
throughout each cycle to avoid unfair- 
ness when sponsors change. 

This safety from anti-lottery prose- 
cution is a big reason why a large 
movie theatre chain will shortly intro- 
duce the game into its many houses. 
Bingo may be coming back, but with 
a Goodman twist. 

Quiz shows as a class are still the 
most popular telephone gimmick pro- 
grams on TV, as they are on radio. 
Network productions like ABC's Stop 
the Music and Sing it Again on CBS 
are of the variety show type with elabo- 
rate entertainment. On 5/op the Music, 
for example, Admiral Corp. and P. 
Lorillard Co. (Old Gold) pay $6,500 
each for half-hour segments every 
Thursday between 8:00 and 9:00 p.m. 

Besides the two big network shows, 
sponsor surveyed two other variety- 
type quiz shows. Crosley Broadcast- 
ing "s musical quiz-participation pro- 
gram, Get On The Line, has just started 
on WLW-T, Cincinnati; WLW-D, Day- 






t 



44 



SPONSOR 



ton; and WLW-C. Columbus. John 
T. Murphy, Crosley's Director of TV 
operation, tells why this summer show 
was put on: "We simply wouldn't ac- 
cept the idea that summer time was 
bad television time. Our revenue from 
this eight-week summer series will ex- 
ceed what we stood to lose from the 
customary network hiatuses." All par- 
ticipations on the one-hour, five-day a 
week show have been snapped up by 
such national and regional sponsors as 
Readers Digest, Chesterfield. Conti- 
nental Baking Co.. Autobrite, Sun Oil 
Co., Red Top Beer, and Oxydol. 

Telephone gimmick shows can do 
more than counteract the summer hia- 
tus. Although WCBS-TV is saying 
little, on 3 July it launched what may 
be strong competition for Anchor- 
Hocking's Broadway Open House on 
WNBT five weekday nights at 11:00. 
The WCBS-TV venture is Variety Quiz, 
a clever use of the 1.040 three-minute 
shorts put out by Official Television, 
Inc. as "Music Hall Varieties." This 
package of novelty acts and musical 
numbers was described in a sponsor 
article on films for TV (5 June 1950). 

Format of the 45-minute Variety 
Quiz involves the screening of shorts 
followed by questions about these by 
phone. Winners among the dozen or so 
persons called each night get merchan- 
dise prizes. 

Other types of quizzes are also popu- 
lar on TV. No less than 13 of the 
21 programs surveyed by sponsor were 
quizzes. Among the straight general- 
type quiz programs is the TV version 
of Tello-Test on WJBK-TV, Detroit. 
Its television twist is the sketching of 
clues by an artist. Merchandise prizes 
are included in the sponsor's package 
price of $40 per participation for the 
daily 3:30 to 4:00 p.m. show. 

A similar general quiz is Time for 
Terry on WBAP-TV, Fort Worth. 
Sponsored by Chicago-Webster Re- 
cording Equipment, the program fills 
a 9:00-9:30 p.m. slot every Wednes- 
day. 

Sports, which have been a big TV 
subject from the first, provide subject 
matter for several very successful tele- 
phone quiz shows. Tom Moorehead, 
WFIL-TV, Philadelphia sportscaster, 
calls several people each week from a 
stack of 8,092 postcards received dur- 
ing the first two-and-a-half months of 
Name the Star. Regina Cigar Co. 
pushes Hillcrest Cigars on the 15- 
minute program. Contestants who an- 




FOOD SALES GROW FAT, TOO 

when WTAR and WTAR-TV sell the 
Norfolk Metropolitan Market for you! 

The potential is plump for food products in the 
$100,000,000.00* Norfolk Metropolitan Market — 
Norfolk, Portsmouth, Newport News, Virginia. WTAR 
and WTAR-TV bring home the sales for food adver- 
tisers because . . . 

WTAR delivers more listeners-per-dollar than any 
combination of other local stations. Check any Hooper- 
ating to see the overwhelming listener preference for 
WTAR. 

WTAR-TV, on the air since April 1st, is already 
selling to more than 15,000 set owners (as of May 1). 
That's right, 15,000 sets in one month's operation in 
a brand new television market. Proof enough of WTAR 
popularity. 

So, get your food products on the heaping tables 
of the Norfolk Metropolitan Market with WTAR and 
WTAR-TV. Ask your Petry office, or write us. 



"Sales Management Survey of Buying Power, 1950 



AM— NBC Affiliate 
5000 watts Day and Night 

TV — Inter-Connected 
NBC, CBS, ABC, and Dumont Affiliate 




Norfolk, Virginia 



31 JULY 1950 



45 



To a radio advertiser 

who can't afford Godfrey 

In case you're beginning to believe that Arthur lias 
all the CBS time on the air and all the dough in the 
world, lake coinage in this fact: segments of Iowa are 
still autonomous. 

There's good reason to believe that Iowa's income i- 
greater than Godfrey's — and his isn't half industrial and 
half agricultural. Iowa grows more corn than 
Godfrey. Iowa hogs produce more ham than Godfrey. 
A single. Iowa silo is bigger than Godfrey. Iowa has 
two more Senator- than Godfrey. Godfrey may know 

i e about an oookelele, but who eats oookeleles? 

Iowa products more beef than Godfrey and Texas 

combined. 

Yes, and WMT is on the air more hours in a single 

day than Godfrey is all week. What's more. WMT has 

more -| sol - than Godfrey! 

WMT's 2.5 mv contour encompasses well over a million 
people, a good portion of whom listen to Godfrey. 
They also listen to non-Godfrey time. A one-minute 
Class A commercial on Eastern Iowa's WMT budgets 
at $27.00 (52-time rate) which is practically chicken- 
feed even to folks with non-Godfrey incomes. Please 
ask the Katz man lor additional data. 



5000 WATTS 



600 KC 




DAY & NIGHT 



BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 




TRIBUNE TOWER OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Represented Nationally by Burn-Smith 



swer a preliminary sports question get 
a crack at naming the mysterious star 
athlete of past or present. Weekly 
clues to his identity help contestants 
in their bid for a $2,000 jackpot. 

News provides grist for mam quiz- 
program mills. George Putnam MC's 
Headline Clues for WABD, New York, 
from 12:00 to 12:30 p.m. every week- 
day. News pictures are the source of 
questions about people and incidents 
in the news. Another WABD news 
quiz is Broadway to Hollywood on 
Wednesdays from 10:00 to 10:30 p.m. 
Questions concern news of the movie 
and theatrical world. Tidewater Asso- 
ciated Oil Co. has sponsored the show 
tor the past three months. 

WJBK-TV. Detroit, has a more elab- 
orate news quiz called Pop The Ques- 
tion. Contestants must identify per- 
sons or events depicted on a short se- 
quence of newsreel film. 

SPONSOR found a straight merchan- 
dising-type program being used on two 
stations. Shop at Home on WTNV, 
Columbus, operates weekdays from 
11:00-12:00 noon by demonstrating 
merchandise before the TV camera. 
Housewives can call in and designate 
the items they'd like to see. Rich's 
Department Store in Atlanta performs 
a similar service over WSB-TV. This 
show grew out of an expedient used 
by the store during the recent 37-day 
transit strike in Atlanta. 

77 Trades on WICU, Erie, Pa., 
shows how simple an appealing TV 
program can be. The show acts as a 
clearing house for traders. The MC 
holds up an item sent in and invites 
trades. Phones begin buzzing as home 
viewers offer a highchair for a tricycle, 
or a wash basin for a pitcher. 

SPONSOR found the old-fashioned 
auction being dressed up and put on 
television. Telesales, which recently 
went on summer hiatus at WMAR-TV, 
Baltimore, was scheduled in the 8:00- 
8:30 p.m. Thursday slot. Format of 
the show had studio and home audi- 
ences bidding against one another for 
valuable merchandise prizes provided 
by one of the five participating spon- 
sors. All reported heavy sales of ar- 
ticles auctioned off on the program. 
Handing out studio audiejice tickets 
at the advertisers' stores helped build 
traffic. 

Cleverest use of the auction format 
with a telephone gimmick is to be 
found in two programs soon to be 
merged into one. They are What Am 



46 



SPONSOR 



FROM NOW ON, WWJ-TV's 

advertisers can take audience 
for granted. With the number 
of sets now well beyond the 
quarter-million mark, television 
in the booming Detroit market 
has emerged completely from the 
experimental stage and reached 
the age of full productivity. 




C 



hitifed I 



WWJ-TV supports its belief 
in the stability of television in 
Detroit with its new rate card 
(#8) which is guaranteed to 
advertisers for one full year! 



FIRST IN MICHIGAN 



Owned and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS 



National Representatives: THE GEORGE P HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 

ASSOCIATE AM-FM STATION WWJ 



NIW Television Network 



31 JULY 1950 



47 



W I B C 



Indiana's 
First and Only 

50 KW Station 




WIBC offers all of Hoosierland in one profitable 
package — plus important out-of-state "bonus" cov- 
erage — and at the lowest rates of any 50 KW sta- 
tion in the middle west. 

Within WIBC's 0.5 MV contour live 1,068,166 
radio families* . . . with total buying power of 
$4,985,952,850.00.** 

*1949 BMB 
**1950 Sales Management Survey of Buying Power 



Ask your John Blair 
man about valuable 
time, big coverage, 
low rates at. .. 



1070 KC 

BASIC 

MUTUAL 

The Friendly 
Voice of Indiana 



I Bid? and What's Offered?, on WOR- 
TV. Both operate the same way. Home 
and studio audience bid on attractive 
prizes like gas ranges, refrigerators, 
radios, luggage, watches. But the mer- 
chandising angle which makes these 
shows unusual is that instead of money, 
bidders must use tickets obtained from 
stores in the plan. 

Finally, sponsor found the disk 
jockeys moving into TV studios, too. 
On WTVN. Columbus, Jimmy Leeper 
and six telephone operators answer 
record requests. The hour-long week- 
day show includes guest interviews 
with celebrities. 

At WATV, Newark, Paul Brenner is 
expanding his activities to a TV stint 
called Dialing With Music. This am- 
bitious daytime show has music, guests, 
and calls viewers on the phone to ask 
questions. Questions are visual when- 
ever possible. The program is expected 
to spread out to five days soon. 

Clever planning is evident in many 
of the telephone gimmick shows spon- 
sor found on TV, but there is room 
for more good ones. Games seem 
slowest to get underway, yet parlor 
games for a mass audience could be a 
natural for TV. Harry S. Goodman, 
producer of the TV Telephone Game, 
has a Crossivord Puzzle program in 
which viewers work out puzzles at 
home, phone in when they've solved 
them. This is just one possibility. 

Whether on radio or TV, the tele- 
phone is the only direct link between 
broadcasters and their audience. Prop- 
erly handled, that link has been a very 
effective selling route. * * * 



BARN DANCES 

{Continued from page 22 I 

does not regard itself as a barn dance 
program, its entertainment is in the 
same simple, informal spirit. Each 
Saturday night, 5,000 persons flock to 
the broadcast show (8 p.m-12 mid- 
night) in Nashville's Ryman Audito- 
rium. Touring Opry acts have been 
seen by additional millions. By special 
request of the War Department, an 
Oprv troupe went to Europe in the fall 
of '49 to entertain military personnel. 
R. J. Reynolds (Prince Albert I . 
Opry sponsor for over a decade, in- 
vests in the NBC coast-to-coast pickup 
of the show 1 10:30-11:00 p.m.) . Other 
net sponsors want in. but the Reynolds 
"exclusive" prevents anyone but local 
sponsors from moving into the picture. 



48 



SPONSOR 



NOW— by transcription... 

this Sensational New Quarter-Hour Series! 



T 



THE ALL NEW 




31 JULY 1950 



49 



Mr. Philip Cohen 

Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles 

New York City 

Dear Phil: 

You agency fellers is alius lookin' 
fer brile spots. 
ain'tcha? Well, 
here's one yuh 
won't have ter 
polish! Charles- 
ton, West Vir- 
ginny, th' home 
t o W n u v 
WCI1S. is 
shore ashinin'! 
Why Phil, 
Kanaivhy Coun- 
ty alone has in- 
creased nearly 
30 percent in 
population since 
1940. an' th' 
o t h c r counties 
s e r v e d b v 
WCUS' 5000 
watts on 580 is 
really boomin , 
too. Add ter 
thet th' jack 
thet department 
store sales in 
Charleston is up 

20 percent o'er last year, an' yuh've 

got one uv th' brightest spots in th' 

whole dunied country! It'll pay yuh 

ter remember thet. Phil! 

Yrs. 




W C H S 
Charleston, W 



Algy 

. Va. 



SELL THE 
COTTON BELT 

WITH THE 
"COTTON BELT GROUP" 



WGVM 




GREENVILLE, MISS. 
1000 watts- 1260 Kc 

EL DORADO, ARK. 
1000 watts- 1290 Kc 

TEXARKANA, 
TEX.-ARK. 

250 watts-1400 Kc 



Sell over a million* folks in the Delta — 
South Arkansas and East Texas — by use 
of the Cotton Belt Group. One low rate 
gives you blanket "not secondary" cov- 
erage in this multi-million dollar mar- 
ket! 

•'Primary .5mv 



COTTON • OIL • LUMBER 
AGRICULTURE 

"The South's Billion $ Market" 

Write— Wire— Phono 
Cotton Belt Group 
c/o KTFS 
Texarkana, Tex. Ark. 



Other Opry sponsors include Purina 
Mills I over 10 years I , Stephens Mfg. 
Co., O'Brien Brothers, Royal Crown 
Cola and Warren Paint. 

Success stories by the hayrick are 
available from sponsors of such rustic 
funfests as KWKH's Louisiana Hay- 
ride ( Shreveport I , KMBCs Brush 
Creek Follies I Kansas City, Mo. ) ; 
WHO's Iowa Barn Dance Frolic I Des 
Moines) ; WRVA's Old Dominion 
Barn Dance (Richmond) ; the WWVA 
Jamboree Show i Wheeling ) , and 
scores of others. 

Single quarter hour particpations on 
WWVA's Jamboree have sold 2,703 
magazine subscriptions, 2,866 hosiery- 
orders, 973 sewing machine attach- 
ments, 787 plastic aprons. In 1949, 
this program pulled 73,765 pieces of 
commercial mail for its sponsors, 
which include Dr. LeGear I poultry 
medicine), Saf-Kil, Flex-0-Glass, Lex- 
ington Mail Order Company. 

The KWKH Louisiana Hayride has 
been selling everything from dough- 
nuts to automobiles for regional and 
local advertisers in the Southwest for 
ihree years. The Southern Maid 
Doughnut Company, using one 50- 
word announcement during the Hay- 
ride, found that the direct response, 
i.e., the big rush they got every Sat- 
urday night as soon as the show was 
over, more than justified the cost. The 
cumulative benefits were gravy. The 
owner of the Joe Lewis used car lot, 
Shreveport, sold 15 automobiles in one 
day. also as a direct result of one 50- 
word announcement on the show. One 
customer came from more than 300 
miles away. 

The Missouri Valley Barn Dance 
(WNAX. Yankton, S. D. ) has been 
sold out since its inception three years 
ago with Keystone Steel & Wire, Flex- 
O-Glass, Michigan Bulb among its 
sponsors. Current on this one-hour 
Saturday broadcast (8:30-9:30 p.m. I 
are Murphy Products and Sioux Steel. 

The "get out and meet the people" 
appearances of barn dance talent all 
year round at theaters, auditoriums, 
state and county fairs are a major rea- 
son for their artistic and sales success. 
The remote barriers of broadcasting 
are removed by these personal appear- 
ances; their keynote is an informal, 
sh i rtsleeve, j ust - stopped - by - for - a - visit 
atmosphere. Listeners are anxious to 
sec what their favorite artists rcall\ 
look like. Non-listeners acquire an in- 
terest in listening to the performers 




To SELL the PEOPLE Who Buy 
The MOST in the f^f/B 




*** 



0* 1 



POPULATION 
Over 4 Million 

RETAIL SALES 
Over 2 Billion 




Use 



v>\l\lll'l|/// . 

im\\\\iii/////^wfe 



4> 




BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



50 



SPONSOR 



they've seen. Typical of the popularity 
of these visits, the touring W\\\ 
Missouri Valley Barn Dance reports 
that demand for local appearances of 
the show is so great they have book- 
ings for one year in advance (at $1.25 
admission per person). 

Listeners tend to feel a real closeness 
to the barn dance entertainers, with 
their simple, neighborly, "meet-me-af- 
ler-the-show" informality. When the 
artists are scheduled to appear in va- 
rious places on personal appearance 
tours, they receive invitations galore t<> 
dinner from devoted fans along the 
route. Should a barn dance personalis 
be afflicted with a cold, or not look 
quite up to par, the intense personal 
interest and concern of the listeners is 
evidenced in an avalanche of anxious 
letters. This feeling of intimacy ex- 
presses itself in high listener loyalty. 

The amount of good will built for 
sponsors by these personal appear- 
ances is incalculable — and it's free! 
But that ain't all the sponsor gets. 
Nope, not by a ukelele. He reaps the 
benefit of recordings which most of his 
barn dance personalities make for the 
major record companies. Such outside 
activities have added new lustre to 
stars like Roy Acuff. Ernest Tubb. Red 
Foley, Cowboy Copas. Hank Williams 
of Grand Ole Opry, Eddy Arnold (ex- 
Opry ) and many others, whose disks 
have been outselling the usual pop rec- 
ords. For instance. Chatlanoogie Shoe 
Shine Boy, recorded by Red Foley for 
Decca I and written, incidentally. In 
two WSM executives ) has sold over 
1,000.000 copies from its Christmas- 
time release to date. 

Decca reports not only a tremendous 
increase in the sale of country-type 
records, but in the influence of this 
type of music on the field of pop. You 
have only to look at a list of recent 
juke box favorites to see the heavy 
sprinkling of hillbilly, folk and West- 
ern-flavored tunes. 

Swing, boogie-woogie and be-bop 
may come and go. but the barn dance 
stays on, safely ensconced in Ameri- 
ca's heart. Its basic appeal was summed 
up some years ago by H. S. Thomp- 
son, advertising manager of Miles Lab- 
oratories, when Alka Seltzer had just 
zoomed to success: "After all, the ma- 
jority of us are just plain folks. We 
like the man who is informal and 
friendly. We like the man who takes 
us by the hand and calls us by our first 
name." * -A- * 



.10.000 WATTS COVERING 

A I7.000.000 

POi'lTLA TIOX AREA ! 




The DETROIT Area's Greater Buy! 

— at the lowest rate of any major 

station in this region! 



CKLW with 50,000 watt power is hitting an 
audience of 17,000,000 people in a 5 state 
region and establishing new performance 
records for advertisers. This mighty power, 
coupled with the LOWEST RATE OF ANY 
MAJOR STATION IN THIS REGION 
means that you get more for every dollar you 
spend in this area when you use CKLW. Get 
the facts! — plan your Fall schedule on 
CKLW now! 



CKLW 



Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 
National Ile[>. 



J. E. ( AMI'! U 

President 



Guardian Building • Detroit 28 



31 JULY 1950 



51 



GROWING 

GROWING 

GROWN 



MORNING PERIOD' 



PLUS... 

a 14.8 Over-all Audience 
Increase Since 1949 

ANOTHER BONUS 
FOR ADVERTISERS... 

Special merchandising 
department for extra 
promotion of sales. 

•January, February, 1950 Hooper 

\|f ADD AM 5.000 Watts 
flHDD FM 50,000 Watts 

AMERICAN BROADCASTING 
COMPANY 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
THE MOBILE PRESS REGISTER 

NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY 
THE BRANHAM COMPANY 




KQV was the only Pittsburgh 
station on the scene during 
a recent headline-making 
probe in Pittsburgh. The 
hearings involved free work 
by employees on city time. 
KQV made tape-recordings 
of all essential testimony to 
give its listeners first hand 
service on the town's biggest 
political story in years. 



KQV 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MBS — 5,000 Watts - 1410 



WHAT MEDIA WITH TV? 

(Continued from page 31) 

families subscribing. But average cov- 
erage of the Post-Dispatch in all coun- 
ties in the "outside" area is only 7.4% 
(source: Audit Bureau of Circulation, 
September 1949). 

A 50 kw outlet has been used in this 
comparison, which is based on a study 
of "outside" markets by CBS market 
researcher E. P. J. Shurick. But the 
same kind of circulation comparisons 
are possible for less extensive "out- 
side" markets covered by lower-power 
radio stations, though not necessarily 
with equally sensational results in 
every case. 

Assume that an advertiser is using 
network radio plus some combination 
of printed media as shown in one of 
the charts accompanying this story. 
He plans to add network television. 
Where can he squeeze money from his 
current budget to help pay for tele- 
vision without sacrificing essential 
"outside market" coverage? 

Coverage figures shown in the chart 
for the St. Louis sample area illustrate 
the relatively overwhelming "outside" 
coverage of 50 kw KMOX as compared 
with all or any combination of the 
printed media shown. From these 
analyses two conclusions emerge: (1) 
your TV money can come from printed 
media with minimum loss of "outside 
market" coverage; (2) stepped-up ad- 
vertising pressure via television should 
in many cases be balanced by addi- 
tional radio pressure. Cutting back 
certain magazines, as illustrated in the 
chart just mentioned, makes this pos- 
sible. As an example, the cost of full- 
page insertions in the magazines 
shown as "omitted" approximately 
equals the cost of a half-hour network 
nighttime program heard over KMOX. 

The illustration used does not as- 
sume that an advertiser would be using 
all the printed media shown in the ex- 
ample chart. Network radio adver- 
tisers might be using one or more of 
these printed media on some kind of a 
staggered basis. Smaller advertisers 
may object that network radio is too 
costly because it has to be used on a 
continuous basis. Network radio is 
flexible. You can buy one-shot broad- 
cast in any open time available, and 
some of the top advertisers have. * * * 



FURS ON THE AIR 

(Continued from page 33) 

For example. Davidson Brothers In- 
diana Fur Company in Indianapolis 
recently featured a low-priced garment 
over their WFBM-TV program. The 
item was sold out after the first pro- 
gram. Following a Kathi Norris TV 
show over WABD in New York, three 
coats ($300 each) were sold by Sachs 
Quality Clothes within 90 minutes. 

The feeling among these top-notch- 
ers is well stated by Robert Ross, ad- 
vertising manager of the Evans Fur 
Company. Chicago: "Radio has always 
played an important role in our sales 
picture. As an instrument of promo- 
tion, it has proven to be most effec- 
tive, and though we are finding tele- 
vision growing in importance, radio 
will always be carefully considered in 
our budget thinking." It is estimated 
that Evans spends over $100,000 year- 
ly on several local stations, uses Jim 
Ameche transcribed, locally produced 
shows, announcements, foreign lan- 
guage programs, quiz and giveaway 



WAVE 
WON'T 
SETTLE IN 
REDWjNE 

(Ky.)I 

a «r room tern- 

Chitted, X m p e e 0p le of Refine 
perature, the peop 

^ Cint C,S«l b e P lumb 

things.- • • • wny, ived 

mu9 ty before vre a ^ 

Instead, we "g-gS-' fab " 

ulous te r " to ^ rin8 tance,people 
with money, tor ^^ r 

here invest »ll in t he 

stjs**. portion9 




52 



SPONSOR 



shows. They've used practically every 
Chicago station in the past 20 vears. 

Davidson's, one of Indiana's oldest 
and largest fur companies, spends 
nearly $50,000 a }ear on radio and 
TV. In addition to a unique 15-minute 
TV show. Davidsons purchases fur 
storage announcements five nights per 
week, both over WFBM-TV, India- 
napolis. On the 15-minute Paradise 
Island TV show the following effective 
technique is employed: The program 
begins with "Davidson's Indiana Fur 
Company presents.' followed by the 
start of a movie lone of pleasant back- 
ground scenes). The movie is stopped 
at the point where identically painted 
scenery, previously created, is placed 
in focus. Live models then walk into 
the scene. They consistently use two 
or three radio stations, announcements 
and musical programs, to air "fashions 
of tomorrow." 

According to the Canadian Fur 
Corporation in New York and Newark, 
their business is constant]) increasing. 
When the firm celebrates its 35th an- 






SELL 



CLOTHING! 




LANG-WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS, Inc. 

113 W. 57th ST.. NEW YORK 19. N. Y. 



Network Calibre Programs at Cecal Station Cost 



niversary this year they will have in- 
vested well over $1,000,000 in radio. 
More than $100,000 was spent last 
year. The) began their radio in 1934 
wild Martin Block over WNEW, New 
York: still use him on the Make Be- 
lieve Ballroom. \l one time or an- 
other, the companv has been on all 
local stations in the New York area; 
and radio has always been one of their 
basic media. It gets approximate!) 
.-)()', of the ad budget in New York. 
Last vear the\ used programs, an- 
nouncements, jingles, and straight 
commercials on three stations — 
WNFW and WHOM. New York: 
WAAT. Newark. At times WNFW 
beamed 70 announcements per week. 
Except for a short hiatus in July. Ca- 
nadian stays on year-round. Though 
nut yet in TV, the compan) contem- 
plates using it tliis year; perhaps as 
early as this fall. 

The Ben Tucker Hudson Bay Fur 
Companv knows, to the customer, how 
effective its radio has been. Says Ben 
Tucker, owner of the company and 
president of the Metropolitan Fur Re- 
tailers Association of New York. "From 
August to March, we ask each cus- 
tomer who enters our store how he 
happened to come in. We use a spe- 
cial card system for this; and have 
found that a majority of customers 
came from our radio advertising." 
I ucker estimates that radio has in- 
creased his business more than 50'/£ 
since 1940. The company is on year- 
round, airs about 18 announcements a 
day plus four 15-minute shows per 
week, all on WINS. They are cur- 
rentl) spending over $100,000 for 
radio, by far their basic medium. 
Ben Tucker, like Canadian, appeals to 
the masses, and contemplates the use 
of TV in the near future. 

Whether or not the industry decline 
has reached the point of survival of 
the fittest isn't yet certain. But its ap- 
parent that the fittest, the well-organ- 
ized outfits, are reaping a harvest dur- 
ing this era of high family income. 
Planned long-term advertising and 
promotional campaigns are paying off. 

But planning isn't easy. Business is 
highly seasonable, and is greatly de- 
pendent upon weather conditions. De- 
partment stores appear to be in the 
best position to handle the unpredicta- 
ble factors. Advertising plans and 
budgets for fur departments are usual- 
ly well organized, as is the depart- 
mental structure ol the average depart- 
ment store itself. In addition, the de- 



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31 JULY 1950 



53 




The Spirit of Memphis Quartet, an- 
other good reason for WDIA leading 
all the nation's independents in share 
of audience April-May 1950, in Hooper 
Radio Audience cities; why WDIA 
has one-third more daytime listeners 
Mon.-Fri. than any other Memphis 
station (see below) ; why these adver- 
tisers* buy and renew: 

•Swift & Co. "Upton's Tea 

"Grennan Cakes Cook Kill 

'Nucoa *Stokely-Van Camp 

HOOPER RAOIO AUDIENCE INDEX 
City: Memphis, Tenn. May-June 195(1 

Time SetsWDIA A B C D E F 

M-F8AM-6PM 18.8 25.6 19.0 17.8 15.7 9.9 6.2 4.9 

"WDIA, Memphis, Tennessee, Bert 
Ferguson, Mngr., Harold Walker, 
Com'l Mngr., John E. Pearson, Rep." 




«fe*" 





COMPLETE 
COVERAGE 

Of Houston's entire mar- 
ket area from KATL's full- 
time 5 Kw. operation. 
And, too, the experienced 
"Know How" from 33 
hard working "Cattle" 
broadcasters. 




HOUSTON, TEXAS 



partment store can more readily carry 
an adequate inventory, and buy and 
sell on volume terms. Macy's, for ex- 
ample, makes it as easy as possible for 
the buying customer, will announce 
tremendous sales with easy payment 
plans. 

Department stores and specialtv 
stores account for about four-fifths of 
all the furs sold. Independent retail 
furriers sell no more than 20% of the 
total. The three ( department stores, 
specialty stores and independent retail 
furriers ) are the main fur outlets in 
the nation; together number about 
13,820. 

According to a recent survey made 
by MacFadden Publications, Inc., 
1 1 ' i of all wage-earner wives own fur 
coats. More women in the 30 to 40 
age group own fur coats than any 
other; only 18% of those over 45 
own one. The survey revealed that 
37$ of the women who owned fur 
coats bought them since 1946; 37% 
bought their furs between 1942 and 
1945. Only 11.2 r ^ of the coats bought 
cost over $400. According to the sur- 
vey, only 2.4% of the women plan to 
buy a fur coat within the year; and 
81% expect to pay less than $300. 

August is the most highly promoted 
month among the three groups. The 
top month is December; the lowest is 
June (note chart). Retailers with fa- 
cilities attempt to maintain income 
during the seasonal lows with fur serv- 
icing departments. Cleaning, repair- 
ing, storage and remodeling are be- 
coming increasingly important, have 
accounted for substantial profits. One 
of the best known in this field is the 
Hollander Company which successfully 
promotes servicing. Hollander ran a 
TV program for seven weeks ending in 
June which featured Wendy Barrie 
over WNBT from 10:45 to 11:00 p.m., 
and plugged fur cleaning and rejuve- 
nation. No other advertising was done 
during this period. They spent $12,000 
for time and talent. Result: figures in 
the New York market spurted far 
ahead of all other markets. 

The Certified Cold Fur Storage As- 
sociation in Kansas City, Missouri ac- 
tively promotes the use of cold storage 
for fur preservation. A complete ad- 
vertising and promotion kit is avail- 
able to its 229 members. The kit. 
built around the theme "Time to Store 
Your Furs," contains spot radio sug- 
gestions, direct mail pieces, car cards, 
decals, and displays. 

Sully's Furs in Detroit, on the air 



52 weeks a year, illustrates the retailer 
who capitalizes on fur servicing during 
the off months. During May, June and 
part of July. Sully's broadcasts a Fur 
Facts and Fashions program on 
WKMH in Detroit. The show is spon- 
sored solely to stress the advantages 
of storing furs, the importance of prop- 
er care and treatment. 

Consistency in advertising has key- 
noted the major successes. In addition 
to those mentioned, scores of others 
have practically built their businesses 
on the use of radio. The American Fur 
Company has stayed with radio since 
1933 over KSL in Salt Lake. The spon- 
sor is so firmly convinced of its value 
that he has taken steps to have the 
schedule protected in his "Use and Oc- 
cupancy" insurance policy. If his 
store should be closed because of fire 
or other calamity, his KSL schedule 
would continue and be paid for by 
the insurance company. 

Kussell Furriers in Boston is quick 
to give radio full credit for their suc- 
cessful fur business. It was 23 years 
ago that Kussell's decided to drop all 
newspaper ,magazine and direct mail 
advertising, and concentrate on radio. 
Not only has the firm carried this out, 
but it has used the same program, 
Caroline Cabot's Shopping Service, 
for the same number of years over 
WEEI, Boston. Furriers like I. J. Fox 
in New York admit that radio played 
an important part in their substantial 
growth. Duplers in Denver, and Zlot- 
nick's in Washington, are prime ex- 
amples of successful organized plan- 
ning; both have used radio extensive- 

iy- 

Most of the companies noted, plus 
many others, use transcriptions. Dup- 
ler's bought 39 Harry Goodman tran- 
scriptions last year, at a cost of $20 
each. Goodman reports over 200 users 
of fur transcriptions; World reports 
approximately 150. Both list sponsor- 
ship of shows as well as short an- 
nouncements. Jingles have come in 
for widespread usage. Music library 
scripted programs are used extensive- 
ly by many furriers. 



V. S. BECKER PRODUCTIONS 
AVAILABLE 

Women's appeal, musicals, serials, dramas, 
comedies and children's shows completely 
packaged for television. Representing talent. 
562 - 5th Ave.. N. Y. Luxemberg 2-1040 



. 



54 



SPONSOR 



But, by and large, the industry is in 
a bad way. Sales are down; unity is 
lacking; promotion is poor. The little 
promotion that is being done falls on 
the shoulders of the retailers. As a 
whole, they aren't bearing their bur- 
den well. It isn't as if the task can't 
be done; a few are doing it and stay- 
ing on top. The wailers are in a slump. 
with no sound planning or national 
guidance to get them out. 

There is no rule that says promotion 
has to fall exclusively to the retailers. 
The industry is not necessarily scat- 
tered; most of the manufacturers are 
located in New York, some 3,000 of 
them. Over a third of the mink farms 
are centralized in Wisconsin and Min- 
nesota; 57% of the silver fox farms 
are located in Wisconsin. The industry 
appears to be structurally conducive to 
organization. If the levels of produc- 
tion (breeders, dealers, manufacturers, 
dressers and dyers, etc.) would do 
their part, if retailers would decide to 
get expert advertising advice and al- 
locate funds to do a long-range job, 
the fur industry might discover that 
times are only what you make them, 
after all. • • • 



Is your station in the black? 
Are you satisfied with your 
profit statement? Radio 
competition today requires 
intelligent sales effort by 
management! 

I have a successful back- 
ground of profitable sta- 
tion operation, including 
self-owned and managed 
major market station. 

If you own an east coast 
station — network or inde- 
pendent — in a metropoli- 
tan market and interested 
in good management and 
increased profits, write to 
Box 8, 

SPONSOR 

510 Madison Avenue 

New York 22, N. Y. 



MEDIA MICROSCOPE 

{Continued from page 25) 

newspaper research tell whether West- 
brook Pegler was read l>\ the same 
number of people this week as last? 
Wading tli rough all the claims and 
counterclaims made by radio stations 
and networks was hard enough for 
sponsors. Now it looks as though tele- 
vision may well be the final straw. Be- 
cause it, too, is an electronic medium, 
researchers have neatly bundled TV 
and radio together. It is easy to fall 
into the dangerous habit of imagining 
that each minute spent with television 
automatically steals a minute from ra- 
dio. As Sindlinger and others have 
shown, TV is in competition on its 
own with every human activity. There 
is no such thing as a rigid "entertain- 
ment by electronics" period during the 
day. 

Broadcasters themselves have suc- 
cumbed to this fallacy, with the result 
that they spend too much time squab- 
bling over ratings. As station time 
salesmen on the firing line all over the 
country will readily admit, local ad- 
vertisers need selling on radio's effec- 
tiveness as a medium. Instead they get 
bewildering displays of ratings, share 
of audience figures, sets in use, cover- 
age data. The poor local advertiser 
throws up his hands after the third 
station in that market gives him the 
same sales pitch but the third distinct 
set of figures. His reaction to all the 
minute data so expensively gathered: 
"all I know is the newspaper guaran- 
tees me 100.000 circulation. I'll buy 
that." 

How much more effective radio (or 
TV) sales would be if its salesmen 
could present, as a basic presentation, 
one simple bar graph to the advertiser. 
It would include the minutes in a day 
devoted to each medium by a sample 
of that market. This and the rates 
would be the determining factors. At 
last there would be a common denom- 
inator in the media equation. 

Acceptance of a time scale to meas- 
ure media will not eliminate all the 
problems that advertisers face, but it 
will greatly reduce the present con- 
fusion. Until some such device is 
adopted, all parties should at least 
recognize that they are not measuring 
with equal accuracy when they com- 
pare radio and printed media for ef- 
fectiveness. Radio and TV are under 
the microscope — alone. * * * 



MORE THAN 

A MILLION 

Letters and cards have 

proven that men and women 
like to listen to 

TOM DICK and HARRY 

A new show (156 15-min. variety 
programs) starring these three 
zanies is now available at low 
cost from 

TELEWAYS 

RADIO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

8949 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 46, Calif. 
Phone CRestview 67238 — BRadshaw 21447 



: 



Other top TELEWAYS transcribed 
program availabilities are: 

• RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 
156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 
156 15-Min. Hymn Programs 

• STRANGE WILLS 

26 30-Min. Dramatic Programs 



Send for Free Audition Platter and low rates 



ask 

John Blair & Co. 

about the 

II W1\N & MW 

STATIONS 

IN 

RICHMOND 

MOD-™ 
WTVR-*v 

First Stations of Virginia 



31 JULY 1950 



55 




Johnny Cillin 

I he broadcasting industry lost one 
ol its best-loved figures when John J. 
Cillin. president and general manager 
of WOW and WOW-TV. Omaha, 
passed on 19 Jul\ . 

Of all U. S. broadcasters, Johnny 
Cillin was probably best known and 
admired in Canada, and for years has 
attended the annual CAB Conventions 
as an unofficial ambassador. 

Johnny was an ardent exponent of 
good broadcasting practices. He be- 
lieved that "the program's the thing" 
and demonstrated it over his radio and 
TV stations. He worked selflessly for 
civic and industry projects, and for 



14 years was a member of the NAB 
Board. 

His unfailing courtesy and kindness 
won't soon be forgotten. Johnny will 

be remembered when broadcasters get 
together. 

Howdy, neighbor 

There s no quicker wa\ to discover 
yourself and your product a friend of 
the familj than to buy a portion of a 
barn dance. 

It doesn't matter whose barn dance. 
providing it's the real stuff — not the 
synthetic variety. 

As soon as you buy in you'll discov- 
that "howdy, neighbor are more than 
a couple of words. You occupy a spe- 
cial niche with the Saturday night reg- 
ulars; you belong. And a word to the 
program director will push your prod- 
uct slambang into the fun. frolic, and 
general good clean commotion that's 
part and parcel of the shindig. 

The fellow who's writing this edi- 
torial knows. For 204 consecutive 
Saturday nights he served as sound 
effects man. sign putter-outer, general 
factotum on one of the nation's big 
barn dances. Why. once or twice he 
was even mistaken for a performer. 

sponsor tells what barn dance spon- 
sorship can do for you on page 19. 
But here's the big hitch — how to get 
on. We hear that most all of them are 
darn nigh sold out. 



Media yardstick 

An advertiser is entitled to know 
what he's buying, and to decide wheth- 
er he's paying a fair price. 

So the current inquiries of the ANA 
are certainly in order. 

But to make the investigation valid, 
one thing is needed. That's a single 
yardstick for measuring all the adver- 
tising media — otherwise how can you 
compare values? 

The rating confusion in the radio 
field, now extending into television, is 
reaching the chaotic state. Adver- 
tisers and agencies are peering micro- 
scopically at the air media via BMB. 
Nielsen. Hooper, Pulse, American Re- 
search Bureau. Conlan. Sindlinger. 
Videodex, and what have you. The 
more they peer the more confused they 
become. In the end, more than one 
advertiser has decided to stay with 
something simple, like newspapers. 

And what could be simpler than 
analyzing newspapers. All you ask is 
circulation and maybe a breakdown 
of where the copies go. Occasionally 
you look at the Continuing Study of 
Newspaper Reading. 

Why ask to see radio through a 
microscope; newspapers at a distance 
of 100 yards? Wouldn't a common 
denominator yardstick be fairer? 

sponsor suggests one such yardstick 
in this issue. Please turn to page 24. 



Applause 



Mitch's pitch 

When the word went out that 
Maurice B. Mitchell, director of the 
Broadcast Advertising Bureau, was 
going over to NBC on 15 August, sta- 
tion managers and sales managers let 
out a wail that could be heard from 
coast to coast. 

Typical was the telegram by Paul 
G. White, general manager of WEIR. 
Weirton, W. Va.: "Urge you exert all 
-upport sponsor magazine to influence 
Mitchell reconsider resignation. Wired 
N \B directors today to rouse member- 
ship to organize concerted drive 
against resignation." 

Mitch bows out of the BAB. re- 
luctantly, alter 15 months of hustling. 
speech-making, planning, selling, and 



56 



promoting that would make a whirling 
dervish seem to be standing still in 
comparison. One day he was in 
Georgia; the next in Minnesota. On 
Saturdays and Sundays he handled the 
load of dictation and sundries that had 
accumulated during the working week. 
He wrote his never-ending brochures, 
slide films, presentations at home; 
read proof on the run. And. with it 
all, he was never too busy to take time 
out when you called. 

It was apparent that Mitch loved the 
BAB . . . and though some may not 
believe this, in light of his departure, 
still docs. He believes that through it 
sponsors and agencies will recognize 
radio and TV for what they are, the 
greatest of all sales-producing advertis- 
ing media. He hopes that his leaving 



will point up the hopelessness of doing 
a $1,000,000 job with a $200,000 
budget; the importance of making 
BAB available to all segments of the 
broadcast industry. NAB members or 
not: the impossibility of helping boost 
broadcast advertising revenue to where 
it should be with a handful of person- 
nel. 

He leaves this message: "Why 
doesn't the NAB Board keep the mem- 
bership more closely informed regard- 
ing the BAB? If BAB does a job now. 
it can do a bigger one, but it takes 
station support. How big does the 
membership want BAB to be?" 

Mitch gave unstintingly, unselfishly 
of himself at the BAB. Wherever he 
is, nothing will make him happier than 
a bigger, better BAB after he's gone. 

SPONSOR 






THE KANSAS CITY MARKET 

Does Mot Run m O'rc/es/ 



_-^^» ■■iCite 



"*• 




ond Only The KMBC-KFRM Team 



Covers It Effectively 
and Economically! 



Is The Team's great potential audience respon- 
sive, you may ask? 

Last year the program "Rhymaline Time" alone- 
broadcast each weekday morning 7:30 to 8:15 — 
pulled 24,082 responses. 22,892 of these cards 
and letters came from the Kansas City Primary 
Trade Area (shown in red) representing all 
but 8 counties within The Team's half-millivolt 
daytime contours. 



Daytime half-millivoli contours shown in black. 

Currently the response is running even greater, 
with the lusty two-year old KFRM pulling 35%. 

The Conlan 1950 Spring KFRM Area Survey 
proves that The Team retained first place among 
all broadcasters serving the area, and leads the 
closest Kansas City competitor 5 to 1. 

To examine this proof, contact KMBC-KFRM, 
or any Free & Peters "Colonel". 




BC-KFR 



6TH OLDEST CBS AFFILIATE 



PROGRAMMED BY KMBC 



in summ 



More advertisers are sponsoring more programs on CBS 
er network - 18% more than last summer 







,One, 



ast season. 5 of the "top 20" shows were CBS-conceived. CBS produced: 
Talent Scouts, My Friend Irma. Suspense, Crime Photographer, Luigi. 




to® of© 
[of o|© 

»§©|8 

fi ** & " 




IK* 2© 






I 
I 



i 



rofirrams 



^^^ types and sizes: comedy, variety, dran 



\\\ 



14 AUGUST 1950 



$8.00 a Year 



) E I V E 

UG 141S50 

What agencies say 




j&t?***'^ 




NO FLYING 
SAUCERS 
IN 
RICHMOND 

Military men often achieve 

their objectives with secret weapons. 

This is not true with advertising men. 

Broadcast sales strategy, in particular, 

calls for heads-up use of a time-tested media. 

The Havens and Martin stations, for example, 
have a unique record of sales achievements 
in Richmond, the first market of Virginia. 

Long years of experience in radio and television 
have won for VVMBG, VVCOD, and VV7VR 
the confidence and loyalty of Richmond's populous 
and prosperous market. 

You can't overlook these result-producing 
facilities in planning your fall and winter campaign. 
Ask your nearest Blair man for the facts. 



Havens & Martin Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 




WMBG 
WTVR 
WCOD 



FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 



Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
Represented nationally by 
John Blair & Company. 



TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



Utilities aren't 

radio/TV ad 

conscious 



Should advertising 
drop in wartime? 



Ohio high schools 

favor no-charge 

policy for radio 

sports rights 



FCC extends time 

for Phonevision 

test 



How radio 

merchandising 

compares with 

newspapers 



14 August 1950 

Only 7.9g of the 1949 public utility advert i sing dollar goe s t o radio 
and TV, reports Public Utilities Advertising Association. But 38.50 
go toward newspaper space and production. Outdoor gets 50; direct 
mail 3.20. Appliance sales will get about 20% of total budget of 147 
reporting companies in 1950; institutional advertising 34%; promotion- 
al campaigns 46%. Only 0.64% of gross revenue was devoted to adver- 
tising in 1949. Poor showing of radio/TV believed due to tradition 
and lack of concerted sales effort by broadcast sellers. 

-SR- 
Current crisis, with conversion threat, turns spotlight on famous Sat- 
urday Evening Post advertising study made after World War One. Survey 
revealed that cost of regaining ground lost competitively by non-ad- 
vertising firms during the war was $3.00 for every $1.00 that would 
have been required to hold position. 

-SR- 
After presentation by committee of alert Ohio Broadcasters' Associa- 
tion, Ohio High School Athletic Association Board of Directors adopted 
resolution urging all Ohio high schools to welcome broadcast coverage 
of sports events without charge t o station or sponsor. 0BA, headed 
by Carl George, WGAR, Cleveland, also sparking drive to promote radio 
via radio. Robert Fehlman, WHBC, Canton, was chairman of committee 
appearing before athletic association. Committtee included Tom 
Rogers, WCLT, Gene Trace, WBBW, Joe True, WM0H. 

-SR- 
Phonevision test in Chicago, slated for late summer, can begin late as 
1 October by permission of FCC. Zenith difficulties in obtaining 
first run A pictures is one reason for postponement of subscription 
TV plan. Hollywood continues worried over ultimate outcome of Phone- 
vision tests; is absorbed with ways to compete in TV era. 

-SR- 
N either radio stations nor newspap e rs have any standard gauge for kind 
or amount of merchandising made available to advertisers, SPONSOR sur- 
vey discloses. Some build around merchandising; others don't give 
any. Study (to appear in two parts starting 28 August issue) points 
out that newspapers are no more merchandising-conscious than radio 
stations, contrary to common belief. 



On reprints of SPONSOR articles and excerpts 

Because of numerous inquiries, SPONSOR herewith gives its policy on reproduc- 
tion of its copyrighted material. SPONSOR articles, or excerpts from arti- 
cles, may not be reproduced without written permission. Requests for author- 
ization should be addressed to Editor, Sponsor Publications Inc., 510 Madison 
Avenue, New York 22. When SPONSOR is quoted the source must be indicated. 



SPONSOR. Volume 4. No. 17, H August 1930. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publicitions Inc.. at 3110 Elm Are.. Baltimore 11. Md. Executive. Editorial, Circulation Office 
510 Madison Ave.. New York 22. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postoflice under Act 8 March 1879. 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR Rl 



Detailed FM map 

gives statistics 

on medium 



Television Digest 
'Factbook" tells all 



Three TV rep In move to establish spo t TV as film-program factor competitive to 
firms join to sell networks, Blair-TV, Free & Peters, and the Katz Agency are collaborat- 

film programs ing in optioning top film properties as offerings for national adver- 
ti sers. Combined force of 45 TV salesmen in 22 offices will sell pro- 
grams. First availability is "Sherlock Holmes," optioned from Dryer 
& Weenolsen Productions. Second is "Shadows of the Mind", psychologi- 
cal mystery-thriller being filmed in England. Three firms partici- 
pating have only one competitive situation among 31 stations they 
represent, will extend plan to stations handled by other rep firms as 
client requires. Coordinating committee includes Edward Codel, Katz 
Agency; Wells H. Barnett Jr., Blair-TV; Jack Brooke, Free & Peters. 

-SR- 

"1950 Census of Frequency Modul a tion" is title of large statistical 
map produced by Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexington Avenue, New 
York 17. U. S. map shows pattern of FM coverage ; features number of 
FM vs. AM stations heard without objectionable noise or fading in 
specified test areas. Map reveals 7,000,000 FM receivers in use in 
160 of leading 200 retail markets. 

-SR- 

D etailed rate cards of 106 TV stations and four nets, together with 
other v i tal statistics, are contained in Television Rates & Factbook 
publ is hed by Television Digest, 15 1 9 Connecticut Ave., Washington, 
D. C. Some 460 film firms, 100 TV set manufacturers, 350 frozen TV 
applications are identified in the 104 page edition. 

-SR- 

Check of ad agencies reveals more t han one juicy appropriation lost to 
radio due to complicated, confused au di ence rating picture. With 
Hooper, Pulse, Conlan, American Research Bureau, Sindlinger and others 
all in on local rating (each with variations in rating technique), 
sponsor and agency can't be blamed for throwing up hands. Buyers 
would welcome standard basis for comparing media. San Francisco test 
of Hooper vs. Pulse validity urged by Stanley Breyer,KJBS, attracting 
wide interest. But all researchers queried by SPONSOR, including some 
agreeing to help arrange test, insist test can't be done. Maybe AAAA 
and ANA should decide standard method of determining all media rat- 
ings, additionally specifying techniques for station and program rat- 
ings, then insist on compliance or else. 

-SR- 

Rep firm sells New Kettell-Carter , Boston representat iv e firm, has organized all its sta- 
Engiand stations tions under single rate card and single name (North Eastern Broadcast- 
with single rate card ing S yst em) for group selling. Its first sale is already in. 

-SR- 

TV freeze With NBC-TV and CBS-TV virtually sold out this fall, DuMont and ABC 
handcuffs probably could sell every available period t wice over if stations 
advertisers could be cleared. With only 106 operating TV stations (WSM-TV will be 
107th soon) supply doesn't equal demand. Some net advertisers demand- 
ing minimum of five stations can't be accommodated. 

Please turn to page 44- 

2 SPONSOR 



That muddled 
rating picture 



NO. 14 OF A SERIES 





HARRY STOVEY 
In Stolen Buses, — 

WHEC 
In Rochester 



iOHG Tl** . 



leAOBRSMIP 



WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 
Note WHEC's leadership morning, afternoon, evening: 



STATION STATION STATION STATION STATION 

WHEC B C D E 

MORNING 43.9 17.2 9.6 6.6 17.8 



8:00-12:00 Noon 
Monday through F ri. 

AFTERNOON 38.2 24.8 

12:00-6:00 P.M. 
Monday through Fri. 

EVENING 

6:00-10:30 P.M. 
Sunday through Sat. 



7.9 



15.2 



9.6 



40.6 27.7 8.0 9.6 12.9 

WINTER-SPRING 1949-1950 



F 

3.1 
2.8 



Station 

Broad casts 

till Sunset 

Only 



HOOPERATING 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 





N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT- McKINNEY, Inc. New York, Chicago, LEE F. O'CONNELL CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco, 



14 AUGUST 1950 




Vol 4 no. 17 



14 August 1950 




^FEATURES 

, & ; ' , , . 



.Sponsor Reports 

.710 Muiliswn 

New ami He new 

Mr. Sponsor: 

Alexuniler Harris 

Queries 

P. S. 

.fir. Sponsor Asks 

Roundup 

TV Results 

Sponsor Speaks 

Applause 



1 

6 

11 

14 
16 
17 
36 
38 
40 
04 
64 



(over is portrait of four Shell ad-men and 
some of their proudest accomplishments: 
merchandising posters which they consider 
vital for success of Shell news programs. 
At top of ladder (actually and figurative- 
ly) is advertising dept. manager, D. C. 
Marschner; below him is C. W. Shugert, 
his assistant and media director; to his 
left, E. W. Lier, media representative; far 
left, John Heiney, their radio contact man 
from J. Walter Thompson. (See story 
page 22.) 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 
Managing Editor: Miles David 
Senior Editors: F-ank M. Bannister, Erik H. 

Arctander 
Assistant Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Arnold A!- 

pert, Li!a Lederman, J. Liener Temerlin 
Art Director: Howard Wechsler 
Vice-President — Advertising: Norman Knight 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 

(West Coast Manager), George Weiss 

(Southern Representative), Edna Yergin, 

John Kovchok 

Vice-President — Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Promotion Manager: M. H. LeBlang 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Jacque- 
line Parera 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 
INC. Executive. Editorial, Circulation, and Advertising 
Offices: 510 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray 111 II 8-2772. Chicago Office: 360 N. 
Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Financial 1556. West 
Coast Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Los Angeles 
Telephone: Hillside 8311. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: United States 
iH a year. Canada and foreign $0. Single copies SOc. 
Printed In U. S. A. Address all correspondence to 510 
Madison Avenue. New York 22, N. Y. Copyright 1850 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



ARTICLES 



What ugeney men u'oulil tell sponsors — if they dared 

Many advertisers may be surprised to learn what their agency men really think 
of them with respect to their working relationship 



How to keep your dealer happy 

Shell Oil's successful formula consists of spot newscasts and sportscasts, strong- 
ly peppered with guided merchandising 



How moppets hypo adult viewiny 

Evidence is growing that evening tuning-in to TV by adults is strongly influ- 
enced by the presence of children in the home 



This team bats .500 in sales 

A combination of air and free-home-demonstration selling has been moving 
TV sets by the carload for dealers 



The Negro rf.j. strikes it rich 

Sepia air personalities on stations across the nation are cashing in for sponsors 
in hitherto almost untapped Negro markets 



Radio is getting bigger 

Studies of radio impact show there are more radio homes, more individual 
listening, less cost per thousand than ever before 



Station merehamlising for advertisers 

What advertisers expect in the way of station promotion on the retail level 
and what the stations are willing to give them will be sketched here 

Retail tlrug store advertising 

SPONSOR presents the current picture of what drug stores throughout the 
nation are doing on radio and television 



SPONSOR INDEX: JANUARY- JUNE 1950 

The next issue of SPONSOR will contain a complete index to articles appear- 
ing in the first six months of 1950. It will be broken down by product cata- 
gories, and generic topics such as "research," "timebuying," "transcription." 
Henceforth, indexes will appear twice yearly. 



19 



22 



24 



26 



2it 



30 



IN FUTURE ISSUES 
What sponsors say about their ageneies 

Part two of a SPONSOR investigation into advertiser-agency relationships n» « 

includes frank revelations from the sponsors' corner "~ -'■""• 



28 Aug. 



28 Aug. 



28 Aug. 




COME ON IN • 

THE MARKETS FINE! 

The San Diego Market, that is! 



Retail Sales $729,000,000 
Industrial Payrolls $66,000,000 
Navy Payroll $97,000,000 
Farm Products $57,000,000 
World's largest tuna port 
Increase in Retail Sales 434% 
since 1940 





IN 



FACT 



• • • 



■*-■ 






San Diego — the 
nation's 26th 

market in population — has the high- 
est Retail Sales Index of any U. S. 
city in the first 40.** 

YES, THE SAN DIEGO MARKET'S 
FINE ... AND GETTING FINER 

And Remember 



KCBQ— CBS is the only San Diego network 
station to increase in over-all Share-of-Audi- 
ence during 1949, with all other network 
affiliates taking a nosedive! 

Local and national spot advertisers buy more 
programs on KCBQ — CBS than on any two 
other San Diego network stations combined! 



So when in San Diego ... do as San Diegans do .' . / 
«£& SELL WITH KCBQ 




*S. D. Chamber of Commerce 
"S.R.D.S. Consumer Markets 1949-1950 




Charles E. Salik, President 5000 WA1 TS 



CBS 



14 AUGUST 1950 



IOWA-NEBRASKA 

SALES 

are made by . . . 



KMA Audience 
Impact- 
Impact in 140 rural counties of 
Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri and 
Kansas, — that's what KMA, 
Shenandoah, Iowa, offers. 

KMA Programming 

Experience 

25 years of broadcasting ex- 
perience means KMA com- 
pletely covers the rich rural 
Omaha-Des Moines market 
with programs farm and small- 
town dwellers like to hear. 

KMA Merchandising 
Cooperation 

KMA merchandises accounts: 
surveys its retail grocery and 
drug outlets ; informs all 
wholesalers, dealers, and dis- 
tributors of accounts on the 
air; publicizes programs and 
personalities who sell for ad- 
vertisers; displays advertisers' 
products in its Mayfair Audi- 
torium, where weekly hundreds 
of Midwest farmers are enter- 
tained. 

That's why your schedule must 
be on KMA to cover the rural 
Omaha-Des Moines market! 



KMA 



SHENANDOAH, IOWA 

Represented by 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



t , s -Television 

Station 1B* TV ' we efc vntn 
programs " u 

WOlkS ' CBS • ABC 



Under Management of 

MAY BROADCASTING CO. 

Shenandoah,' Iowa 



510 Madison 



FALL FACTS ISSUE 

This is a brief note of correction to 
the otherwise excellent summary of the 
present status of out-of-home radio 
listening measurement in SPONSOR'S 
Fall Facts issue. 

Only the original experimental re- 
search on out-of-home radio listening 
was conducted jointly by WNEW and 
Pulse. Since August, 1949, Pulse's 
out-of-home ratings for the New York 
market have been available as a coop- 
erative service to broadcasters. These 
surveys are not made exclusively for 
WNEW. WNEW is. and has been since 
August, 1949, merely a subscriber. 

C. R. Himmel 

Director of Research 

WNEW 

New York 



I just saw }our Fall Facts issue 
and although I haven't had the op- 
portunity to read it from cover to cov- 
er — that's going to take a lot of time 
— it certainly looks to me as though 
you have done your usual sparkling 
job. I think this sort of treatment of a 
current and vital subject does more for 
radio than almost anything else you 
could do. 

Maurice B. Mitchell 

Director 

BAB 

New York 



Your Fall Facts issue is a honey! 
And not because there are two like- 
nesses of yours truly and one of Dan 
Denenholz. either. 

Plenty of meat for our TV prospects 
to chew on; here's hoping it provides 
all of us with nourishment. 

Don L. Kearney 

Assistant Sales Manager for TV 

The Katz Agency 

New York 



of the most graphic comparisons of ra- 
dio and newspapers. 

Every retailer in the United States 
should have a copy of this article. 

L. W. Allen 

General Manager 

WFLB 

Fayetteville, N. C. 



Please advise me if reprints are 
available for your feature "Three 
Proofs of Radio's Vitality'' in your 17 
Jul\ issue. If so please let me know 7 
the cost. 

If reprints are not available, would 
you give us permission to reproduce 
ths feature, giving sponsor credit. 

This feature is. in my opinion, one 



We would very much appreciate it 
if you will send us some extra televi- 
sion maps as they appeared in your 17 
Julv issue. These will be very useful. 
Also you can let us have a few extra 
copies of the above issue of sponsor 
as there are different articles that can 
be distributed to different departments 
in our organization. 

Richard C. Grahl 
William Esty Co. 
New York 



I have just briefly glanced through 
sponsor, 17 July 1950 Fall Facts is- 
sue. Needless to say, I am greatly con- 
cerned about the television map for 
sponsor's center spread in this particu- 
lar issue which shows existing network 
links for this fall as well as network 
links under construction. 

In the interests of accurate and up- 
to-the-minute reporting I am sure you 
can appreciate the fact that two weeks 
ago the F.C.C. granted to WSAZ-TV 
a CP to build a micro-wave relay sys- 
tem to connect WSAZ-TV by off the 
air pickups with all Cincinnati tele- 
vision stations, thereby connecting 
WSAZ-TV with live network program- 
ing. It is certainly significant that as 
of today we have completed erection 
on a 1,200-foot hill at South Ports- 
mouth, Kentucky, two 200-foot towers 
and we are at this moment only await- 
ing the arrival of micro-wave gear 
which, incidentally, is expected mo- 
mentarily. 

It would appear to me that while un- 
doubtedly there is great interest in the 
proposed Omaha to San Francisco 
link due in 1952, there should be even 
greater reportorial significance in a 
Huntington to Cincinnati link which is 
not only under construction but is 
scheduled to be in operation either 
shortly before or shortly after 1 Sep- 
tember. 1950. but in any even certainly 
in operation in time to carry the fall 
1950 television network connected pro- 
graming for which WSAZ-TV now has 
a sizeable number of weekly hours. 
[Please turn to page 62 I 



SPONSOR 



Kraoi» 



• • - 



, £ 0?AS& 




50,000 WattStxUon 
rfot ?Mu(rAme'uca in 



Cover the Metropolitan Areas 
of Missouri and Kansas plus 
Rural Mid-America with KCMO 

ONE Does it in Mid-America 

• ONE station 

• ONE rate card 

• ONE spot on the dial 

• ONE set of call letters 

50,000 WATTS 

DAYTIME 

ftlA l## 10,000 WATTS 
OIU KU NIGHT 



T/lllL'l- 4"»*» =r — 



"TOPEKA 

■pi T 



ST. JO SEPH 

'FT 

.NSAS- 
'CITY_ 



OKLAHOMA 



>\s 






• MAIL counties shown in gray; Vi mv. contour 
imposed black line 



super- 




KANSAS CITY 6, MISSOURI 

Basic ABC For Mid-America 

National Representative: John E. Pearson Company 



14 AUGUST 1950 




South's Greatest Audience 

Builder, Too 

Our advertisers get the ben- 
efit of all these — 24-sheet 
posters, streetcar dash signs, 
full -page newspaper ads, 
store displays, personal calls 
. on jobbers and key retailers. 

J 





-Jfcfc 




v 



V 



<®/ 



fc^l 



4 : &* 



^ 




He Piles Up Biggest 

Ratings, of Course 

WWL has a substantial lead in both mornings and 
afternoons. And, evenings, its share of audience is 
equal to the next two stations combined. 

SPONSOR 



South's Greatest Salesman 

in South's Greatest City 

SELLS Rich Rural Market 

Southland farmers depend on WWL for complete authentic coverage of 
their special interests welcome activities such as WWL's Herd Improve- 
ment Contests, farm service broadcasts, weather reports, on-the-scene 
rural reports. WWL advertisers enjoy particular preference when these 
newly-prosperous folks go shopping for everything that means better living. 




Gives You 
Multi-State Coverage 

WWL takes you into 330 counties of I 
the rich Southland — gives you primary 
coverage in 134 of them. 



50,000 WATTS 




CLEAR CHANNEL 



CBS AFFILIATE 



A DEPARTMENT OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE KATZ AGENCY 



14 AUGUST 1950 





Very Important People — they make today's news- 
start today's fads — control todays audiences. 
At KTTV we collect em like stamps. Our VIP lineup of stars 
and shows... whether the best from CBS-TV or our 
own impressive roster... sponsored by the largest national 
advertisers as well as local sellers. ..gives us a VIP audience, 
the Very Important Public of Southern California, 
second greatest in the nation. Happily, you don't have to 
spend a million to make an impression with KTTV's VIP lineup. 
>nt you're in good company... you get seen 
and heard a lot... you can sell a lot. You can reach that Very 
Important Public on KTTV. Ask us or Radio Sales. 



Los Angeles Times • CBS Television 



10 



SPONSOR 



New and rvneu 



14 August 1950 




These reports appear in alternate issues 



New on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY NO. 


OFNETSTATK 


American Safety Razor 








Corp & Phar ma- 








Craft Corp 


i;. .mil .V Ryan (N.Y.) 


\i.ci\ 


1" 


American Safety Razor 


McCann-Erlckaon (N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




Hemlix Homo Appliances 








Inc 


Tatham-Laird (N.Y.) 


ABC-TA 


36 


Block Drug Co 


Cecil & I'resbre) (N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




The Bond Clothing Stores 


Grey (N.Y.) 


DuMont 


9 


Brown Shoe Co. 


Leo Burnett (Chi.) 


NBC-TV 


11 


Carter Products Corp 


SSC&B (N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




< 'he. rolel Corp 


' ...ii|.i.. II I ., ,1.1 (Detroit) 


DuMont 


11 


Chrysler Corp 








(DeSoto div) 


EIBD&O (N.Y.) 


NBC-TV 


•15 


Colpate-Palinolive-Peet 








Co 


Ted Bales 


NBC-TV 


30 


Esquire Polishes 


Kniil Mogul (N.Y.) 


DuMont 


29 


Esso -Standard Oil Co 


McCann-Erickson (N.Y.) 


1 BS-TV 




Cruen Watch Co 


Storklon. West. Bnrkharl 








Inc (N.Y.) 


ABC-TV 


26 


The Ironrite Corp 


Brooke. Smith) French & 








Dorrance (N.l ) 


AEC-TV 


lo 


Kroger Co 


Balph II Jones (Cincinnati) 


CBS-TV 




Lionel Corp 


Buchanan (N.Y.) 


NBC-TV 


37 


Magna vox Corp 


Maxon (N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




Peter Paul Inc 


Maxon (N.Y.) 


NBC-TV 


38 


Philip Morris & Co 


Blow (N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




Nash Motors Corp 


Geyer, Newell ei Ganger 
(N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




Pepsi Cola Co 


Blow (N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




Proct€*r & Camhlc Co 


Compton 


NBC-TV 


21 


lti-i:i . Tohacco Co 


Brooke. smith. French & 








Dorrance (N.Y.) 


NBC-TV 


8 


Seem an Brothers Inc 


William H. Weintranb (N.Y.) 


ABC-TV 


15 


Sterling Drug Co 


Dancer-Fitzgerald -Sam pie 








(N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




Sylvania Products Inc 


Cecil & Presbrcy (N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




Wine Corporation of 








America 


Weiss & Geller (Chi.) 


ABC-TV 


23 



Sugar Bowl; M 9-9:3(1 pin: 2 Oct; 52 wk- (si r.-.l .in alternate 

weeks b> VSK and Pharma-Craft) 
Hie show Goes On; Th 8-8:3(> pm : 28 Sep; 52 wks 

Chance of a Lifetime; W 7:30-8 pin: 6 Sep; 52 wks 
Unnamed; T 10-10:30 pm ; 19 Sep: 52 wk- 
Hands of Mystery; I 8:30-9 pm; 8 Sep: 52 «k. 
Sniilin' Ed McConnell; >.ii 6:30-7 pm: 26 Aug; 52 wks 
Sins: ll Again; Sal 10-10:15 pm : 30 Sep: 52 wks 
Noire Dame Football; Sat 2 pm to conclusion; 5 wks 

Groucho Marx: Th 8-8:30 inn: 5 Oct; 52 wks 

Unnamed; Sun 8-9 pm; 10 Sep; 52 »k- 
Hold That Camera; F 8:30-9 pm; 15 Sep 
Football •■ami's; Sat 1 :3(> pm to conclusion; 3(1 Sep; 8 wks 

Blind Date; Th 9:3(1-10 pm : 29 Sep; 52 wks 

HolKw I Screen Test; >l 7:30-8 pm ; 2 Oct; 52 wks 

Allan Young Show; Th 9-9 :3() pm; 14 Sep; 52 wks 
Joe DiMaggio Show; Sat 5:30-5:45 pm: 23 Sep; 13 wks 
Unnamed; I' 9-10 pm (alternate wks); 15 Sep: 52 wk. 
Hank McCune Show; Sat 7-7:30 pm; 9 Sep: 52 wks 
Unnamed; Th 10-10:30 pm; 7 Sep: 52 wks 
Unnamed; Th 10:30-11 pm: 28 Sep; 52 »k> 
Winner Take All; F 10-10:30 pm : 29 Sep; 52 wks 
Unnamed; T. Th, Sat 7:15-8 pm: 26 Sep; 52 wks 
Unnamed; M 9:30-10:30 pm (alternate wks): 18 Sep; 40 wks 

Leave ll to the Girls; Sun 7-7:30 pin; 20 Aug; 13 wks 
I Cover Times Square; Th 10-10:30 pm; 5 Oct; 52 wks 

Sing It Again; Sat 10:30-11 pm; 30 Sep; 52 »k- 
Beal the Clock; F 10-10:30 pm; 29 Sep; 52 wks 

Can luu Top This; T 9:30-10 pm ; 3 Oct; 52 wks 



Renewals on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NO. OF NET STATIONS 



Blatz Brewing Co 


Kastor. Farrell, Chesley & 
Clifford (N.Y.) 


ABC-TV 


1 t 


Emerson Radio & 


Foote, Cone & Belding 


NBC-TV 


31 


Phonograph Corp 


(N.Y.) 






General Electric Co 


Young & Ruhicam i IV. Y.) 


CBS-TV 




C. II Masland & Sons 


Anderson, Davis & Platte 
(N.Y.) 


CBS-TV 




Pahst Sales Co 


Warwick & Legler (N.Y'.) 


CBS-TV 




Sundial Shoes 


Iloag & Provandic (Boston) 


CBS-TV 





PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

The Holler Derby; Th 10:30 pm-rouclusion ; 28 Sep; 52 wks 

The Clock; F 9:30-10 pin (alternate wks); 20 Oct; 13 wks 

Freil Waring: Sun 9-10 pm; 24 Sep; 52 wks 

Masland At Home Party; M 11-11:15 pin; 11 Sep; 52 wks 

International Boxing Club; W 10 pm to conclusion: 27 Sep; 39 wks 
Lucky Pup; F 6:30-6:15 pm; 18 Aug: 39 wks 



Station Representation Changes 



STATION 

MM. Montreal 
KPHO. Phoenix 
KTLA. Hlywd. 
WAAr\ Chicago 
WCLE, Clearwater, 
WERD. Atlanta 
WGAT, Utica 
WBXI, WHLI-FM. 



stead. I.. I. 



«HTN, WHTN-FM. Huntington, W. 
WJPS. F.vansville. Ind. 
WPTR. Albanv 



AFFILIATION 

Independent 

ABC 

ABC, CBS, DuMont, NBC 

Independent 
Independent 
Independent 
Independent 
Independent 

Independent 

ABC 

Independent 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

Itadio Time Sales. Ontario 
Petry, N.Y. 

Paul II. Ravmcr Co. N.Y. (eff 1 Aug) 
The Pearson Co. N.Y. 
Independent Metropolitan Sales. N.Y. 
Interstate United Newspapers, N.Y. 
Robert Meeker Assoc. N.Y. 
The William G. Ramheau Co, N.Y. 
(effective 1 Aim I 

Independent Metropolitan Sales, N. Y. 
Walker Co. N.Y. 

W ecd & Co, N.\ r . 



fit next issue: l\ew and Kenewed on Networks, l\ew> Nutiomtl Spot Rtnllo Business, 
National Broatlvast Sales Executive Chanties, Sponsor Personnel Changes, 

iVete .4(;et!cif .tppoittttiietifs 



New and Renewed Spot Television 



\ru- and Renew 14 August 1950 



SPONSOR 

American Chicle Co 

American Cigarette & C 

Co 
Benrus Watch Co 
Benrus Watch Co 
Borden Co 
Borden Co 
Borden Co 
Borden Co 
Brown & Williamson 

Tobacco Co 
Bui ova Watch Co 
D. J. Clark Candy Co 
Golgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 
General Foods Corp 
C^oodyear Tire & Rubber 
The Great Atlantic & Pa. 

Tea Co 
Heide Inc 
Morrell & Co 
Norwich Pharmacal Co 
Pepsi Cola Co 
Philip Morris 
Procter & Gamble Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 
Procter & Gamble Co 

It i Art Metal Works 

Rushmore Paper Mills In 
Standard Brands Inc 
Standard Brands Inc 



AGENCY 



NET OR STATION 



Badger and Br 


owning & 


WNBQ, Chi. 


Hersev 






igar SSC&B 




WNBK, Cleve. 


J. D. Tarcher 




WBZ-TV. Boston 


J. D. Tarcher 




WRGB. Schen. 


Young & Rubicam 


WNBK, Cleve. 


Young & Rubicam 


WNBQ, Chi. 


Young & Rubicam 


WNBW, Wash. 


Young & Rubicam 


WNBQ, Chi. 


Ted Bates 




WNBT, N.Y. 


Blow 




WRGB, Schen. 


BBD&O 




WNBT, N.Y. 


Sherman & Marquette 


WBZ-TV, Boston 


Young & Uulii. 


am 


KNBH, Hlywd. 


Co Conipton 




WNBQ, Chi. 


inc Paris & Peart 




WNBT, N.Y. 


Kellv Nason 




WBZ-TV, Boston 


N. W. Ayer 




WNBQ, Chi. 


Kenton & Bow 


es 


WBZ-TV. Boston 


Blow 




WNBW, Wash. 


Blow 




WNBT, N.Y. 


Benton & Bowl 


es 


WBZ-TV, Boston 


Pedlar & Ryan 




WNBQ, Chi. 


Pedlar & Ryan 




KNBH, Hlwyd. 


Conipton 




WNBQ, Chi. 


Inc Grey 




WRGB, Schen. 


c Paris & Peart 




WNBT, N.Y. 


Conipton 




WNBT, N.Y. 


Conipton 




WNBQ, Chi. 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Eight-sec film; 23 Jul; 24. wks (a) 

i inin film; 31 Jul; 22 wks (r) 

20-sec film; 2 Jul; 32 wks (n) 

20-sec film; 3 Jul; 52 wks (n) 

20-sec film; 4 Aug; 52 wks (r) 

20-sec film; 2 Jul; 52 wks (r) 

20-sec film; 2 Jul; 52 wks (r) 

20-sec film; 8 Jul; 52 wks (n) 

Eight-sec film and slides; 17 Jul; 19 wks (r) 

20-sec film; 16 Jun; 23 wks (n) 
One-min film; 2 Aug; 13 wks; (r) 
One-min film; 10 Jul; 52 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 2 Aug; 25 wks It.l 
20-sec film; 19 Jul; 52 wks (n) 
One-min film; 4 Jul; 33 wks (r) 

One-min film; 22 Jul; 26 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 31 Jul; 13 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 10 Jul; 25 wks (n) 
20-sec stn breaks; 3 Jul; 13 wks (n) 
20-see film; 16 Jul; 21 wks (r) 

3 Jul; 46 wks <n> 
vks <r) 

6 Jul; 52 wks i .. I 

19 Jul; 52 wks <n) 
Stn breaks; 3 Jul; 26 wks (r) 
Eight-sec stn break; 16 Jul; 13 wks (n) 
20-sec film; 8 Jul; 45 wks <n) 
20-sec film; 3 Aug; 52 wks (n) 



20-sec film; 

20-sec film; 5 Jul; 52 

20-sec lili. 

20-sec filr 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



AI Anderson 
Clarence K. Bagg 
Raymond W. Baldwin Jr 
Paul A. Carey 
Charles V. Davis 
George Dock Jr 
Geoffrey C. Doyle 
Richard Edward Drum ray 
H. Linn Edsall 
Alan I Hausman 
R. E. Jefferson 
Fred R. Jones 
Ronald J. Kahn 
Jack W. Laemmar 
Robert G. McKown 

Robert McLaren 
C. E. Midgley Jr 
Carlos Montalban 
Michael Ncwmark 
Edwin Parkin 
William P. Pettit 
Richard A. Russell 
Meyer Sacks 
Lou Scott 
Byrna Sclippen 
Arnold C. Shaw 

Gary Sheffield 

Robert S. Simpers 
Richard W. Smith 

L. T. Steele 

Harold Tusker 
Phil Thompson 
Clyde D. Vortman 
Rita Wagner 



Amfra Industries, N.Y., pub rel rep 

Sylvan ia Electric Products Television, N.Y. sis mgr 
Wing Cargo Inc, Phila. 

Fletcher D. Richards, N.Y., copywriter 
Leo Burnett Co, L.A. 

Albert Frank-Guenther Law, N.Y., acct exec 
Cecil & Presbrey, N.Y., acct exec 
WOW, Omaha, tv rep 
Craven & Hedrick Inc, N.Y., vp 
Scheck Advertising, Newark 

Intercontinental Packers Ltd, Saskatoon, sis mgr 
Abbott Kimball Co, L.A., copy chief 
Pub rel exec, Dallas 
Foote, Cone & Bclding, Chi. 

Brooke, Smith. French & Dorranre, Detroit, person- 
nel dir 
Theatre and motion picture consultant 
CBS, N.Y., sis sve mgr 
Latin American broadcast activity 
Friend-Krieger, N.Y., acct exec 
Parkin Advertising. N.Y., head of agency 
N. W. Ayer, N.Y. 

Foote, Cone & Bclding. N.Y., exec 
A. W. Lewin, N.Y., copy chief 
McCarty Co, L.A.. sr acct exec 



Cle 



em of Dallas staff 



Sheffield Advertising, head of agency 

J. Walter Thompson Co, N.Y., acct exec 

Griswold-Eshlcman Co, Cleve., mgr of Louisville 

office and acct exec 
Benton & Bowles, vp in charge of West Co 

operations 
Foote, Cone & Belding. Chi. 
Joseph Katz Co, N.Y., copy and radio dir 
Brooke, Smith, French & Dorranre, Detroit 
Hirshon-G airfield, N.Y., acct exec 



McLaren, Parkin, Kahn Inc, N.Y.. dir of radio, tv 

Bermingham, Castleman & Pierce, N.Y.. merch dir 

Van Slyck S.F., partner 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger, Inc, N.Y., copy dep 

Barnes Chase Co, L.A., acct exec 

Same, vp 

Robert Conahay & Assoc, N.Y.. acct exec 

Edward Petry & Co, N.Y., radio, tv time sis (Dallas offire) 

Same, elected dir and sec 

Franklin, Berlin & Tragerman. N.Y., acct exec 

Stewart-Bowman. Maepherson, Winnipeg, acct exec 

Platt-Forbes, S.F., creative dir 

McLaren, Parkin. Kahn Inc, N.Y., pres 

J. Walter Thompson. Chi., acct exec 

Same, bus mgr 

McLaren, Parkin, Kahn Inc. N.Y.. vp 

Ted Bates & Co, N.Y., mgr tv, radio media dept 

McLaren, Parkin, Kahn Inc, N.Y., head of intl dept 

Same, gen sis dir 

McLaren, Parkin, Kahn Inc, N.Y.. vp, trea* 

Grecn-Brodie, N.Y., acct exec 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, N.Y., acct exec 

Joseph Katz, N.Y., copy exec 

Foote, Cone & Belding, L.A., aect exec 

McLaren, Parkin, Kahn Inc, N.Y.. media head 

Same, in charge of Tyler office (new office located in Peoples 

National Bank Building) 
McLaren, Parkin, Kahn Inc, N.Y.. acct exec 
Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather. VV. exec 
Doe-Anderson, Louisville, acct exec 



Be 



Hon & Bowles, N.Y., acct super v 



J. Walter Thompson, Chi., acct exec 
Cecil & Presbrey, N.Y., copy chief 
Zimmcr-Keller, Detroit, head of media dept 
Hewitt, Ogilvy. Benson & Mather. N.Y., acct exec 



1950 IOWA RADIO SURVEY 
MORE STARTLING THAN EVER! 



More Iowa Homes, Plus More Radio Sets 
Per Home, Equal More Listening ! 



tMGURES from the 1950 Iowa Radio Audience 
Survey** (soon to be released) confirm the 
reasoning behind that headline — prove that your 
Iowa radio dollar buys more today than ever. Here's 
the evidence, step by step . . . 

(I) "More Iowa Radio Homes." The following 
chart shows the increase in the number of 
radio-equipped Iowa homes since 1940 and 
since 1945. With more than an 8% increase 
in the last ten years, the number of Iowa 
homes with radio is now near 100%! 



RADIO-EQUIPPED IOWA HOMES 



1940 
Survey 



1945 1950 

Survey I Survey 



Percentage of all homes 

owning radios 



90.8% 93.6% 98.9%* 



* Amazing as this increase in radio homes is, since 1940, it 
of course does not reveal the tremendous increase in total 
number of Iowa homes — up 70,000 since 19401 

(2) "More Radio Sets Per Iowa Home." The 
following chart shows the tremendous increase 
in the number of Iowa homes which have 
graduated from one-set to multiple-set owner- 
ship since 1940 and 1945. Almost half of all 
Iowa radio homes now have more than one 
radio set! 



NUMBER OF SETS 
PER RADIO-EQUIPPED IOWA HOME 




1940 
Survey 


1945 
Survey 


1950 
Survey 


Percentage of radio 

homes owning: 

' Only one set in the home 

Two sets in the home 

Three or more sets in the home 


81.8% 
13.8% 

4.4% 

100.0% 


61.5% 

29.4% 

9.1% 

100.0% 


51.2% 
35.6% 
13.2% 

100.0% 



(3) "More Iowa Radio Listening." The following 
chart shows that more Iowa sets mean more 
Iowa listening. The 1949 Survey used a 24- 
hour recall method to determine the amount 
of simultaneous listening in multiple-set 
homes. This year the Survey placed a two- 



day diary on a large sample of multiple-set 
homes. Both surveys found that between Vi 
and 1/3 of all two-set families use two sets 
simultaneously each day — between Yl an( l 2 /z 
of all three-set families listen to two or three 
sets simultaneously each day! 



FAMILIES WHO USE TWO OR 
MORE SETS SIMULTANEOUSLY EACH DAY 




1949 Recall 
Study 


1950 Diary 
Reports 


Reported Simultaneous Use: 
Homes equipped with two sets 
Homes equipped with three sets 


26.4% 
50.2% 


38.9% 
61.8% 



More Iowa radio homes, plus more radio sets per 
Iowa radio home, equals more Iowa radio listening. 
And WHO, of course, continues to get the greatest 
share of Iowa's total radio listening. 

Let us or Free & Peters send you all the facts, 
including a complimentary copy of the new Survey 
now on the press. 

**The 1950 Iowa Radio Audience Survey is the thirteenth 
annual study of radio listening habits in Iowa. It is a 
"must" for every advertising, sales or marketing man 
who is interested in radio in general, and the Iowa market 
in particular. 

The 1950 Edition was again conducted by Dr. F. L. Whan 
of Wichita University and his staff. It is based on 
personal interviews with 9,215 Iowa families, scientifically 
selected from Iowa's cities, towns, villages and farms. 

WHO will gladly send a copy of the 1950 Survey to any- 
one interested in the subjects covered. 

WIHI® 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. R. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 




FREE & PETERS, INC. 
National Representatives 



14 AUGUST 1950 



13 



s 







WGTMI 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 







5000 WATTS FULL TIME, 590 KC. 

Jan. 29~Feb. 4, 1950, Conlan shows 
46. 2 X' of morning audience, 5 3.8% 
afternoon and 54. 6y.' evening. Hard 
to beat? You bet . . . and now we're 
H33 . . making WGTM undisputed 
leader in one of the nation's highest 
cash farm income areas I Write Allen 
Wannamaker, WGTM, Wilson, N. C. 
or Weed & Co., Nat'l Reps. 

* SMSu-ey of Buyin, Power M.y 10, 1950 




3Ir. Sponsor 



/I I extt ii de r H a r r i s 

President 
Ronson Art Metal Works, Inc. 



"The best is the cheapest."' 

Alexander Harris, president of Ronson Art Metal Works, Inc., 
believes this; particularly when it comes to advertising. 

"If you want a large sales volume for a good product, you must 
bring that product before the public on a continuous and commanding 
scale," says Harris. He speaks quietly and is quick to smile, is just 
as quick to get his points across. "We have always used the best 
people and the best media, and feel now that radio and television 
are the most important part of our advertising schedule.*' 

Radio and TV actually get over half of the company's advertising 
budget. This year the budget will be over $2,500,000. On radio. 
Ronson leads all other lighters combined l>\ 50 to L; it is the largest 
user of television in the entire lighter industry. The company cur- 
rently spends more than $1,000,000 for its 20 Questions, aired on 
both radio (MBS, 492 stations) and TV IWOR-TV and the full 
ABC-TV network). In addition, the company averages two TV spot 
announcements per week in each of about 23 markets nationally 
(about 26 stations). More stations are added as choice time spots 
become available. 

Harris' advertising policies have paid off. When he became presi- 
dent of Ronson in 1940, total sales for the year amounted to $2,791,- 
000. Last year the sales had spiraled to a high of $32,128,076, about 
3 1 /-) million more than for 1948. Net profit last year was $5,417,173. 
Since its inception 55 years ago, the company has produced and 
sold over 40,000,000 lighters. 

Today Alexander Harris is practically synonymous with Ronson. 
He has been with the company since 1914, joined the then small 
companj as "general manager and case polisher." He was born in 
New York City in 1885. After graduating from the LJniversity of 
London in 1902, he went to work for the Raymond Whitcomb Travel 
Agenc) in the steamship department. Later he joined the auto firm 
of Cryder and Co. as its general manager; left there for Ronson. 

Outside of business, Harris is a man with many interests among 
which arc: linguistics; directing the Theodore Paton Harris Founda- 
tion for rheumatic children: farming (at least he lives on a farm) ; 
and collecting carh Americana. 



14 



SPONSOR 



MR. SPONSOR: 

WHICH STATION HAS THi 
AUDIENCE IH DETROIT? 

48% of all radio listeners on Sunday afternoon listen to WJBK. This is an 
all time high for any Detroit station at any time. WJBK'S Hoopers are far 
higher than all the other independent stations, and they compare favorably 
with the network stations— AT NO PREMIUM COST. 



Total Coinckkmtal G>ll« 
This Period I 5 ** 6 




HOOPER AAD/O AUDIENCE INDEX 

CITY ZONE 



CITY: DETROIT, MICH 
MONTHS: *«, 19S0 



iff fo, SHAKE Of R\D/0 AUDIENCE 


TIME 


RADIO 
SETS-IN-USE 


A 
NETW 


B 


WJBK 

AM FM 


c 


D 
NETW 


E 


F 
NETW. 


G 
NETW 




OTHER 
AM6-FM 


HOMES 

CALLED 


MON. THRU FRI. 
8:00 A^\.- 12:00 NOON 


12.6 


h.3 


1.8 


5.1+ 


3.2 


hi. 5 


1.1 


17.3 


2U.5 




0.7 


2 r 58l 


MON. THRU FRI. 
12:00 NOON-6:00 P.M. 


15.1 


S.h 


l.h 


17.5 


3.0 


28.0 


6.6 


22.7 


11*. 5 




0.8 


3,813 


SUNDAY 
12:00 NOON-6:00 P.M. 


21.9 


7.U 


0.7 


4So 


0.7 


7.k 


18.8 


8.9 


5.2 




3.0 


l.liW 


SATURDAY 
8:00 A.M.-6:00 P.M. 


NOT 


RAT 


E D ] 


N D E 


T R 


I T 














SUN.-SAT. EVE. 

6:00 P.M.- 10«30 P.M. 


15.9 


7.1 


1.0 


19.0 


3.2 


29.3 


5.7 


20.8 


12.3 




1.6 


7,606 



Why does WJBH have the Detroit audience? 

Because it consistently leads in community service and in programming, 
with the best in entertainment and talent, WJBK has extraordinarily high 
Hooper ratings. This, translated into exceptional listener-response, means 
high returns for your advertising dollar. See your KATZ representative for 
success stories of which WJBK is justly proud. 




WJBK 



-AM 

-FM 

-TV 



DETROIT 



NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 488 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 11, ELDORADO 5-2455 

Represented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

14 AUGUST 1950 15 



To 



One 




People 

CBS 

Means 

WDNC 



i w 



DURHAM, 
North Carolina 

5,000 WATTS 

620 k.c. 

PAUL H RAYMER, REP. 

16 




Queries 






This feature presents some of the most interest- 
ing questions asked of SPONSOR'S Research Dept. 
Readers are invited to call or write for information. 
Address: 510 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 



Q. When did you carry a story on Speidel Watchbands? 

Advertising agency librarian, New York 
A. 28 February, 1949, page 27; 1 August, 1949, page 19. 

Q. Have you done anything on television merchandising? 

Student, New York 
A. Our 199 TV Results should prove helpful. It sells for a dollar a 
copy to non-subscribers. In addition, a page of television results 
appears in alternate issues of sponsor. 

Q. What is Phonevision and when will it go into operation? 

Groceries distributor, Neiv Orleans 
A. Phonevision is a pay-as-you-watch method of video programing 
planned by the Zenith Radio Corporation. Ninety days of tests 
are planned in the Chicago area starting 1 October with viewers 
paying $1 for each Class A movie they see. Specially equipped 
TV sets to receive the Phonevision programing will be set up in 
300 Chicago area homes. 

Q. We know radio and TV set production are on the increase but 
how about FM sets? Appliance manufacturer, Chicago 

A. According to an estimate of the Radio-Television Manufacturers 
Association, FM and FM-AM radio set output totaled 539,852, 
an increase of more than 115,000 over the same 1949 period. 
WHO study of Iowa listening, just completed, shows 7.7% of 
Iowa homes with FM sets in 1949: 13.4% in 1950. 

Q. When did SPONSOR carry a story on Radox? 

Advertising agency association, New York 
A. We carried a story on Sindlinger's Radox in our 26 September, 
1949 issue, page 28. 

Q. Approximately how many foreign language stations are there in 

the U. S. ? College professor, St. Louis 

A. Foreign language broadcasting in 33 tongues was reported as a 
regular procedure for 384 stations according to a recent survey 
by the National Association of Broadcasters. Foreign language 
programs varied from less than one hour a week on these stations 
to more than 25 hours weekly. 

O. Can you give us the latest trends, as far as advertisers are con- 
cerned, from night to daytime network programing; night to 
daytime spot programing and from radio to TV? 

Large advertising agency, New York 
A. These trends are discussed in our Fall Facts issue, 17 July. 

Q. What stations in New Orleans are geared to contact the Negro 
market? Transcription company executive, New York 

A. The following disk jockeys serve the Negro market in New Or- 
leans: Poppa Stoppa, WJMR; Ernie Bringier; George "Tex" 
Stephens of WMRY. 

SPONSOR 



l\eu> developments on SPONSOR stories 



p.s 



5GG '. "Quaker rug's magic carpet' 

Issue: 24 April 1950, p. 24 

Subject"! Armstrong Cork Company 



The Armstrong Cork Company, well known for its successful radio 
show, is now in television. 

sponsor mentioned that the companj planned to use the medium 
in "Quaker rug's magic carpet." The format details of the Arm- 
strong video show have worked out much the same as SPONSOR lore- 
cast in its 24 April article. 

The new TV drama series, Armstrong's Circle Theatre, is a hall- 
hour show aired over the full NBC-TV network on Tuesdays, 9:30 
p.m. EDT. The show will run for 52 weeks, and will cost about 
$1,000,000 yearly for time and talent. Armstrongs popular radio 
show. Theatre of Today, continues to plug carpets to a women's 
audience, does not conflict with the TV programing. 

The television show, though similar to Theatre of Today, is angled 
toward the whole family. It promotes the complete line of Armstrong 
door coverings, plus its huilding materials. According to Paul Mark- 
man, account executive iBBD&Ol. "The companj uses original sto- 
ries purchased from the outside; stories about down-to-earth people 
we all know, the salt-of-the-earth kind. We do not use gor\ imstery 
or suspense dramas."' Cameron Hawley, advertising manager for 
Armstrong, is as active in the television productions as SPONSOR 
revealed he was in the company's radio programs. He has written at 
least one of the TV show scripts, and has personally supervised all 
of Armstrong's radio and television productions. 

The Armstrong Circle Theatre began 6 June with a program star- 
ring Brian Aherne. The company used as many big names as possi- 
ble for the first few months, then eased off with lesser talent during 
the summer. Plans call for a return to the top names in the fall. All 
commercials are live as is the show itself. A demonstrator who does 
the commercials describes items in five different display windows. 

Armstrong is well satisfied with the show thus far. The company 
has been swamped with letters complimenting the wholesome tvpe of 
program presented. According to the company, it was prompted to 
go into TV because of dealer enthusiasm for the medium. I Perhaps 
the prodding from competition such as Congoleum-Nairn with its 
Carroway at Large, NBC-TV. had an effect as well. ) 



p.s 



See: "Play ball: 1950" 

Issue: io April 1950, P 30 

Subject: Liberty Broadcasting System 



With a giant stride, Gorden McLendon, president of the Liberty 
Broadcasting System, Dallas, recently announced plans to broadcast 
major professional football games regularly on a coast-to-coast hook- 
up. That's going some for his young outfit. 

In its 10 April issue, sponsor reported an LBS baseball net of 
over 200 stations; the football net this fall will link more than 300 
stations. The stations will carry every game of the New York Yanks, 
at home and away. Games will be aired direct from the field. 

Liberty claims it has become America's third largest network I in 
station numbers) with 237 affiliates in 34 states. According to the 
network, on 1 October it will expand its operations into 48 states 
and plans to include over 300 affiliates. 




% 



Feline 

Time 

B"yer!r 

Lucky 
find 



!*<*#- 

*&***** 

'*'**£ »•*•* 




5000 watts DAY 

lOOOwattsNIGHT 
Directional 

San Antonio's Oldest 
Music and News Station 



h Forjoe & Co. 



14 AUGUST 1950 



17 




18 



SPONSOR 




ARTIST JARO HESS IS ONLY KIDDING BUT NOW AND THEN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES FEEL THEIR CLIENTS LOOK LIKE THIS 

What agencies would tell clients 



. . . if they dared 



part one of a two-part story 



over-all 



H. Querulous McGee was a 
bubble-gum manufacturer 
with wads of dough and plenty of bub- 
ble-gum production knowhow. A few 
years ago he decided to go into net- 
work radio. He went to his agency 
with this proposal: 

"I'd like to see you build a show 
with something to it. Good music, some 

14 AUGUST 1950 



singing. I want to build up the com- 
pany name. 

The agency men were aghast. Mc- 
Gee's bubble gum couldn't hope to gain 
a thing from a musical show. Research 
has shown that kids don't go for mu- 
sic, not the ones in the bubble-gum 
age brackets, anyhow. 

Finally, a brave account man was 



briefed by the agency radio depart- 
ment and sent in to talk McGee out of 
his interest in music. 

Once he saw the research facts and 
figures, McGee broke down and ad- 
mitted the whole thing was his wife's 
idea. She wanted to see him sponsor 
something the ladies in her bridge club 
could appreciate. 

19 



These itre some of lite worst sponsor foibles as the agencies see it 





Accepting non-professional opinion 



Are You A Problem Sponsor? 



The questions below are de- 
signed to put the spotlight on 
you as a sponsor. Score 2 for 
yes; 1 for sometimes or doubt- 
ful; then total your score. In- 
terpretation below. 

1. Do you feel that your 
agency can't be trusted to do 
its best on a program or an- 
nouncement campaign? 

2. Do you tend to give 
overconsideration to the opin- 
ions of people you meet con- 
cerning your broadcast adver- 
tising, even when they're not 
experts or people the adver- 
tising is designed to reach ?□ 

3. Do you tend to pooh- 
pooh the time element when 
you make requests to the 
agency ? □ 

4. Do you base your recom- 
mendations to your agency on 
"common sense" rather than 
on a study of proven broad- 
cast advertising rules? 



5. Do you keep your agency 
in the dark about ultimate ob- 
jectives of your firm, prefer- 
ring to let it work on a short- 
range basis? □ 

6. Do you put off getting a 
fair working knowledge of the 
new techniques and complexi- 
ties of TV? □ 

7. Do you take it on your- 
self to instruct your talent on 
how to do their assignments, 
instead of relying on the 
agency? □ 

8. Are your plans for radio 
and TV advertising based on 
hasty conception and impulse 
rather than on a searching 
estimate of your advertising 



needs? 



□ 



A score of 12 to 16 puts 
you definitely in the problem 
sponsor class; 6 to 11 makes 
you a borderline case; below 
6 indicates tbat you're one of 
the clients agencies love to 
work witb. 



Todaj . McGee sponsors a kids show 
and placates his wife with an extra trip 
to Bermuda on the added profits it s 
helped make for him. 

This <ml\ slightly apocryphal anec- 
dote puts a finger on one of the key 
agency gripes against sponsors: their 
tendenc\ to let personal, non-profes- 
sional opinions interfere with logical 
program or talent choice. 

SPONSOR recently made a tour of 
large and medium-sized agencies to 
gather just such gripes. Purpose of the 
tour was not to serve as a safety valve 
for the pent-up emotions of agency ra- 
dio and TV executives. Rather. SPON- 
SOR hoped to uncover flaws in sponsor 
thinking about radio and TV; sore 
points in agency-sponsor relationships: 
and suggestions for improvement. 

Probably extreme cases like McGee's 
are in the minority. But if just a few 
advertisers gain just a little added in- 
sight from the points brought up here, 
this article will have served its pur- 
pose. 

In a second article, sponsor will at- 
tack the subject of agency-sponsor re- 
lationships from the other angle and 
seek to point out chief advertiser criti- 
cisms of agencies. Obviously, there s a 
need for just such airing of problems 
by an objective source. Agency men 
can't tell off their clients: they don't 
dare ( though some of them show sur- 
prising courage at times). Advertisers, 
as well, are reluctant to come out with 
basic criticisms until their relationships 
with their agencies reach the breaking 
point. 



20 



SPONSOR 




Over-attention to detail 




Setting impossible deadlines 



Probably tbe chief complaint of 
agency radio and TV executives was 
based on the sponsors lack of faith in 
their abilities. In most of the 15 agen- 
cies visited. FAITH was the theme ad- 
men stressed first. 

"Damn it," said one of the most 
straight-from-the-shoulder radio-TV di- 
rectors in the business, "'these guvs go 
to a corporation lawyer or a doctor 
and they don't peer over his shoulder 
while he writes a brief or looks in the 
fluoroseope. But when it comes to the 
agency . . . wham. We're the guys the 
sponsor watches with an X-ray eye." 

Lack of real faith in the agency is a 
key factor in creating many unhapp) 
situations. To illustrate : 

This spring, a big network radio ad- 
vertiser decided to use a summer re- 
placement show for his regular variety 
half hour. His agency was asked to 
make recommendations. 

The agency, which can't be named 
for obvious reasons, is one of the old- 
est, wisest, and wealthiest in the busi- 
ness. Its radio executives sat down and 
mapped out what the\ considered a 
logical approach. First of all, what 
came before and after the sponsor's 
time slot? Both the shows preceding 
and following were comedies. The next 
question : what's the fare on other net- 
works at the same time? The three 
other nets carried detective stories. 

There were then three choices, as 
the agency saw it: (1) Schedule a de- 
tective story on the theory that this 
was just a good time for detective sto- 
ries. I 2 I Schedule a comedy show to 



keep in the mood of the other network 
shows surrounding the time spot. (3) 
Get some entirel) different program- 
ing. 

Of the three, the comedy show 
seemed most logical. The agency rea- 
soned that a fourth detective story on 
at that time was too much. There just 
weren't ihat many detective fans. In- 
evitably, a contrasting show would pull 
an audience of people who don't like 
detective stories. And a comedy show- 
seemed right because there was an au- 
dience built up to that mood available 
on the network immediately before and 
after the sponsor's time slot. 

All that was needed was a coined \ 
show which differed sufficiently in for- 
mat from the other two to sustain in- 
terest. The agency made preliminar) 
plans for building such a show, went 
to the sponsor. 

"You guys are taking the easy way 
out. was the client's eventual re- 
sponse. He felt that the agency wanted 
to slap together a comedy because that 
was simpler to do than build a detec- 
tive series. He held out for a fourth 
"who dun it." 

The agency man who told sponsor 
this story added a clincher: "All the 
time we were analyzing this thing, we 
owned rights to a detective story pack- 
age which we had developed a few 
years back. If we really wanted to 
take the easy way, we could have 
pulled that one out from the start." 

Thus it was a basic lack of faith in 
the agency's integrity and judgment 
which caused this advertiser to make 



what the agenc) planners feel is a poor 
move. Incidentally, don't try to figure 
out what network show is described 
here. To protect the agency, its iden- 
tity has been concealed by a few twists 
of the facts. 

Similarly, the identity of the real 
H. Q. McGee was disguised in the anec- 
dote at the beginning of this article. 
But McGee has his counterpart in real 
life. And, unfortunately, his failing 
was cited by the majority of agencies 
as typical of some of their clients. 
Apparently, the personal likes and dis- 
likes of sponsors and their wives are a 
frequent cause of trouble. 

Said one top TV vice president: "I 
would like to kick the next sponsor who 
tells me he didn't like last night's show. 
What difference does it make whether 
he likes the show as an individual. I 
want to know what the mass audience 
that show is designed to reach and in- 
fluence thinks. I've had shows with 
32 ratings on the air and then the spon- 
sors tohi me the show' wasn't any 
good." 

Another agency radio director com- 
mented : "I frequently work on pro- 
grams which are distasteful to me aes- 
thetically. I'm a Harvard man and I 
have a certain feeling for literature and 
art. But I have learned through ex- 
perience not to let my personal tastes 
interfere with the specific goals of a 
show 7 . Many sponsors lack that objec- 
tivity." 

A perfect example of the non-objec- 
tive advertiser was provided by still 
i Please turn lo page 4(> I 



14 AUGUST 1950 



21 










**i 



How in keep 
your dealer happy 



Spot newscasts and sporiseasts, 
strongly peppered \\ Uh iiipreliaiitlisiiig', 
is Shell formula sinee 1944 



22 



Ilk. Jim Brown, a bank teller in 
Fort Wayne, drove his new 
car into a Shell service sta- 
tion on his way home from work one 
evening last April, had his tank filled 
with "activated" Shell Premium. 'That 
Bob Carlin I the Shell newscaster) is 
the best newscaster anywhere. "' he re- 
marked pleasantly. '"Thought I'd give 
y our gas a try.*' 

He never stopped in again. Why? 

The question of Jim Brown's con- 
tinued patronage was in the hands of 
a dealer who wasn't as inviting as 
Shell's newscaster. Dealers like this 
one are Shell's main problem. That's 
where radio comes in. By upping deal- 
er morale. Shell radio programs keep 
their salesmanship as "activated" as 
their gasoline is said to be. 

Shell is one of the leaders in deliv- 
ering new customers to the driveways 
of service station operators. But Shell 
Oil Company advertising head D. C. 

SPONSOR 



SHELL PUTS THE SPOTLIGHT ON RADIO AT MOST OF ITS REGIONAL DEALER CONVENTIONS BY STAGING NEWS BROADCASTS. DEALEPi 






Shaded Area: Shell sales territory 
Dots: Shell sponsored stations 



I It is is current Shell Oil list of 57 stutiotis 



WAPI, Birmingham 

KNX, Los Angeles (anncmts) 

KFBK, Sacramento 

KNBC, San Francisco (anncmts) 

WTIC, Hartford 

WTOP, Washington, D. C. 

WMBR, Jacksonville 

WQAM, Miami 

WAGA, Atlanta 

WMAQ, Chicago 

WEEK, Peoria 

WEOA, Evansville 

WOWO, Ft. Wayne 

WMT, Cedar Rapids 

WOC, Davenport 

WHAS, Louisville 

WDSU, New Orleans 

WRDO, Augusta, Maine 

WLBZ, Bangor 



WCSH, Portland 

WFBR, Baltimore 

WHDH, Boston 

WEEI, Boston 

WTAG, Worcester 

WJR, Detroit 

WJEF, Grand Rapids 

WKZO, Kalamazoo 

KSTP, Minneapolis 

WEBC, Duluth 

WMFG, Hibbing, Minn. 

WHLB, Virginia, Minn. 

KYSM, Mankato, Minn. 

KROC, Rochester, Minn. 

KSD, St. Louis 

KMOX, St. Louis 

WMUR, Manchester, N. H. 

WXKW, Albany, N. Y. 

WAGE, Syracuse 



WNBC, New York 
WBT, Charlotte 
WAKR, Akron 
WSAI, Cincinnati 
WGAR, Cleveland 
WBNS, Columbus 
WLOK, Lima, Ohio 
KOIN, Portland 
WJAR, Providence 
WCOS, Columbia, S. C. 
WJMX, Florence, S. C. 
KXYZ, Houston 
WJOY, Burlington, Vt. 
KJR, Seattle 
WDUZ, Green Bay 
WISN, Milwaukee 
WEAU, Eau Claire, Wise. 
WJMC, Rice Lake, Wise. 
KGU, Honolulu 



ET LOCAL COMMENTATOR AFTER EACH SHOW 



Marschner and C. W. "Chuck" Shu- 
gert, in charge of media, know very 
well they are at the mercy of their 25- 
30,000 f ranch bed dealers when it 
comes to turning the Jim Browns into 
"regulars" who come back again and 
again. 

These individual dealers, the Shell 
advertising heads realized, mean the 
difference between so-so sales and the 
kind of push that keeps earnings mov- 
ing ahead briskly. That's why Shell 
decided in 1944 they needed something 
that would not only add a direct sell- 
ing punch to their newspaper and out- 
door poster advertising; they wanted 
something that would tie their dealers 
into the program, make dealers feel 
more a part of the advertising effort. 

So in 1944. following a war-curtailed 
ad program which included no broad- 
casting, the Shell strategists decided to 
start sponsoring 15-minute newscasts 
I Please turn to page 55) 




Shell programs are merchandised heavily through billboards, and letters, cards sent to dealers 



14 AUGUST 1950 



23 




CBS picture by William Noyes captures joy of kids watching their first TV show. Tots strongly influence adult viewing 

How moppets hypo adult viewiii; 

Ohio State .study, plus other evidence, reveals that nighttime choice 
of grownups 9 program is often determined hy husy young fingers 



\\ hen \l ilton Berle mugs 
into the TV camera just 
before Star Theatre fades 
off at 9:00 and plies the kiddies with 
urgent admonitions to be good ... to 
be carelul crossing streets ... to go 
right to bed now. thats supposed to 
curry favor with parents. 

\nd that's all lo the good for Tex- 
aco products. 

But "I nele Milts" and his Texas 
Company sponsors (along with a lot 
"I other advertisers) may be surprised 
to learn that the votes of youngsters 
between the ages of six and 12 have a 
lot to do with whal adull shows are 
viewed by grownups in the evening all 
the way up to 9:30. 

This, al least, is the case in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, as established by an Ohio 



24 



State University diary study made the 
first week of last March. There's no rea- 
son to believe the small fry of New 
York, or Dallas, or Los Angeles exert 
less pull with mama and papa than do 
their counterparts in Columbus. Ohio. 

Comedy dramatic type shows had 
the greatest appeal as a class for Co- 
lumbus children. Three program types 
rated consistently lower in homes with 
children than in "base" homes — homes 
without children. They were I 1 I "hu- 
man interest" shows; (2) crime or 
thriller type shows, especially those 
with a strong psychological emphasis; 
and ( ',') I musical programs. 

Children not only influenced the 
type of program viewed in their homes, 
hut were responsible for terrific differ- 
ences in ratings of individual programs 



within the different categories. 

For example, the average rating of 
comedy dramatic programs as a class 
was 119 r P higher in homes with chil- 
dren than in adult-only homes. At the 
other extreme. What's My Line, a hu- 
man interest type show, rated S\ c /c 
lower in homes with children. It is 
probable that this effect holds good in 
principle even where. If this proves to 
be the case, an entirely new approach 
is suggested for expanding adult audi- 
ences in homes which include children. 

The Columbus stud\ was made by 
Richard M. Mall, a graduate student 
in radio and television programing at 
Ohio State University; he worked un- 
der the supervision of Dr. Harrison B. 
Summers of the university s Depart- 
ment of Speech. 

SPONSOR 




56% up 



' Aldrich Family, " on air same time as show at right, had 
56'. higher rating in homes with kids than in adult-only 



w- 



( 



down 



'This Is Show Business" rating was 50' « lower in homes 
with tots than in adult-only. Kids' vote made difference 




27%) UD Pnilco Playhouse" rated 27' i higher in homes with kids 
" than in adult-only. As result, its over-all rating was upped 



21% (JOWIl Fred Waring" in adult was 21% below rating in kid 
homes. Over-all rating was 10 below show at left 



Mall placed diaries in the homes of 
200 families who kept quarter-hour-b\ - 
quarter-hour records over a seven-day 
period. The families were a cross-sec- 
tion of the television-owning homes of 
Columbus, representing every section 
of the city. Distribution of the sample 
according to educational and socio-eco- 
nomic levels was onl\ slijrhtlv ahove 



that of the population of the citj as a 
whole. About half the sample families 
had children of school age. 

At the time the study was made, 
about 45.000 TV sets had been sold in 
the Columbus area. The situation in 
Columbus was unique in that three TV 
stations were in operation in a city of 
400.000 population. Three-station com- 



petition was a\ailable for seven or 
more hours each day of the test week. 
The stud\ reveals, on a scale never 
before measured, the importance of 
children in choice of programs viewed 
by adults; it also confirmed tentative 
conclusions of other studies which in- 
dicated higher sets-in-use statistics in 
I Please turn lo page 52 I 



Average hours per week 
of television viewing 



Homes with 
children 



Homes with 
no children 



Mornings 








Monday throu 


gh 






Friday 




.78 


.20 


Afternoons 








Monday throu 


gh 






Friday 




9.35 


4.10 


Afternoons 








Saturday and 








Sunday 




3.03 


2.42 


Evenings 








Entire week 




25.89 


24.51 


Total hours 






Entire week 




39.05 


31.23 



TV "sets in use" in homes tvith or without children* 



Period 
starting 



1:00 p.m. 

1:30 
2:00 
2:30 
3:00 
3:30 
4:00 
4:30 
5:00 
5:30 



Adults 
only 



7.4 

6.1 

5:6 

7.1 

7.6 

11.3 

14.0 

22.9 

24.1 

26.4 



*Half-hour periods, Monday through Frida 
Ohio State University study. 



With 


Period 


Adults 


With 


hildren 


starting 


only 


children 


9.4 


6:00 p.m. 


42.3 


73.6 


7.9 


6:30 


54.4 


73.3 


8.4 


7:00 


60.6 


77.5 


13.3 


7:30 


59.2 


67.0 


17.1 


8:00 


77.5 


76.9 


22.0 


8:30 


81.3 


79.6 


30.9 


9:00 


77.9 


75.3 


42.8 


9:30 


78.0 


72.5 


61.0 


10:00 


72.5 


70.2 


70.7 


10:30 


63.0 


59.0 


ugh Friday 


combined. Soi 


irce of this anc 


1 chart at left 




] . Dynamic's pitch: "See a set in your home 



from Dynamic's stations are received he 



3. Next step: salesmen are informed of prosf 



This team bats ..111(1 in sales 



Air advertising plus home demonstration technique scores heavily 
for TV set dealers in niaiiv cities 



When RCA unveiled its 
n e W MP— "Million Proof" 
line of television sets on Sunday, 16 
July, the reaction was immediate from 
a public which had been alerted by 
weeks of drum-beating on the air and 
in newspapers and magazines. But no; 
body reacted faster than RCA's com- 
petitors in the Number One television 
market — the New York metropolitan 
area. Leading the pack as usual was the 
leading radio advertisers among the 
"free demonstration" school of retail- 
ers — Dynamic Stores. 

Dynamic in New York is but one of 
the dozens of dealers in TV cities all 
over the country who are cashing in 
on "free demonstrations" teamed with 
air advertising. 

Dynamic, with six stores in the New 
York area selling nationally-known ap- 
pliances, including Admiral television 
sets, uses radio locally as the Robert 
Hall clothing chain does nationally— 
on a broad, saturation-frequency basis. 
With a watchful eye on the competi- 
tion, Dynamic's advertising manager, 
Sidney Home, won't disclose the size 
of his radio budget. But the most con- 
servative estimate from a qualified in- 
dustry source is $100,000 a year. \l 
peak periods Dynamic has bought time 
"ii virtually all of the 15-odd stations 
in the New York area — from one-min- 
ute spots through two-hour disk jockey 



type music programs. 

The objective of all this saturated 
selling: invitations to Dynamic sales- 
men to visit listeners in their homes, 
and bring a TV set along. Home dem- 
onstrations are nothing new. Vacuum 
cleaner salesmen, to mention one 
group, have been doing them for years. 
But it took "Madman Muntz," fresh 
from his success in the used car busi- 
ness, to work out the successful for- 
mula now used by other retailers like 
Dynamic in New York and George's 
Radio Stores in Washington. SPONSOR 
reported the Muntz TV success storv in 
its 7 November 1949 issue ("Not so 
mad Muntz"). Dynamic and George's 
Radio Stores are using the Muntz for- 
mula enthusiastically, find it works for 
them as well. 

A staggering 95% of all those who 
phone to inquire about home demon- 
strations of Admiral TV sets, in an- 
swer to Dynamics radio plugs, make 
appointments for Dynamic salesmen to 
call. And a solid 50% of this number 
become cash customers. 

"Radio," says Dynamics Home, 
"gives Dynamic's salesmen-demonstra- 
tors a legitimate excuse to get into the 
home." This, of course, is enough for 
any salesman worth his salt. More 
than 100 Dynamic salesmen are kept 
busy throughout the day following up 
leads stemming directly from Dynam- 



ic's radio advertising. A battery of 15 
switchboard operators has all it can 
do to handle incoming calls from "live" 
prospects. "Radio opens doors for 
us," says Home. This has been 
brought home strikingly to Dynamic 
through occasional "cold canvasses" of 
neighborhoods where no specific leads 
are available. "Our salesmen find the 
ice has been broken ahead of them be- 
cause people are familiar with the Dy- 
namic name, thanks to our radio ad- 
vertising. Almost everybody knows 
who we are," he adds. 

This is one of the reasons Dynamic 
doesn't concern itself excessively with 
pinning down results from individual 
stations. "We've gotten plenty of re- 
sults attributable to radio even during 
periods when we had nothing on the 
air," Home points out. He explains 
that the value of campaigns such as 
Dynamic's cannot be gauged by direct 
and immediate results alone, as impres- 
sive as these have been. Each cycle of 
Dynamic air advertising generates 
waves of publicity and advertising car- 
ry-over which augments the selling job 
long after the commercials have been 
read. 

Dynamic buys time on network out- 
lets — the powerful New York "flag- 
ships" such as WCBS and WNBC— as 
well as independent stations. Home 



26 



SPONSOR 




MAGIC MR* * , 

TELEVISION. : ^____ 

4. ONCE IN THE PARLOR WITH A TELEVISION SET, SALESMEN HAVE LITTLE TROUBLE SELLING. 50% OF FAMILIES VISITED BUY 



says that while the quality and relia- 
bility of sales leads pulled by the net- 
work stations were superior, in some 
individual cases, to those stemming 
from the indies, the difference by and 
large isn't enough to warrant a rule- 
of-thumb judgment. Home is a be- 
liever in the practice of buying stations 
on individual performance and "per- 



sonality," rather than on power and 
affiliation. 

Most of Dynamic's radio buys are 
spotted in the mid-morning, afternoon, 
and early evening. Dynamic has 
learned that their best advertising tar- 
get is the housewife. While the pur- 
chase of a TV set is usually discussed 
at length !>\ all members of the fam- 



ily, it's Mom who usually has the final 
word. 

Unlike many other advertisers who 
use a bulk of spot announcements. Dy- 
namic has never cut transcriptions, 
preferring to do them live. Home feels 
that this is added insurance against 
commercial copy staleness — a factor to 
{Please turn to page 42) 




Selby's, St. Paul: this appliance dealer has five half-hour shows 
over WMIN, urging viewers to telephone for a TV set demonstration 



George's, Washington, D. C: George Wasserman, president of Wash- 
ington appliance firm, signs for more time on WNBW to push TV sets 



14 AUGUST 1950 



27 




Ray Bartlett, white d.j. on KWKH, Shreveport, proves it's programing that draws Negro fans 



Negro population in leading markets* 



Market 


Negro 
population 


Percent 
of total 


Estimated 
no. families 


Population 
per private 

household 


New York 


819,450 


9 c /o 


212,000 


3.5 


Chicago 


447,370 


10 


1 1 1 ,300 


4.0 


Philadelphia 


439,410 


13 


113,000 


3.6 


Detroit 


348,245 


13 


83,400 


4.2 


Washington 


285,988 


24 


68,000 


4.2 


Baltimore 


284,383 


22 


63,250 


4.5 


Los Angeles 


240,375 


6 


56,250 


3.2 


St. Louis 


239,470 


15 


67,000 


3.4 


Birmingham 


209,760 


42 


54,500 


3.9 


Newark 


195,552 


6 


48,100 


3.5 


New Orleans 


166,824 


28 


44,500 


3.6 


Memphis 


163,742 


41 


45,300 


3.6 


Atlanta 


142,885 


29 


40,400 


3.6 


Pittsburgh 


131,052 


6 


34,000 


3.7 


Cleveland 


110,000 


9 


27,500 


4.0 


San Francisco-Oakland 


102,465 


5 


26,000 


3.1 


Indianapolis 


79,740 


18 


19,935 


4.0 


Cincinnati 


62,940 


12 


15,735 


4.0 


Kansas City 


44,300 


10 


11,100 


4.0 


Tampa-St. Petersburg 


35,313 


20 


8,800 


4.0 




*Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1947, Series P-21. 



28 



The legro d.j 



Scores of stations roum 

sepia talent; her<^ 

in on a newly tappei 



Fifteen million people earn- 
ing $12,000,000,000 a year 
constitute a tremendous mar- 
ket. DeSpite this, a strange myopia 
prevents the bulk of advertisers from 
trying to reach it. 

sponsor (10 October 1949) pointed 
out the relatively untapped potentiali- 
ties of the Negro market in an article 
called "The forgotten 15,000,000." 
Since then additional evidence proves 
that programing aimed especially at 
Negroes sells heavily for national and 
local sponsors. 

Top salesmen are the disk jockeys 
throughout the country whose music, 
chatter, and distinctive personalities at- 
tract huge and loyal audiences. The 
d.j. may be white, he may be colored; 
the important thing is whether his pro- 
gram appeals to the majority of Negro 
listeners. Programing is the key. 

Here are some samples of what Ne- 
gro disk jockeys can do for sponsors: 

Jon Massey on WWDC, Washing- 
ton. D .C, sold 5,000 sets of $1.98 ball 
point pens for the Super Music Stores 
— all in a single week. 

Ned Lukens la white d.j. who calls 
himself "Jack the Bellboy" I promoted 
$4,000 worth of business for Jandel 
Roofing and Siding Co. with two spots 
a day on WEAS, Decatur, Ga. He has 
also helped add 15.000 new accounts 
for Hollywood Clothiers, who have 
sponsored him for two years. 

Sister Rosetta Tharpe, with a 15- 
minute record show called Songs of 
the South, sold 456 General Electric 
washing machines in 10 weeks over 
WDIA, Memphis. Maurice "Hot Rod" 
Hulbert sold 59 radio-wire recorder 



SPONSOR 



I\ALW 



I rikes it rich 



«' nation have 
,»w they're cashing 
arket 



combinations at $150 each for Scars 
Roebuck over the same station. 

In Santa Monica, popular Joe Ad- 
ams of KOWL arranged and promoted 
a March of Dimes Benefit. A total of 
1.800 tickets were sold for the 1,500- 
seat hall, and over 900 others were 
turned away. The same Joe Adams is 
responsible for 50'.; of the new ac- 
counts signed by Gray burn Clothes of 
Los Angeles since May 1949. Business 
has skyrocketed since the clothing 
store first began advertising, with as 
many as 400 new accounts opened in 
a single month. 

What makes Negro disk jockeys so 
popular? The popularity of music it- 
self is the biggest factor; people like to 
listen to blues, jazz. bop. Second in 
importance is the personality of the 
d.j. Most of them are unusually talent- 
ed, and often well-educated. Take Jon 
Massey of WWDC for example. A 28- 
year-old former Labor Dept. drafts- 
man, Massey was described in the 1945 
edition of The Avon Poetry Anthology 
as "one of America's most promising 
young poets."' Lorenzo Fuller MCs 
Harlem Frolics over WLIB, New York 
— when he isn't appearing in the 
Broadway show Kiss Me Kate. Fuller 
plays the piano, sings, and talks be- 
tween records. 

Several of WDIA's talented d.j.'s 
double as teachers in Memphis high 
schools. Nat D. Williams holds down 
several spots on the station, writes a 
syndicated column for the Pittsburgh 
Courier, and teaches history at Booker 
T. Washington High School. Another 
popular WDIA personality. A. C. 
"Moohah" Williams, teaches music at 
( Please turn to page 49 ) 




Booth and Lee Cavanaugh, local distributors, sign for 15-minute slot on "Spider" Burks show, KXLW 



I. Bettelou Purvis, white d.j. on WPGH, Pittsburgh 2. Ned Lukens, white "Jack the Bellboy", WEAS d.j. 
3. Santa Monica, Calif, s popular Joe Adams, KOWL f. Nat Williams, WDIA, Memphis, d.j., and guest 
5. Felix Miller spins platters on WDUK, Durham ft. Jon Massey, d.j. on WWDC, Washington, D.C. 




A SPO\SOR continuing study 



Radio is getting bigger 



Vior«' radio homes, more individual listening, 
less cost per thousand, revealed in 
studies of radio impact 



over-all 



During the past several 
weeks major studies by 
NBC and WHO. Des Moines, have be- 
come available to advertisers probing 
for the answers to these questions: 
'*Hovv much is radio reallv worth? 
How well is it doing in the family of 
advertising media'.''"* 

Radio is getting bigger! 

That's evident in the increased num- 
ber of radio homes; in multiple sets 
within the home; in individual set lis- 
tening in kitchen, bedroom, living 
room, workroom, barn; in more out- 
of-home listening; in declining cost 
per thousand. 

This doesn't mean that all stations 
offer advertisers more than they did 
one year or five years ago. Nor does 
it mean that the advertiser can afford 
to relax in his effort to make profitable 
use of the medium. A huskv segment 
of the radio broadcasting field is hav- 
ing Tough sledding: numerous pro- 
grams show a downward trend. 



^ et more advertisers than ever be- 
fore are reporting standout results. 
They're learning how to use radio . . . 
and they're being helped along by the 
fact that radio is getting bigger. 

For more than a year sponsor has 
presented its continuing study on the 
health of radio. Most of these analyses 
are contained in a 32-page booklet 
titled "Radio is getting bigger" avail- 
able free to subscribers on request. 

NBC presentation highlights ra- 
dio's growth. In a simple, factual 
presentation, NBC has marshalled pert- 
inent facts advertisers want to know 
about the dimensions of radio. Here 
are some of the standout statistics it 
includes: 

1. While U. S. families increased 
5 1 i million in the four years ending 
January 1950, radio families rose 6,- 
702.000. The radio family growth far 
surpassed that of newspapers, or tele- 
vision families, or the four top na- 
tional weekly magazines. 



RtttUo up: \ io Is t>n 

A telegram to SPONSOR from A. C. 
Nielsen arrived at press time. Ex- 
cerpts follow: "Radio listening snaps 
back coincident with interest in Ko- 
rea. . . . Radio usage for entire day 
now higher than last year. . . . Night- 
time listening currently on par with 
year-ago level, whereas during earlier 
months this year it had been off 10 
to 15%. Morning and afternoon lis- 
tening . . . now up 5 r 'c." That's the 
latest word from Nielsen, reinforcing 
the point made in the article below. 



2. From January 1946 to January 
1950. 54,000,000 radio sets costing 
four billion dollars were sold. 

3. In 1949. three radio sets were 
sold for every TV set. The RTMA re- 
ports pyramiding radio set sales in 
1950. ehiefh table a n d portable 
models. 

4. More money was spent last year 
for radio sets than for all newspapers 
and magazines combined. 

5. Based on Nielsen estimates, 
which rarely includes listening to 
more than two sets in a sample home, 
an average half-hour evening network 
radio program will have 6.7' ' less 
potential circulation this fall than in 
1948. But the marked increase of in- 
dividual set listening in the home, not 
fully measured by Nielsen, reduces 
this percentage. 

6. Fall 1950 will find 35,097,000 
exclusively radio families as compared 
to 10,000,000 TV families (practically 
all TV families also own one or more 
radio sets). 

7. Radio is truly national, saturat- 
ing all markets. Television this fall 
will reach 63 markets with an average 



XttC presentation proves radio is low cost, high power medium 



on a net t hon 



COST PER THOUSAND • BOSTON • MAY 1950 



*3.33 J3.43 



*3.59 



*1.92 





Network 
Radio 



Television 







the results 
ol a 4 media test 
by a 
premium advertiser 



10< 



23< 



39< 



market penetration of 35%. Radio 
reaches more than 95' , of all families. 

8. If all non-TV markets (such as 
Portland, Ore., and Denver) were 
lumped together the\ would equal a 
market seven times the size of New 
York City. 

The NBC study includes two impor- 
tant surveys, previously reported by 
sponsor, which revealed radio listen- 
ing as America's favorite leisure-time 
activity. Fortune magazine in 1949 
stated that 51$ of the men and .")!', 
of the women named radio listening 
when asked: "Which two or three of 
the things on this list I including many 
recreational activities I do you realh 
enjoy doing the most?" 

A 1948 Psychological Corporation 
study found that 85% of the people 
interviewed listened to radio on an 
average day, and that they spent four 
and a half hours doing so. Newspa- 
pers took only 58 minutes of their 
time. Only 25% read magazines, 
these for only one hour and four min- 
utes during the average day. Other 
figures in the P. S. study, confirmed 
by a recent Pulse survey, revealed that 
the average person who listened to the 
radio out-of-home spent 93 minutes do- 
ing so. During an average day, 28% 
listened to the radio away from home. 

The NBC presentation quotes the 
Dr. Lazarsfeld discovery that "radio 
advertising is better liked, commands 
more attention, registers better recall 
than printed advertising." Place and 
frequency of advertising is flexible in 
radio: it is not controlled by issue 
dates as with magazines and newspa- 
pers. The advertiser has no competi- 
tive advertising or editorial matter to 
distract him. Listening generally is 
[Please turn to page 34) 



Iowa listeners 


like the j 


oh nidio 


is doiny 
















Local 




Listeners' Appraisal 




Schools 


Newspapers 


Radio 


Government 


Churches 


"In this area they are 












doing" 














An excellent job 


1 1 .05% 


7.45% 


12.7% 


3.7 


21.7 


A good job 




59.8 


64.6 


70.0 


48.5 


65.6 


Only a fair job 


13.6 


19.5 


13.1 


23.3 


7.0 


A poor job 




1.2 


3.4 


1.2 


6.0 


0.6 


Don't know 




14.2 


5.9 


2.9 


18.4 


4.9 



Radio (iniiiu/ nearly 1 1 hours clctif •/ in average Iowa home- 

(Figures are total hours reported divided by number living in Diary homes) 





Total 

(Average 

Home) 


Average 
Woman 
Over 18 


Average 
Child 
12-18 


Average 
Child 
4-1 1 


Average weekday 


13.95 hrs. 


6.67 hrs. 


2.61 hrs. 


2.91 hrs. 


Saturday 


15.59 hrs. 


6.60 hrs. 


3.44 hrs. 


3.72 hrs. 


Sunday 


13.52 hrs. 


5.86 hrs. 


4.41 hrs. 


4.19 hrs. 



Otic* out of every two Iowa homes has more than one radio 




1940 Survey 


1945 Survey 


1950 Survey 


Percentage of all homes owning radios 


90.8% 


93.6% 


98.9% 


Percentage of radio homes owning: 








Only one set in the home 


81.8% 


61.5% 


51.2% 


Two sets in the home 


13.8% 


29.4% 


35.6% 


Three or more sets in the home 


4.4% 


9.1% 


1 3.2% 



"Above figures based on 1950 Iowa Radio Audience Survey conducted by Dr. F. L. Whan. 



Radio is growing faster than America 



Circulation increases between Jan. 1946 to Jan. 1950 



Radio Families 6.702.000 



All Daily Newspapers 




Tc people %vho have radio** nine to sell: 



How to profit by your 




rade paper advertising 



New booklet — 'The Happy Medium — of interest to 

• station managers • agency account execut ... 

• copy writers • buyers and sellers of radio and t> time 

• and other trade papers 

I 
TF'7 
(an for H 

e of the :t: ; Hiaoc - 




k& 






k": 

..." 







SPONSOR the shortest distance between buyer and seller 



(■■■■■ . I 




• 


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, 



RADIO IS GETTING BIGGER 

{Continued from page 31) 

easier than reading, sponsor's "Radio 
Results" feature attests to the selling 
power of the human voice. As SPONSOR 
also reported, when Dun & Bradstreet 
asked retailers. "What media would 
you recommend for a national adver- 
tising campaign?" radio was far and 
away the #1 medium. 

The NBC report gives a concrete 
example of the econoim <>! radio ad- 
vertising. A household item advertis- 
er, testing premiums in four media, 
discovered that radio delivered inquir- 
ies at the low cost of 10c each ; maga- 
zines were 13 limes more costly; daily 
newspaper four times more costly ; 
Sunday supplements more than twice 
the radio cost. 

To illustrate comparative media cost, 
NBC points out that for $21,000 an 
advertiser can buy a full NBC network 
half-hour evening program — time and 
talent. And for this sum he has 34,- 
000,000 families as his potential audi- 
ence. In order to match this circula- 
tion with newspapers, he would have 
to buy 1,145 of them, and this, of 
course, includes a lot of duplication. 
If he were to use magazines, he would 
have to buy the nine leading circulation 
magazines, again with a good deal of 
duplication. When he finished spread- 
ing his money around, this is the kind 
of space he could buy: 176 lines in 
1,145 newspaper or 1/6 page in nine 
leading magazines. Opposed to this, 
he could procure the impact of a full 
network half-hour evening program." 

A little known fact of the Hofstra 
study, unveiled in this presentation, 
shows network radio producing 72% 
more advertising impressions than TV 
per dollar spent. TV showed up sec- 
ond low. with Life, This Week and the 
Boston Post far more expensive. (The 
study was made in Boston.) 

Iowa radio study gives key data. 
The 1950 Iowa Radio Audience Sur- 
vey, conducted by Dr. F. L. Whan and 
sponsored by WHO, Des Moines, not 
onlj makes a year by year comparison 
of trends in listening, ownership and 
preferences, but also uncovers valuable 
new information about the habits of 
the Iowa audience. 

1. Among 9,001 Iowa homes que- 
ried in 1940, 91.4% had one or more 
radio receivers. In 1949, among 9,169 
homes, 98.5%, had one or more radio 
receivers. With 9,215 questioned in 
(Please turn to page 61 I 



How radio compared with newspapers in 
Pine Bluff competitive test 



K O T M 



SERVING SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS 



P. O. »OI *87 

PINE. E>L>UFF. ARK. 

July 29. 1950 



Sponsor Publications, Inc., 
510 Madison Avenue, 
New York 22, N. Y. 



Gentlenien: 



First let us extend our congratulations for the 
grand Job SPONSOR Is doing. We especially enjoyed the article 
"What Pulls 'em In" In the June 19 issue. Please advise whether 
reprintB are available, and the cost. 

You will probably be Interested in a local radio 
success story - a radio vs. newspaper pull- test conducted by 
Lea's Men's Store, 322 Main Street, Pine Bluff. 

This test was arranged by the writer and Mr. George 
Lea, owner of the store, and conducted by the salesmen In the 
store. The store has been an infrequent radio user in the past, 
their appropriation running about 5 to 1 In favor of newspaper, 
and Mr. Lea told us before the test that, he expected radio to 
come in on the "tall-end " of the deal. 

As you will note in the enclbsed copy of Mr. Lea's 
letter to us , radio made a very nice showing. 

You are welcome to use this letter, together with the 
facts contained in Mr, Lea's letter. 

Keep up the good work. More power to SPONSOR! 



Yours very truly, 
Radio Station K0TN 



(com'l. ngr. 



-c^e-, 



i 



July 27, 1950 



Radio Station K0TN 
Pine Bluff, Arkansas 

Gentlemen: 

We are pleased to report to you the following results of a "radio- 
newspaper" advertising test conducted in our store over a three-day 
period - Thursday, Friday and Saturday, July 13-14-15, 1950. 

Merchandise used: Men's Boxer Shorts - 790 

Per cent customers accounted for: 

Radio Newspaper Combination of both Other* 
36.0 14.0 6.0 44.0 



Per cent sales accounted for: 



Radio 
29.6 



Newspaper 
17.7 



Combination of both 
8.6 



Other 
43.9 



(*)0ther includes window display, etc. Since point of test is 
in very HIGH "Foot traffic" spot (considered 98J? location) it 
is very easy to see why our mass window display brought the "other" 
column up to such a high point. Also,. it is reasonable to be- 
lieve that inasmuch as the window as the last thing imnressed on 
the customer's mind before making purchase, a number of people ac- 
tually hroupht to the store by either radio or newspaper, gave cre- 
dit to the display. 

Method of procedure: As nearly as possible the exact amount of money 
was spent in each medium. After the sale was completed the customer 
was asked "What brought you in?" or " How did vou learn about this 
item?" Then, it was explained that a test was" being made. 

You will be pleased to note that your station, which was the only 
one used in this test, accounted for two and a half times as many cus- 
tomers as the newspaper. 

You may use this information for publication in your trade maga- 
zines if you choose. 

Yours very truly, 
LEA'S MEN'S STORE 



IN SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA TELEVISION... 

KRON -TV PUTS 
MORE EYES ON 

TELEVISED SPOTS 



. . .with 
this interest -ALL- 
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of programs that 
keeps folks dialed 
to Channel 4 



EVERY Week 

-•^RON-TV f a ^^JV 

a " these NBr ,n the S an F r » ■ 

' SHOWS C/^„ _. 3 TM>r »__ 



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6SH0 ^ F0RC HU DREN 
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Represented nationally by FREE & PETERS, INC. . . . New York, Chicago, Detroit, Atlanta, Fort Worth, 
Hollywood. KRON -TV offices and studios in the San Francisco Chronicle Building, 5th and Mission Sts., San Francisco 



14 AUGUST 1950 



35 





Mr. Parnas 



The 

picked panel 

answers 

Mr. Kathnian 

Yes, the purchase 
of radio and tel- 
evision on a net- 
work or spot ba- 
sis is, generally 
speaking, subject- 
ed t o m u c h 
tougher scrutiny 
from advertisers 
and agencies than 
is the buying of 
magazines a n d 
newspapers. And that seems logical. 
Magazines and newspapers are much 
older media than radio or TV and are 
therefore more familiar to the buyer 
and to those who must approve recom- 
mendations. The A. B.C. reports, the 
Starch Readership reports, the Contin- 
uing Newspaper Readership Studies by 
the Advertising Research Foundation, 
and the Magazine Audience Group 
studies provide the advertising profes- 
sion with fairly sound yardsticks to 
measure the worth of print media. 
While it is true that some of these tools 
are subject to criticism, their findings 
are on the whole generally accepted. 
Radio, on the other hand, while pros- 
pering greatly and providing the adver- 
tiser with a very effective medium, has 
too often been furnished very confus- 
ing research. First there was the con- 
troversy between the C.A.B. and Hoop- 
er. Then Hooper and Nielsen in radio 
and TV. And now, the debate between 
Hooper and The Pulse. The B.M.B. 
controversy is also still fresh in our 
minds. TV has as yet no generally ac- 
cepted measurement yardstick amd 



Mr. Sponsor asks... 



When media are selevtetl for a national cttmpaign. 
are railio and TV subjected to tougher scrutiny 
than magazines (iiicl newspapers? 



■ a ix «.l I V' ce president in charge of sales 

Irving A. Karhman | Eversh p arp , nc Chicag y 



there will, no doubt, be furious talk 
thrown around. While there has been 
much confusion, enough sound re- 
search has been made available to help 
make judicious purchases of radio and 
TV time, and programs. Unlike maga- 
zine and newspaper research, however, 
these yardsticks, such as the Nielsen 
and Hooper ratings for radio and TV 
and the various other studies are seen 
regularly and studied by many agency 
and client executives. Consequently, 
when decisions are to be made, many 
minds are consulted. Important also is 
the fact that a network radio or TV 
show usually involves a much greater 
financial outlay than a magazine or 
newspaper campaign and is much less 
flexible. Therefore, the tough scrutiny. 
Harry Parnas 
Media Director 
Cecil & Presbrey 
New York 

Yes. radio and 
TV are subjected 
to closer scrutiny 
than magazines 
and newspapers. 
primarily because 
you are dealing 
with what amouts 
to an intangible. 
Studies of audi- 
ence measure- 
ment a n d audi- 
ence classification are more difficult to 
obtain with accuracy than in the case 
of (publications. Probably one of the 
greatest drawbacks for the smaller 
sponsor is the inability to monitor out- 
of-town shows. Neither the agency nor 
client has the opportunity to listen in: 
performance cannot be checked prop- 
erl\ ; thus a good deal of faith is re- 
quired. Once an agency is sold on ra- 
dio or TV. the greatest hurdle remains 




Mr. Kane 



— namely selling it to the sponsor. Sell- 
ing radio to a sponsor is a fairly com- 
plicated matter what with difficulties in 
enumerating classes of time, talent 
charges, extra charges for transcrip- 
tions and so on. The potential sponsor 
gets so confused that it is difficult for 
him to figure out what the prospective 
plan is costing him. despite the agen- 
cy's facts and figures. It will take a 
considerable amount of time to edu- 
cate potential small time sponsors to 
lend a willing ear to radio and TV 
proposals. 

Lawrence Kane 
Executive Vice President 
Laurence Boles Hicks 
New York 



No, I don't be- 
lieve thev are. In 
the last few 
years, advertisers 
because of in- 
creased competi- 
tion and rising 
production costs, 
are more than 
ever endeavoring 
to make their ad- 
vertising dollar 




Mr 



f oung 



produce the greatest sales possible. As 
a result, all media are carefulh 
weighed in relation to the job to be ac- 
complished. Being older media, maga- 
zines and newspapers are naturally 
more familiar to most advertisers and 
therefore are subjected to less question 
as to their actual operation. However, 
once the "mysteries" are removed from 
television and radio for the advertiser 
new to these media, the application of 
them as well as all other media would 
be subjected to the same scrutiny as to 
coverage, cost, and ability to move the 
advertisers product. 



36 



SPONSOR 



Most agencies have on their stalls 
experts in all forms of media. It is a 
function of these experts to have com- 
plete knowledge and data on all me- 
dia, so that when campaigns are for- 
mulated all available data on a medi- 
um is presented. The amount of scru- 
tiny of a particular medium might be 
governed by the data available and the 
believabilitv and reliability of this in- 
formation. 

I do not believe that in a earefull) 
planned campaign. an\ one medium 
would receive any closer scrutiny than 
another. An agencj which is interested 
in the result of a campaign would cer- 
tainly see that all media received equal 
analysis and consideration in relation 
to the results which they hoped to ob- 
tain. 

Thomas H. Young 

Calkins & H olden, Carlock, 

McClinton & Smith 
New York 

I don't think so. 
In our organiza- 
tion, for instance, 
when the objec- 
tives for a par- 
ticular national 
k campaign have 

^H been agreed on, 

at each medium is 

^^^^ subjected to an 
upon all the ac- 
analysis based 
cepted facts and statistics available. 
The ability of each medium to accom- 
plish campaign objectives efficiently 
and economically is carefully weighed 
before decisions are made. However, 
while the scrutiny is equally tough for 
all media, the rapid growth of televi- 
sion and its effect on radio listening, 
magazine, and newspaper reading hab-| 
its pose many questions which need to 
be answered. We will continue to study 
carefully all the facts available about 
television and its resulting effect on all 
other media. 

James B. Daly, Jr. 
Assistant Director of Media 
Geyer, Newell & Ganger 
New York 




Mr. Daly 



Any questions? 

SPONSOR welcomes questions for 
discussion from its readers. Sug- 
gested questions should be accom- 
panied by photograph of the asker. 




The Newest, 
Most Complete 
AM Facilities- 
Comparable to 
the Nation's Finest! 





• From preliminary plans to proven performance, 
WDSU's new AM studios are the finest available... 
with the latest technical equip- 
ment including full recording 
facilities. For local New 
Orleans . . . or for nation- 
wide broadcasts . . . 
WDSU can successfully 
plan and produce out- 
standing radio shows! 

CALL JOHN BLAIR! 




14 AUGUST 1950 



37 



. 



THRIFTY 

Coverage 

of the South's largest 

ig 



WHBQ, Memphis, with 25 
years of prestige and know- 
how, presents its advertisers 
with a splendid coverage of 
this market of brilliant poten- 
tial . . . coverage that brings 
positive results for every 
penny invested. 

And our 5000 watt (1000- 
night) WHBQ (560 k.c.) is 
rate-structured to give you 
REGIONAL saturation at 
little more than what you'd 
expect the local rate to be! 

TELL US OR TELL WEED 
that you'd like additional 
facts re our 



-.8vfc 




This SPONSOR department features capsuled reports or 
broadcast advertising significance culled from all seg- 
ments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed. 

Adults corralled with kitls on WNBW's Rangers Club 

Hopalong Cassidy and the lesser mail with program sponsorship, 
cowpokes riding the TV range are the From the tiniest listening "ranch 
hottest thing in video, and sponsors are hand"' to the participating sponsors 




capitalizing on their appeal 

But some sponsors, while lassoing 
the small fry. have forgotten to corral 
the kids' parents. WNBW, NBC-TV 
in Washington, thought of everyone — 
sponsors, children and parents — when 
they got on the Wild West bandwagon. 

What they have evolved is the Cir- 
cle Four Roundup Rangers Club, a 
Monday through Friday film and daily 
club meeting. 

Psychologically, the Circle Four 
Club plays into the hands of parents. 
WNBW made up membership cards 
with four Circle Four Roundup Rang- 
er rules of good conduct. These rules 
of conduct give mother and father a 
free range to tell little Johnny he is 
not living up to the Circle Four rules 

for almost ANY minor violation of 
parental discipline. It's little touches 



and parents, everyone benefits from 
the activities of the Circle Four show. 

• • • 

CBS to launch biggest 
fall promotion get 

"This is CBS— The Stars' Address!" 

This phrase will keynote the biggest 

program exploitation ever undertaken 

bv a network and its affiliates. Direct- 




John Cowden explains CBS fall promotion plans 



*k-J 




Represented Nationally By WEED & Co 



ly benefiting, along with CBS and the 
90% of its member stations participat- 
| ing, will be sponsors of the 39 fall pro- 
grams to be promoted. Louis Haus- 
man, CBS V. P. in charge of sales pro- 
motion and advertising, will supervise. 
The campaign, beginning on 26 Au- 
gust and running into October, will in- 
clude over 1,000 separate announce- 
ments. These commercials will be used 
heavily on disk jockey and women's 
programs. Singing commercials have 
also been devised to tie-in with the 
WNBW cowboys show Circle Four Club brand campaign, emphasizing the return of 

nighttime shows after the summer hi- 
like this that build up parental good atug 

will for the program's sponsor. Last year 152,000 announcements 

To merchandise the show, WNBW were use( J j n the CBS fall campaign. 

had neckerchiefs with a Circle Four This year, according to CBS officials, 

imprint made up. Total sales on this the total will be even higher. 

test merchandising scheme came to 12,- Advertising will appear in some 300 

500 neckerchiefs at 25c each. newspapers and in national magazines 

WNBW has also built an index on as well. Fight half-pages are scheduled 

file cards of 20,000 youngsters with in Look; in October, the entire issue 

names, addresses and dates of birth, of Radio Mirror will be devoted to 

While the program features announce- CBS. 

ments, the list can be made available From August until October it will 

to any sponsor wishing to tie in direct be ". . . CBS — The Stars' Address!" 



38 



SPONSOR 



1VKVW salesman proves 
radio is getting bigger 

William Russell, salesman at WK- 
YW, Louisville, proves he knows how 
to combine pleasure with business. 









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Bill Russell sent out this birth-vertising order 

Recently, when Mrs. Russell gave 
birth to a boy, Mr. Russell sent out 
birth announcements in the form of an 
advertiser's order blank. 

Part of the text read like this: Name 
of Program — William Tucker Russell; 
Commercial Announcements — no extra 
charge for last minute changes; Live 
Talent — definitely; Continuity — 8 lbs. 
9% ozs.; Additional Instructions — 
script uses a great many loud sound 
effects, feed talent at frequent intervals. 
Net Station Time — 24 hrs. per day. 

Radio IS getting bigger. 



• • • 



I <»«• pressure commercials 
are music to WABF fans 

Slam-bang singing commercials sell 
many of radio's wares but WABF has 
proven the low-pressure commercial 
can also bring results. 

More than $25,000 in midsummer 
music festival tours to Europe have 
been sold via the low-decibel kind of 
commercials the station demands of its 
announcers. 

The tour itself is sponsored jointly 
by Thomas Cook & Sons and WABF. 
The New York FM station was the sole 
advertising medium for the $1,085 
tours. Station president, Ira A. Hirsch- 
man says, "This particular selling pro- 
gram confirms our knowledge that 
there is a large audience of ample fi- 
nancial means that can be sold only 
through commercials that appeal to 
them as individuals, not as faceless 
blocks of statistics." 



Mr. Hirschmann adds. '"There is an 
ever-growing group that can be 
reached by commercials that don't of- 
fend their good taste. I doubt that 
we'd have sold a single tour to our 
particular audience had we made the 
announcement in rhyme following a 
theme song." * * * 

Briefly . . . 

The State of Maine and the Maine 
Broadcasting System have combined 
promotionally to praise each other's 
advantages. The theme is "Anywhere 
you vacation in Maine you'll enjoy 
good radio reception from a Maine 
Broadcasting System station." A dis- 
plaj featuring WCSH, Portland, WL- 
BZ, Bangor, and WRDO, Augusta, oc- 
cupies a window at the State of Maine 
Information Bureau in the RCA Build- 
ing in New York. 

Two WJBK, WJBK-TV executives 
have received the first AMVET Distin- 
guished Service Awards presented in 
Michigan this year. Award recipients 
were Richard E. Jones, vice president 
and general manager of the Fort In- 
dustry Company's Detroit operations, 




War vets present service scroll to WJBK execs 

and Edmond T. McKenzie, assistant 
general manager and nationally famous 
as disk jockey, Jack The Bellboy. 
(There is another disk jockey also 
known as Jack The Bellboy. He is Ned 
Lukens of WEAS, Decatur, Ga. See 
page 28 of this issue. I 

WJMO, Cleveland, believes in giving 
the sponsor something extra. Warner 
Brothers ran transcribed announce- 
ments advertising The Flame and the 
Arrow with Burt Lancaster. To fur- 
ther the promotion, a WJMO staffer 
tape-recorded a series of one-minute 
interviews with Lancaster. The movie 
star explained his routine to be per- 
formed in a Cleveland theatre that eve- 
ning. 




9- 3 



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14 AUGUST 1950 



39 



FOOD MIXER 



SPONSOR: Natural Foods Institute AGENCY: Foster & Davie* 

i \PM i.k CASE HISTORY: The agency used a half 

hour program to introduce a $30 mixing machine to the 
llbuquerque market. Orders for the food mixer were 
taken by telephone after the program. As a result of this 
one program, orders were received for 56 units or a total 
oj $1,680 171 sales. Advertising cost for the show was 
S100 or approximately $1.78 advertising cost per every 
machine sold. 



KOB-TX . Albuquerque 



I'KMCKWI: Mixint: Machine 
Demonstration 



TV 

results 



BEVERAGES 



SPONSOR: Royal Crown 



AGENCY: BBD&O 



CAPSULE CASE HISTOR1 : The Royal Crown Bottling 

Company offered 3,000 beanie advertising hats as a pro- 
motion test. The day following the announcement the 
3.000 hats uere sold and the company was forced to resort 
to air express to replenish their stock. The company was 
quite impressed with the very immediate and tangible 
results of TV advertising and the cost to them was l%c 
per beanie requested. 



WHAS-TV, Louisville 



PROGRAM: Spot 



COUGH REMEDY 



HOUSEWARES 



SPONSOR: D. M. S. Co. 



AGENCY: Huber Hoge 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This direct sales company 

introduced a complete set of kitchen knives for the first 
time in Atlanta. Priced at $4.95 plus postage and C.O.D. 
( approximate total $5,721. The sponsor, without pre- 
vious advertising, sold 167 sets of knives after only three 
one-minute announcements. For $150 spent on TV, the 
advertiser grossed $826.65 or a $676.65 differential — and 
this without brand name establishment. 



WSB-TV, Atlanta 



PROGRAM: Open House 
With Mary Nell Ivey 



LAUNDRY 



SPONSOR: Star Laundry 



AGENCY: David W. Evans 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Star Laundry had a 

new idea, for packaging men's shirts so they wouldn't be 
crushed in suitcases. A two-minute film showed two men 
unpacking their cases. One shirt was crushed and wrin- 
kled. The other, packed by Star, was in perfect condition. 
The first film produced 16 new customers and the laun- 
dry places a hundred dollar evaluation upon each cus- 
tomer. The result: $1,600 worth of potential business 
from an approximately $23 announcement. 

KDYL-TV, Salt Lake City PROGRAM: Wrestling from 

Hollywood 



ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 



SPONSOR: Oster Manufacturing 



AGENCY: Ivan Hill 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORi : This advertiser went on 

the Tom Wallace Show, a participating program, the first 
time it was telecast {cost for a 1-2 1 >> min. demonstration 
$85 I . An electric vibrator and electric beater-mixer were 
shown. Within two weeks, Chicago State Street stores 
reported an average increase of 164% as compared to 
the pre-TV percentage oj the preceding six weeks. In ad- 
dition. 100 neu dealers uere added. 



WGN-TV, Chicago 



PROGRAM: Tom Wallace Show 



DISINFECTANT 



SPONSOR: The Glessner Co. AGENCY: Gunther-Brown-Bernie 

CAPS1 LE CASE HISTORY: This pharmaceutical firm 

wanted to acquaint the public with its Dr. Drake Cough 
Remedy. After only four one-minute announcements of- 
fering trial samples of the medicine plus a Lucky Penny 
souvenir, the sponsor received 1,982 requests. For this 
regional three-station deal on the Crosley TV network 
{WLW-T, WLW-D, WLW-C) this public acquaintance 
job cost $200. 

WLWT, Cincinnati PROGRAM: TV Ranger* 



SPONSOR: Klix 



VGENCY: Raymond Sines 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Two announcements ad- 

vertising Klix disinfectant were used on the Del Courtney 
Show [approximate cost $50). Three days after the first 
announcement. lc>0 mail requests came in for Klix. Four 
days after the second, 185 requests were received for the 
disinfectant. Thus, as a direct result of two one-minute 
announcements. 365 requests were received for the prod- 
uct in a short time. 



KPIX, San Francisco 



PROGRAM: Del Courtney Show 



Wrowing Tike YJagic 




The W DEL-TV audience 

in the rich 

Wilmington, Delaware market 

In twelve months of telecasting. WDEL-TV, 
Delaware's only television station, has been phe- 
nomenally successful in building a loyal, responsive 
audience. This amazing acceptance, together with 
the tremendous wealth of this market — fifth in per 
capita income — make WDEL-TV one of the nation's 
top television buys. In the first year of telecasting, set 
sales in its area have jumped more than 700%! 
Advertisers can depend upon a continuance of the 
prosperity of this market and upon an .ever-growing 
audience because of NBC network shows, skillful local 
programming and clear pictures. If you're in TV, don't 
overlook the unique profit possibilities of WDEL-TV. 

Represented bv 

ROBERT MEEKER ASSOCIATES 

Chicago San Francisco New York Los Angeles 

A Steinman Station 

WDEL-TV 

CHANNEL 7 
Wilmington • Delaware 



NBC 



TV • Affiliate 




14 AUGUST 1950 



41 



more 

about the PRN.. 

Q. What is the Pacific Regional 
Network? 

A. It is a combination of 48 radio sta- 
tions from every significant market in 
California — that provides all the ad- 
vantages of network radio, plus the 
flexibility of spot radio. 

Q. What type of stations make up 
the PRN? 

A. Stations selected from all of the 
four existing networks, or strong in- 
dependents — each chosen for the spe- 
cific market it covers, and for the 
LOCAL selling job it can do. 

Q. Must the advertiser buy all of the 
48 stations that make up the PRN? 

A. No. With the flexibility of spot buy- 
ing he may select any number from 
4 to 48 stations — to match his cover- 
age or his budget, or to augment and 
strengthen his present facilities. 

Q. Does the PRN provide complete 
California coverage? 

A. Yes ! With more stations than the 
other four networks combined, the 
PRN provides for the first time inten- 
sive coverage of every significant 
California market. 

Q. Granted that the PRN provides 
the flexibility of spot — what are its 
advantages over spot? 

A. Convenience and saving of time 
and effort in buying; use of a single 
program without the expense of tran- 
scriptions and handling; and most im- 
portant : a saving of 20% (plus 
frequency discounts J on time costs 
alone! (Plus important savings on 
transmission costs.) 

Q. How is the BIG new Pacific Re- 
gional Network being received? 

A. Most enthusiastically, thank you! 
Its efficient, economical coverage of the 
vast California market has found ready 
acceptance among many advertisers 
and advertising agencies. 

Q. How can I get more details about 
the PRN? 

A. For complete information, write. 
phone, or wire direct. 



PACIFIC 

REGIONAL 

NETWORK 



6540 SUNSET BOULEVARD 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 




CLIFF GILL 
General Manager 



HI. 7406 



TED MacMURRAY 
Sales Manager 



TV DEALERS SCORE 

{Continued from page 27) 

be guarded against in any campaign 
in which the frequency of announce- 
ment approaches the saturation point. 

This doesn't mean that the basic Dy- 
namic '"sell"" copy is changed often. 
The main selling points are seldom va- 
ried, in fact. But Home points out 
that the use of live commercials per- 
mits a flexibility of delivery you can't 
get with transcriptions. 

Announcers who do the Dynamic 
commercials are supplied with the ba- 
sic pitch and encouraged to ad-lib 
around it to their heart's content — just 
so they don't tinker with essentials. 
Thus the announcer can adjust the pre- 
pared commercial to his own individ- 
ual style. 

"Some announcers prefer a 'hard- 
sell' style, but others can do just as 
potent a job with the 'soft sell'." Home 
points out. "We find it works out best 
if we leave it to their own discretion." 

The chief selling points in Dynam- 
ic's "home demonstration" radio com- 
mercials for TV sets are the names 
"Dynamic" and "Admiral." and the 
phone numbers listeners are asked to 
call for a free demonstration. It's axio- 
matic in all direct-selling offers on the 
air that the more often the phone num- 
ber is mentioned, the better the results. 
A typical Dynamic spot mentions the 
number nine times — the New York 
number seven times and the New Jer- 
sey alternate number twice. Here is a 
basic "hard-selling" Dynamic commer- 
cial: 

"Dynamic Stores — leaders in televi- 
sion sales — now offer you the most 
spectacular values in all television his- 
tory ! Yes, the new 1950 Admiral mod- 
els are here! The television sets every- 
body s been waiting for . . . with new, 
sensational features . . . engineered to 
outperform any set, anywhere, anytime 
. . . At $70 less than any previous com- 
parable model! No wonder everybody 
wants the new Admiral! Prove these 
facts to yourself. Try it before you buy 
it! Just call Trafalgar 3-0305 and Dy- 
namic Stores will deliver the Admiral 
wonder set to your home for a free 
demonstration. See! Hear! Compare! 
I here is no cost. There is no obliga- 
tion. . . . 

"You've never seen anything like the 
new Admiral for beauty, for perform- 
ance, for low price. And you can own 
ii lor pin money, lor pennies a day . . . 
on Dynamic's cas\ payment plan. So 



call now. Trafalgar 3-0305. That's 
Trafalgar 3-0305. Dial TR 3-0305 for 
your free home demonstration tonight ! 
Everybody wants the new r Admiral, but 
only a limited number can be satisfied, 
because even Admiral, with the world's 
largest production, cannot satisfy the 
enormous demand for these new won- 
der values. Dynamic Stores. Americas 
largest Admiral dealers, are fortunate 
to be able to set aside a number of Ad- 
miral sets for free home demonstration 
daily. But it's first come, first served. 
Get your call in right away and be sure 
of your demonstration. The number 
again . . . Trafalgar 3-0305 — Trafalgar 
3-0305. If you live in New Jersev 
you'll find it easier to phone Market 
2-3191. That's Market 2-3191 in New 
Jersey and Trafalgar 3-0305 in New 
YorL Call now!" 

Dynamic bought its first radio time 
for Admiral TV sets about a year ago 
on two New York stations — WMCA 
and WMGM— scheduling a total of 
about 50 sipots a week across the board. 
Results were "surprising" from the 
start, according to Home. After that 
expansion followed a steady upward 
curve. Most of the Dynamic buys have 
been 10 and 15-minute segments, with 
a sprinkling of half-hour, hour, and 
two-hour disk programs. Weather re- 
ports and newscasts have also proved 
effective vehicles for Dynamic commer- 
cials. 

Dynamic came on the TV home dem- 
onstration scene just after Muntz TV, 
Inc. had begun to tap the lucrative 
markets in Chicago, New York, Boston, 
Detroit, Philadelphia. Washington and 
Baltimore. The Muntz approach in its 
present 20-odd markets is based on 
radio. About 90% of the advertising- 
budget (it was about S1,000,000 in 
1949) goes into AM advertising. This 
means between 15 and 20 spots a daj 
on each station in the campaign. 

Muntz finds a warehouse in the low- 
rent part of each market, turns it into 
a combination factory, showroom, and 
storage glpace. A fleet of white-panel 
trucks move in, and the staff of 200 
telephone operators, office workers, 
salesmen, and TV technicians starts 
operating in high gear. 

Like a deluge, the Muntz advertising 
barrage breaks on all sides. Skywrit- 
ing planes wea\c the Muntz name and 
slogans over many miles. Radio sta- 
lions. newspaper ads. and trucks do 
their selling job on the ground. Disk 
jockeys carrj much of the radio effort, 
with other "reach -made audience 1 " pr<»- 



42 



SPONSOR 



grams rounding out the schedule. Of- 
ten transcriptions will be used, featur- 
ing the voice of well-known announcers 
like Harr\ von Zell, Ken Carpenter, 
and Harlow Wilcox. The personal rec- 
ommendation of these well-known ra- 
dio personalities has a special appeal 
to listeners. 

The home-demonstration technique 
has worked successful!) Eor many oth- 
er dealers. In the Twin Cities of St. 
Paul and Minneapolis, the Selby Ap- 
pliance Co. expanded an initial half- 
hour show on WMIN into five half- 
hours a week. Their added twist to the 
sales technique: demonstrating a TV 
set before studio audiences. The for- 
mat of the Selby programs consists of 
plaj ing polkas and bright novelty num- 
bers. Commercials feature the tele- 
plume number which listeners should 
call to get a home-demonstration with- 
in the hour. Selby Appliance Co.'s suc- 
cess on radio has caused them to drop 
all black and white promotion. 

Friendly Frost Stores, a New York 
chain dealer in TV sets and other home 
appliances, is another outfit with big 
plans in the home-trial arena. RecentK 
thej signed a 52-week contract with 
New York's WINS, which guarantees 
the station a minimum of $150,000 in 
advertising revenues. Just what Friend- 
1\ Frost will sponsor is still indefinite. 
In Washington, D. C, George's Ra- 
dio and Television Co. began their tre- 
mendous broadcast advertising assault 
three years ago. Largest appliance 
dealer in Washington, Georges han- 
dles Philco and Admiral TV sets and 
Frigidaire products like refrigerators 
and dehumidifiers. It has frequently 
blanketed all four TV stations in the 
Capital city simultaneously — in addi- 
tion to heavy radio advertising. An- 
nouncements vary in number from 10 
to 200 per week, depending on seasons 
and holidays. 

George's estimated broadcast budget 
of close to half-a-million dollars a year 
pays for six sports programs on all 
four television stations in Washington. 
Three variety shows are carried; one 
each on WTTG, WNBW, and WMAL- 
TV. There is an NBC newsreel and a 
Sunday night feature film on WNBW, 
as well as three musical programs on 
the same station. Altogether, about 
25$ of the budget goes to AM and 
75$ to TV. 

Successful home-demonstration cam- 
paigns for TV sets, via broadcast ad- 
\ertising, have proven just as success- 
tul in other major American markets. 

• • • 



GET THE STORY... 



How just one 
announcement 
brought • • • 





10,000 

REQUESTS 



FOR 






It MASKS 



Holsum Bakery reports "Cisco Kid" 
is a terrific bread salesman! A 
single offer of "Cisco Kid" masks 
stampeded the kids. Although 
these masks were to be distributed 
by dealers, the following day, im- 
patient youngsters stopped Holsum 
trucks that same evening — de- 
manding masks! Next day, the 
entire supply of 1 0,000 masks was 
distributed! The station reports: 
"Could have used 40,000!" 

All over the country, the "Cisco 
Kid" is breaking sales records for 
many different products and serv- 
ices. Write, wire, or phone for 
details. 




SENSATIONAL PROMO- 
TION CAMPAIGN — from 
buttons to guns — is break- 
ing traffic records I 
This amazingly successful 
Vi-hour Western adventure 
program is available: 1-2-3 
times per week. Transcribed 
for local and regional spon- 
sorship. 




MS, 



Here's the Sensatio 

LOW-PRICED WES 

That Should Be On Your Station! 




® You'd be happy, too, if you 
watched a steady stream of 
vacationists piling into your 

£ hotel, at a 47% better clip 

^ than a year ago. 

a Especially when it's summertime 
and the Miami area — long 
famous as a winter resort — is 

$ booming with its biggest 

summer business in history. 
W 

® 

.And speaking of bigger business, the - 
metropolitan Miami area has jumped 
into 25th place among the leading 
areas of the nation in retail sales, with 
nearly $600,000,000.00 changing 
hands. 



* That makes Greater Miami a 
a choice marketplace for your 

products — no matter what you 
9 have to sell 

" And. no matter what you have 

g to sell, you can do it better, 

_ cheaper and faster by using the 


biggest sales force in Florida — 

the 50,000 watt voice of 

WCBS -far and away the 
v 

audience leader. 



ny Katz man will show you why 



/ 




RTS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS... 



(Continued from page 2) 

Looks like a 
bigger BAB 

Wit h NAB membership expressing its wishes in no 
uncertain terms, looks like bigger Broadcast Adver- 
t ising Bureau is in making. Maurice Mitchell, out- 
going Director, has suggested plan to separate BAB 
from NAB while raising $300,000 to $400,000 via 
dues route. Decision will be reached soon regard- 
ing basic organizational structure, with possibil- 
ity that minimum operating budget will see new set- 
up through its first months. Hope of NAB hierarchy 
is to sell membership on importance of long-range 
BAB planning to develop sales promotion arm into 
strong force like Bureau of Advertising of ANPA. 

NARSR directory lists 500 radio, 
71 TV stations by reps 

Second Annual Directory of Nation al Association of 
Radio Station Representa t ives lis ts 13 members w ith 
some 500 radio and 71 TV stations. An additional 
62 Canadian stations are served by NARSR members. 
For booklet, write NARSR, 101 Park Avenue, N. Y. 17. 

National TV diary service 
announced by ARB 

Am e rican Research Bureau, Washington, D. C. re- 
s earch firm now serving New York, Ph i ladelph ia, 
Baltimore, Washington, Cleveland, and Chicago, will 
s upply network ratings and audience composition for 
entire United St a tes on monthly basis begin n ing 1 
Oct o ber. Regular ARB viewer diaries will be placed 
in 2200 TV homes scientifically selected and lo- 
cated within 150 miles of TV signal. Samples will 
be changed monthly. New service designed to answer 
two basic questions: (1) How many people are watch- 
ing each show? (2) What kind of people are they? 

INS provides musical 
films for TV 

Cavalcade of world's greatest symphonies, scored 
and filmed for TV, will be made available via In- 
t ernational News Service's TV department and th e 
All Nations Producing Corp. INS will serve as 
sales agent and distributor of the musical films. 

List of sponsored 

TV net shows compiled 

Preview listing as of 4 August of sponsored TV net- 
w ork programs for fall has been compiled by th e 
E xecutive Radio Service, Larchmont , New York. 
Listing shows 135 TV programs scheduled. Of the 
total, 47 are new, 37 are returning from hiatus, 51 
have been running throughout summer: 50% of 47 pro- 
grams are sponsored by advertisers new to TV. 



44 



SPONSOR 




order today 



SPONSOR Publications Inc. 

510 Madison Ave., New York 22 

F lease send me attractive new binder for my issues of 
SFONSOR at cost of $4. 

Name 



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□ Two binders holding 26 issues $7 
] Payment enclosed Q Bill me later 



The new binder will easily hold a full six- 
month supply of issues. It is built of strong, 
durable material and opens flat to put every 
page within easy reach. Stamped in gold. 

1949 Index to stories in SPONSOR included 
with each purchase of new binder. 



A few bound volumes of the 1949 SPONSOR issues still available at $12.50 



WHAT AGENCY MEN SAY 

(Continued from page 21) 

another radio v. p. He brought up the 
startling case of the sponsor who com- 
plained his show was too commercial. 
The show was one designed to sell to 
women in the low-income brackets. 
Most agencies agree that to sell this 
group of women, lengthy pitches which 
pound home the message are necessar\ . 

''What makes you feel the show's too 
commercial?" the agency man asked 
the sponsor. 

"Well," was the reply, "my friends 



all tell me the commercials are loo 
long." 

"Who are your friends?" said the 
agency man, fishing for an answer he 
hoped to get. 

The answer, inevitably, was that the 
"boys'' at the golf club were the friends 
the sponsor meant. During the week, 
the "boys" are bankers, corporation 
lawyers, and presidents of firms. But 
on weekends they become golf-course 
radio experts. 

The agency man pointed the obvious 
moral: "You can't go by the opinions 
of well-meaning people who are too 



TWO 



CITIES -SOUTH BEND AND 
MISHAWAKA - ARE THE HEART OF 
THE SOUTH BEND MARKET 



The city of Mishawaka begins where the city of 
South Bend ends. They are separated only by a 
street. The two cities form a single, unified mar- 
ket of 157,000 people. 

Be sure to count both cities when you study 
this market. It makes a big difference. Here's 
how: in 1948, South Bend ranked 90th in the 
nation in food sales, with a total of $36,129,000. 
But when Mishawaka's 1948 food sales are added, 
the total becomes $45,385,000— and South Bend- 
Mishawaka jumps to 69th place! A similar pic- 
ture is reflected in all other sales categories in 
this two-city market. 

Don't forget, either, that South Bend -Misha- 
waka is only the heart of the South Bend market. 
The entire market includes over half-a-million 
people who spent more than half-a-/>/'///<w dollars 
on retail purchases in 1948. 

And only WSBT covers all of this market. 




PAUL H. RAYMER 



5000 WATTS 
COMPANY • NAT 



960 KC • CBS 
ONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



well educated, fed, and housed to have 
the common touch. It takes specialists 
who have trained themselves to think 
in terms of a mass audience and who 
have available research tools to guide 
them." 

In both radio and television, basic 
ignorance of the broadcast media 
causes as much trouble as the spon- 
sor's failure to be objective. A time- 
buyer from one of the top ten agen- 
cies pounded his desk and burst out 
with this statement: 

"I wish there was some way we 
could educate clients about spot radio. 
They have foolish prejudices which get 
in the way when you start picking sta- 
tions for an announcement campaign. 
Some of them, for example, have the 
idea that announcements are no good 
unless they're aired on weekdays. Oth- 
ers want us to forget the second and 
third stations in a market. They place 
too great a reliance on over-all ratings 
and forget that the second or third sta- 
tion may be best for specific purposes." 

This timebuyer, an ordinarily ur- 
bane and soft-spoken young executive, 
got even hotter under the collar when 
he described another timebuying prej- 
udice. "Some clients," he said, "suit 
their own bedtimes to my station 
schedules. They tell me not to buy 
lime after 10:30. But 6-10 p.m. may 
be impossible to crack in some mar- 
kets. And a period at 11 p.m. may be 
ideal because of its adjacency to a lo- 
in inute news show." 

Another foible of sponsors men- 
tioned by several agency men involves 
their insistence upon studying every 
announcement time buy before allow- 
ing the agency to go ahead with it. 
This is usually foolhardy when good 
times are at a premium. One timebuy- 
er said he had a long list of top avail- 
abilities drawn up for a client with a 
seasonal commodity. If the client had 
had his way, there'd have been a day 
or two of deliberation before the time 
was bought. But the timebuyer fought 
for and got immediate approval. 

Otherwise," he pointed out, "com- 
petitors of the client might have bought 
some of the availabilities we picked 
out. But, because they fail to under- 
stand the nature of spot radio time- 
buying, other clients go on slowing up 
the works and risking the loss of good 
schedules." 

An executive whose name is known 
to almost everyone in the industry said 
that "he had yet to meet a sponsor 
who realized the preparation and pre- 



46 



SPONSOR 



testing necessary to put on a good IV 
show or produce a good film." 

This TV executive contrasted the vis- 
ual medium with radio. "\ou can 
walk into a radio studio at three 
o'clock," he said, "find you don't like 
the commercial and just throw it away. 
You get a new one written that after- 
noon, by 7:00 it's rehearsed, and it 
goes on the air successfully at 8:00. 
You can't do that with visual commer- 
cials. They have to be staged so that 
ideas are put across in picture situa- 
tions. And visual thinking and stag- 
ing take far more time than is neces- 
sary to write and rehearse a minute of 
spoken copy. ' 

All agencv men emphasized that 
sponsors had to take the time factor 
into account when working with TV. 
"Forget the last-minute change habit," 
was their advice. And "plan ahead, for 
God's sakes," was a second plea. 

A successful TV v.p. explained the 
advantages of long-range thinking in 
production of TV films. He said that 
every day you cut from a film produc- 
tion schedule means that much less film 
quality. And every extra day spent in 
planning, is money saved. 

One of the most astute young TV 
veterans, in an agency which handles 
several top television shows, warned 
that sponsors must stop thinking of TV 
as straight advertising. "A commer- 
cial on television," he said, "is really 
like the first call of the company's 
salesman. This first call must be fol- 
lowed up by salesmen or it's wasted.' 

Several TV-wise executives warned 
that a few sponsors are wasting TV 
money in markets where they have lit- 
tle or no distribution. This happens 
when an advertiser buys a full TV net- 
work which includes cities where he 
does not sell his product. The ad- 
men's advice : don't throw away TV's 
impact in those markets. Use it to 
force new distribution. 

Because sponsors do not understand 
television as well as they do radio, 
most of the executives quizzed felt that 
more frequent advertiser-agency meet- 
ings to discuss TV were a necessity. 

Though agency complaints about im- 
possibly short deadlines were more fre- 
quent when TV was discussed, the same 
point was raised about radio. 

Frequently, ad managers call the 
timebuyer and ask for station availa- 
bility data "in half an hour because 
we're in a meeting." Recently, one 
timebuyer was asked to draw up a list 
of 20 markets in which there were 




With 28 years of top flight sales effort 
on behalf of America's leading ad- 
vertisers, WGY continues to domi- 
nate the vast Northeastern market 
covering upper New ^ ork State and 
western New England. 



Here are the facts: 



WGY's total weekly audience is 2Vi times greater than 
the next hest station day and night. 

WGY has 10% more total audience than a combination 

of the ten top rated stations in the area. 

WGY covers 54 counties daytime — 51 at night. The 
next best station covers 14 day — 13 night. 

WGY has almost twice as many counties in its primary 
coverage as any other station in the area has in its 
entire coverage. 

WGY has 9 comities in its primary area which are not 
reached at all by any otlier Capital District station. 

WGY — and only WGY — can deliver audiences in 21 
major metropolitan markets with coverage in 5 north- 
eastern states. 

* Source Broadcast Measurement Hurean Study 2. S|iriii(£ 1949. 



All in all, your hest dollar for 
dollar value is WGY covering more 
markets — more audience — with 
more power than any station in 
its area — at lower cost than any 
combination of those stations to 
reach the 21 markets. 




A CENERAE ELECTRIC STATION 



14 AUGUST 1950 



47 



TOM, DICK & HARRY 

have received over a million letters and post-cards indicating that both 
women and men enjoy listening to their zany radio "crack robatics." A 
well arranged combination of novelty and old favorite tunes well spiced 
with comedy, TOM, DICK 8C HARRY is a fresh and listenable variety 
show. It is the type of show which has been tried and proven — proven 
that it sells! 

The following transcribed shows now available: — 



• TOM, DICK & HARRY 

156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 
156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 
156 15-Min. Hymn Programs 

• DANGER! DR. DANFIELD 
26 30-Min. Mystery Programs 

• STRANGE ADVENTURE 
260 5-Min. Dramatic Programs 



TELEWAYS 



• CHUCKWAGON JAMBOREE 

131 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• STRANGE WILLS 

26 30-Min. Dramatic Programs 

• FRANK PARKER SHOW 

132 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• MOON DREAMS 

156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• BARNYARD JAMBOREE 
52 30-Min. Variety Programs 



RADIO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



Send for Free Audition Platter and LOW RATES on any of the above shows to: 
8949 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 46, Calif. 

Phones CRestview 67238 — BRadshaw 21447 




TRIBUNE TOWER OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Represented Nationally by Burn-Smith 



good woman's participation program 
availabilities. He had only an hour to 
work on it. 

"A request like that,"' said this time- 
buyer, "drives me crazy. All I could 
do in that short time was pick a list 
out of the files. The normal procedure 
would he to call the reps and get up- 
to-date lists from them with a complete 
background on each program. To do 
a good job. I needed at least a dav and 
a half." 

One of the worst morale destroyers 
in an agency radio-TV department is 
the sponsor's tendency to focus on de- 
tails rather than the whole show or 
commercial. 

'"When a nice, intelligent guy be- 
comes a sponsor," one v. p. explained, 
'"all his perspective as a listener or 
viewer tends to go out the window. \\ e 
work like dogs to produce a good show 
or commercial. Then we put it on for 
him. The total effect may he terrific, 
but he's likely to focus on some detail 
like the sound effects or shading of the 
film. When he complains that the 
sound of a slamming door isn't quite 
right, we feel punk. And what's more 
we know that's not a typical listener 
reaction. It's just a case of the sponsor 
becoming h\ per-sensitive." 

All the agency people contacted were 
in favor of frequent sponsor attend- 
ance at radio or TV shows. The con- 
sensus was that the sponsor's presence 
at the show made everyone leel he was 
interested and provided encourage- 
ment. In particular, the sponsor's vis- 
its to a TV show- were considered con- 
structive since there's so much to be 
learned about the new medium. 

But the sponsor s visits are some- 
times a threat: he may become too 
friendly with the big-name talent. 
When that happens, the advertiser 
tends to get into the habit of praising 
or criticizing the talent directly. It s 
only natural to start chatting with the 
announcer and then hand out your own 
opinion of his work. But sponsors who 
do this ma\ only weaken the director's 
control of the show. All criticism or 
praise should come through channels. 

From sponsor's conversations with 
agency men. the following pleas to 
sponsors emerge : 

1. If you don't trust us. get another 
agency. Normal supervision is your 
duty, but don't overdo it. And don't 
assume we've made suggestions to suit 
our convenience. We're after sales, 
just as you are. and we profit when 
you do. 



48 



SPONSOR 



2. Don't expert us to death. We 
value your opinions, and many of them 
are valuable. But, please, don't quote 
your wife or golfing cronies on the ef- 
fectiveness of a show. Don't let per- 
sonal feelings replace objectivity. 

3. Let us in on your thinking more. 
We want to know your company's over- 
all objectives. Too often, we deal with 
men who aren't on the decision-making 
level. Then all of our thinking becomes 
short-range. 

4. Assign men to work with the 
agency who have at least a little knowl- 
edge of what we're doing. A former 
agency production man, for example, 
is ideal as the agency's contact on pro- 
duction questions. 

5. Learn the fundamentals of radio 
and TV. And remember that cardi- 
nal rules differ between the two me- 
dia. Radio commercials, for example, 
must pound a point home by verbal 
repetition. But this isn't the case in 
TV where the pictures carry the bur- 
den. When you see what looks like a 
naw in our thinking, let's discuss it. 

6. Build your plans on a firm foun- 
dation. Sometimes advertisers go off 
half-cocked. This is especially true in 
TV where some sponsors have bought 
expensive franchises which they prob- 
ably won't keep. These advertisers, 
who may have given up good radio 
schedules to enter TV, are building 
their advertising on quicksand. 

7. Be realistic about deadlines. If 
you give us enough time for produc- 
tion of a film commercial, for exam- 
ple, we can save you money by seek- 
ing out the lowest-cost producer and 
by doubling up our shooting schedules. 

That's the word from the ad-men. 
Are they themselves "objective" about 
sponsors? Of course not. Their think- 
ing is conditioned by day-to-day irri- 
tations. But, even if exaggerated, their 
criticisms are worth mulling over. 

Probably no sponsor who reads this 
will find that he's been guilty of all the 
sins mentioned. Agency men them- 
selves point out that the George Wash- 
ington Hills among sponsors are the 
exception. But all sponsors can benefit 
from a reexamination of their rela- 
tions with agency radio and TV de- 
partments; and a long look at their use 
of the broadcast media. 

Next round: what the sponsors say 
about their agencies, (sponsor will 
welcome letters on the subject from its 
readers with the understanding that the 
source and identifying details of all 
comments will be kept secret. * * * 



NEGRO DISK JOCKEYS 

[Continued from page 2 ( ) I 

Manassas High School, also trains a 
group of Negro teen-agers known as 
*'Teen Town Singers." 

Music, of course, is the backbone of 
disk jockey programs. Here is a run- 
down of what Negro d.j.'s find most 
popular with their listeners: 

Joe Adams, KOWL, Santa Monica — 
"Some bop, a great amount of popu- 
lar jazz and ballads, and a little semi- 
classical music. The trend has been 
awav from bop. toward dance music." 



Lorenzo Fuller. \\ LIB, New York — 
Sings and plays the piano in addition 
to playing everything from bop to 
blues; seldom uses semi-classical or 
classical music. 

Ted Bryant, WDXB, Chattanooga— 
"Primarily race records offering a va- 
riety of boogie woogie, jive, jazz, and 
blues." 

Dwight "Gatemouth" Moore, WDIA, 
Memphis — "Spiritual and gospel rec- 
ords."' 

"Hot Rod" Hulbert, WDIA— "Plays 
the blues, jive, and boip, with a special 
appeal to the teen-agers." 



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Second Low In Cost Per Inquiry . . 

"It gives me a great deal of pleasure to be able 
to tell you that in the recent Robin Hood mail pull, 
the offer of a picture and a poem for 10c, KTBS 
ranked sixth in a list of twenty-one stations. Of the 
five stations ahead of you, four were 50,000 watts 
in power. 

"On the basis of cost per piece of mail received, 
KTBS was the second low station. The only one with 
a better record based on cost was a 50,000 watt 
station nationally known for its widespread mail 
audience." 

Jim Anderson, CROOK ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Dallas, Texas 

Nearly A Million Baby Chicks Sold 

"We wish to take this opportunity to thank all of 
you at KTBS for the fine cooperation and the 
splendid selling job you have done for our Mason's 
Baby Chicks. 

"We find that your station has sold 982,800 baby 
chicks at a cost per hundred chicks that rates No. 4 
among our 120 radio stations used throughout the 
country." 

Ruth Mason , President, MASON'S CHICKS, INC., 

South Plainfield, N. J. 



THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE 
SHREVEP0RT, LOUISIANA 

10,000 WATTS 710 KC 



(5,000 NIGHTS) 

AFFILIATED WITH NBC AND TEXAS QUALITY NETWORK 
REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY, INC. 



14 AUGUST 1950 



49 




in Dollar Value 




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Represented By 

FORJOE & CO., INC. 

T. B. Baker, Jr., General Manager 



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•'Jack the Bellboy" (Ned Lukens), 
WEAS, Decatur, Ga. — "Strictly a jive 
show, exclusively featuring records by 
Negro artists. Includes be-bop, blues, 
barrelhouse, boogie, and dixieland."' 

Felix Miller. WDUK, Durham, N. C. 

"No attempt to play entire programs 
of so-called "race music." Instead, a 
happy medium with Ellington, Eck- 
stein, Vaughn. Basie, Shearing, Gar- 
ner, Goodman, Kenton, Shaw and oth- 
ers. 

Jon Massey, WWDC, Washington, 
D. C. — "Music is selected chiefly by 
mail, comprises everything from bop 
to classics." 

Bill Cook, WAAT, Newark— "On 
Musical Caravan we try to blend the 
best in popular music with interesting 
interviews of top name personalities 
from stage, screen, and radio." 

Certainly music is the top attraction. 
But it's the disk jockey's personality 
that gives this type show its big plus 
value. Depending on the ability of an 
individual d.j., the iplus values can be 
clever patter, a continual parade of in- 
teresting guest artists, or frequent per- 
sonal appearances. 

On most platter programs there isn't 
much time for talking. But what is said 
can be brightened up to a high polish. 
Take Bettelou Purvis, attractive white 
d.j. on WPGH, Pittsburgh: "I try to 
promote rhythms in my chatter. For 
instance, 'See you again tomorrow at 
5-1-5, when the shellac shack again 
looks alive." Slang terms heard among 
jazz musicians are used most often. 
Frequently the disk jockey will dig 
up some background on records and 
recording artists to pass on to listeners. 

Being busy people, disk jockeys of- 
ten find material for chatter in their 
other activities. Lorenzo Fuller, who 
handles Harlem Frolics on WLIB, New 
York, draws on backstage happenings 
at Kiss Me Kate. Besides this he com- 
ments on anecdotal material appearing 
in morning papers, especially news 
about the theatre, Broadway, and Har- 
lem. Many d.j.'s, like Jack the Bell- 
boy, use part of their program to an- 
nounce meetings and activities of Ne- 
gro social and civic clubs. On the 
Jack the Bellboy show this is called 
"The Bulletin Board." 

Most d.j.'s are themselves active in 
the musical field. This brings them in- 
to close contact with recording artists 
who are only too glad to boost their 
popularity with guest appearances. Er- 
nie Bringier of WMRY, New Orleans, 
frequently interviews artists like Smi- 



ley Lewis, Cecil Gant, Billy Diamond. 
Jimmy Hensley. Heavy fan mail simi- 
larly followed Felix Millers interview 
with Decca recording artist Buddy 
Johnson on a recent WDUK, Durham, 
N. C, stanza of Velvet Jazz. 

WDIA's large staff of Negro disk 
jockeys make a point of welcoming ar- 
tists who visit Memphis, often appear 
on the stage of a theatre where the vis- 
itor is playing or help MC his show. 
Its a reciprocal arrangement that helps 
them both. 

Negro disk jockeys, more often than 
not, are celebrities in their own right. 
Roy Loggins does a five-day stint on 
KALI, Pasadena, yet finds time to visit 
Los Angeles veterans' hospitals, fan 
clubs, and he makes weekly theatre ap- 
pearances. Joe Adams, busy d.j. on 
KOWL, Santa Monica, runs the annual 
Cavalcade of Jazz at Wrigley Field in 
Los Angeles. The last one packed in 
20,000 spectators. Ted Bryant was fea- 
tured in a film by All American News, 
a Negro newsreel company, for his 
disk jockey efforts over WDXB, Chat- 
tanooga. 

Here's what Bettelou Purvis, white 
d.j. of WPGH, Pittsburgh, has to say 
about outside appearances: "I appear 
at everything going. I was awarded a 
lovely scroll at the George Shearing 
concert, along with two other jockeys, 
which commended us on our promo- 
tion of racial relations through the me- 
dium of modern jazz. I attend the one- 
nighters when the bands pass through, 
local promotion projects, and charity 
balls. There is definitely a noticeable 
effect on my following because of this." 

Jon Massey, WWDC's popular Ne- 
gro d.j., backs this up: "My outside 
appearances include schools, churches, 
clubs. YMCA. nightclubs, theatres, etc. 
1 manage as many as 15 to 20 appear- 
ances per week. I find it's the best 
possible public relations, not for me 
alone but also for the station. As a re- 
sult, my fans are the most loyal one 
could possibly wish for." 

Nat Williams, veteran WDIA jockey, 
has planned. MC'd, and publicized 
nearly every Negro charity event in 
Memphis during the past 15 years. 
Says WDIA: "The entire staff pre- 
pared a benefit Christmas show in lit- 
tle more than a week's time, and staged 
it. without a rehearsal, before a packed 
auditorium. WDIA plans to make it 
an annual event." 

Another audience-builder used by 
some Negro disk jockeys is the gim- 
mick. In the case of WWDC's Jon 



50 



SPONSOR 



Massey, this is the $100 Lucky A um- 
ber craze which recently swept parts 
of the country. Listeners win by 
matching the numbers on their Social 
Security cards with a number read 
over the air. It was this gimmick 
which gave Massey the nickname Jon 
($100) Massey. 

Jack the Bellboy uses two quiz gim- 
micks on his WEAS, Decatur. Georgia 
show. Hollywood Clothiers asks a daily 
question, which listeners to Jack the 
Bellboy call in and answer at a given 
signal. First one to call in the correct 
answer wins. Macey's Jewelers plays a 
well-known record by a Negro artist 
backwards for their quiz. Both spon- 
sors post answers in their stores, relport 
substantial sales. 

Gimmicks are the exception on Ne- 
gro disk jockey shows, but most d.j.'s 
use similar approaches to commercials. 
The friendly, conversational approach 
is usually most effective. Ad libbing. 
often with a personal endorsement, is 
common, and aids sales. 

WDIA, Memphis, a pioneer in pro- 
graming especially for a Negro audi- 
ence, comments on advertising meth- 
ods: "It has been our experience that 
the most successful advertising is in- 
tegrated into the program — is given in 
the mood and spirit of the show in the 
disk jockey's own words. WDIA's 
commercial copy tries to be down-to- 
earth, informal, with a direct relation 
to the Negro's every-day life. The disk 
jockey is encouraged to add his own 
personal phrases to the copy, and 
change it to suit his show and listeners. 
But he must stick to the essential sell- 
ing points, give the price clearly when 
a price is mentioned, and stress the 
brand name." 

On the question of brand names, 
stations which have carried Negro pro- 
grams are emphatic: the Negro people 
are brand conscious. This stems from 
past and even some present exploita- 
tion of the Negro market by sub-stand- 
ard products. WDIA reports that many 
Negroes have told them they are proud 
that well-known brands like Stokely's 
Foods and Calumet Baking Powder 
buy time on the station. Further evi- 
dence of brand consciousness is con- 
tained in a report on the Negro mar- 
ket by the Research Company of Amer- 
ica. This shows, for example, that in 
the Northeastern United States, most 
Negro automobile buyers prefer Bu- 
icks, Goodyear Tires, Esso Gasoline 
and Esso Motor Oil. 

There is a difference of opinion as 



to whether certain specifically Negro 
products should be advertised on Ne- 
gro disk jockey shows. Ted Bryant, 
WDXB d.j. in Chattanooga, is spon- 
sored by Hadacol, Royal Crown Hair 
Dressing. Scalf's Indian River Medi- 
cine, Murray's Products, Nix, and 
Silky Strait. Several of these products 
are of the "hair straightening" variety 
which many Negroes find embarrass- 
ing, except in strictly Negro publica- 
tions. With sizable white audiences lis- 
tening to Negro disk jockey programs, 
the risk of alienating Negro listeners is 
considerable. 



Phil Gordon, WWRL New York disk 
jockey, won't plug this kind of prod- 
uct. He feels that the program is aimed 
at people who like blues, bop. calypso 
and so on. Besides, many of his loyal 
listeners are white teenagers. The ma- 
jority of Negro disk jockeys, and white 
d.j.'s aiming at a Negro audience, 
agreed that this type of advertising 
was better suited to printed media. 

Phil Gordon's teen-age white audi- 
ence in New York, Jon Massey's in 
Washington, and Joe Adams' white 
fans in Los Angeles all add up to an 
important fact. Music has a universal 




Yes, here is buying power that will do a 
sales job for you when you invest in WBNS 
time because this station is the favorite in 
radio with 187,980 central Ohio families . 
Results are what you want and results are 
what you get . . . This has been proved again 
and again by WBNS advertisers. 

ASK JOHN BLAIR. 

POWER WBNS 5000 - WELD 53,000 CBS COLUMBUS, OHIO 



14 AUGUST 1950 



51 



appeal and a personable Negro disk 
jockey is just as apt to build a large 
white audience as a large colored one. 
Jon Massey has done this in Washing- 
ton where 50% of his $100 Lucky 
Number winners have been white. Phil 
Gordon and Joe Adams have surprised 
many a young listener when pointed 
out at a personal appearance. The 
shift isn't one-way either. There are 
a surprising number of white disk 
jockeys whose competent handling of 
record shows has built large and loyal 
Negro audiences. 



1 he main point to be gained from 
this change in the caliber of Negro 
radio talent is to recognize the changes 
that have taken place generally. Amer- 
ica's 15,000,000 Negroes are a potent 
force, especially in the market place. 
Give them the first class selling job 
that a $12,000,000,000 annual income 
warrants and they'll respond. 

The experience of WPAL. Charles- 
ton, is a dramatic example. Disk jock- 
ey Bob Nichols has, in a little over a 
>ear, expanded his two shows from ^4- 
hour to 16-hours a week. Mr. L. P. 




< 



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No other advertising medium can as ef- 
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Drug Store at Fairbanks, com- 
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brands, is typical of a host of modern, up-to-date 
retail outlets in the NEW Alaska— an established 
and important new market of unusual responsiveness. 



MIDNIGHT SUN BROADCASTING CO. 

KFAR, FAIRBANKS KENI, ANCHORAGE 

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5546 White-Henry-Stuart Bldg., Seattle New York • Chicago 



Moore, WPAL Station Manager, de- 
scribes what happened: "It wasn't easy 
to put Bob Nichols over. We pioneered 
in this field and naturally got a lot of 
ridicule. The smile is on the other side 
of the face now. We acknowledged the 
presence of an audience heretofore vir- 
tually ignored — and, believe me, it's 
paid' off and paid off BIG!" * • • 



CHILD'S INFLUENCE ON TV 

[Continued from page 25) 

homes with children than in homes 
without children (see chart accompa- 
nying this story) . 

I In evaluating the Columbus study, 
it must be remembered that Columbus 
may not be typical. Nor can we esti- 
mate the importance of the novelty fac- 
tor of TV on children, who may be 
much more influenced by it than adults 
on a short-term basis.) 

It was to be expected, as shown by 
a chart accompanying this story, that 
viewing in homes with children would 
be greater than in those without dur- 
ing the afternoon. A big surprise is 
the extent to which children influence 
sets-in-use right up to 8 :00. After that 
adults-only homes lead slightly in this 
respect, but the votes of the youngsters 
still show up strongly in choice of pro- 
grams right on up to 9:30. 

Neither was it a surprise to note that 
programs broadcast in the late after- 
noon and early evening and aimed pri- 
marily at children — Lone Ranger, Cap- 
tain Video, Howdy Doody, and others 
— get much better ratings in homes 
with children than in other homes. 

But it's something else again to dis- 
cover that what the children think 
about the type of show intended pri- 
marily for adult viewers makes so big 
a difference in the number of pros- 
pects who dial a sponsors program. 

This ties in with what samplers of 
agency fan mail have long suspected. 
They don't have time, they say, to sort 
out the kid maii from all other mail: 
usually letters are merely stacked in 
"favorable" and "unfavorable" piles. 
But they know from spot checking that 
kids write in to performers on presum- 
ably adult shows. 

For more direct evidence, here s a 
letter a mailman wrote Look Hear, a 
TV fan column in the New- York News: 
"When your kids keep plaguing you 
to buy something a TV star has been 
selling, it's no use holding out — you 
might as well shell out the dough." 



52 



SPONSOR 



And kids are the highest pressure 
salesmen of all when it comes to con- 
verting non-television families into set 
owners, according to a checkup by Jay 
& Graham, Chicago, Videodex TV rat- 
ings. 

To return to the Ohio State study: 
Not surprisingly, it shows Western 
drama rated 46'J higher in homes 
with children. Comedy dramatic and 
Western were the only two types that 
rated consistently higher in homes with 
children than in adult-only homes. 

Comparisons were made on the as- 
sumption that program ratings at- 
tained in a home including only adults 
is the "normal" rating of that program 
with adults, an index to the appeal of 
the program to adults. 

Variations in rating of the same 
program in families with children was 
assumed to be largely the result of the 
influence of children on selection of 
the program. Ratings above and below 
''normal' are taken to measure the 
preferences of children for the pro- 
gram. 

"Human interest" shows like We, 
the People, Candid Camera, and Black 
Robe averaged 15% lower ratings in 
homes with children. I That was in 
spite of the fact that Quiz Kids, a pro- 
gram in the same class, rated 31% 
higher in homes with children.) 

Black Robe rated 38% and What's 
My Line 51% lower in households 
with children. 

In the crime-thriller class Man 
Against Crime rated 39% and Inside 
Detective 11% higher in homes with 
children; but Hands of Murder (now- 
titled Hands of Destiny) rated 42% 
lower and Escape 50% lower than in 
adult homes only. Lights Out did just 
a fraction better in "normal." or base, 
homes. 

The third type of program averaging 
lower than "normal" ratings in the 
7:30-9:30 p.m. period were musical 
programs. Of the seven shows avail- 
able during the period measured, the 
average rating was 21% lower than in 
adult only homes. Firestone Concert 
was 71% below the rating in adults 
only homes. 

Variety shows, on the average, rated 
about as well in both types of home. 
But certain programs in this class 
showed a strong variation from the 
average. 

Toast of the Town rated 15 % high- 
er, Versatile Varieties 18%, and Stage 
Door 30% higher in kid homes than 
in others. 



But Ed Wynn rated 33% and This 
Is Show Business 50^5 lower in homes 
with children. 

Similar variations are found in rat- 
ings of straight dramatic shows. Aver- 
age ratings of eight such programs 
were practically the same. But four 
programs rated lower and four higher 
in homes with children. 

Any sponsor who wants to add adult 
listeners to his audience would do well, 
where possible, to consider what the 
kids like or don't like about his show. 

Thirty-eight per cent of the homes 
in the Ohio sample had children be- 



tween the ages of six and twelve. 
Twelve is the age at which program 
tastes begin to switch toward the adult, 
according to studies by Gilbert Youth 
Research Corp., New York. The evi- 
dence of children's influence in selec- 
tion of adult programs is even more 
striking on Sunday evening than dur- 
ing the week. 

Competing programs in Columbus 
on Sunday evening from 7:30 to 8:00 
were Aldrich Family, Front Row Cen- 
ter, and This Is Show Business. Front 
Roiv Center had practically the same 
rating in homes with children as in 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PiOM&e/l RADIO STATION 



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A card or letter to us, or to Free & Peters, will 
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which includes: 

• Official BMB Coverage Map 

• Latest Market Data— BMB Counties 

• Preliminary 1950 Census Figures 

• Comparative BMB Coverage Graphs 

Handily bound for filing and perforated for 
three-ring binder. 




14 AUGUST 1950 



53 




FIRST in 

the QUAD CITIES 



In Davenport, Rock Island, Moline and East Moline 
is the tichest concentration of diversified industry be- 
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On the Quad Cities' first TV station NBC Network (non- 
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Basic NBC Affiliate 
Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
Ernest Sanders, General Manager 

DAVENPORT, IOWA 

FREE & PETERS, Inc. 

Exclusive National Representatives 




Spot time 
buying made 
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"Suppose I go into a new 
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turn first to STANDARD RATE to size up 
the stations in that market: their affiliations, 
their power, their rates. Then I want to know 
their coverage. I try to determine which would 
give us the most for our money." 
The WIS Service-Ad shown here is an example 
of how many stations are helping buyers of 
time get information they want when they're 
deciding which stations to use. 
Last year the monthly issues of SRDS carried 
the Service-Ads of 278 radio and TV stations, 
supplementing their regular SRDS station list- 
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Note to Broadcasters: THE SPOT RADIO 
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sort of station information that makes it 
easier for buyers of spot time to buy what 
you have to sell. Copies are available from 
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Serving the Media-Buying Function / Publisher 

333 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, Illinois 

NEW YORK • LOS ANGELES 



others. But Aldrich Family was 56% 
higher and Show Business 5(Kr lower 
in homes with children than in adults 
only homes. 

Both Aldrich Family and Show Bus- 
iness had practically the same rating in 
adults only homes. The kids made the 
big difference. 

Again, at 9:00 o'clock. Sunday eve- 
ning. Philco Playhouse and Fred War- 
ing had almost equal ratings in adult 
only homes. But Philco Playhouse rat- 
ed 27% better in homes with children, 
and Fred Waring, 21% lower. 

After 9:30 at night in Columbus, 
the study showed that program ratings 
are almost exactly the same in homes 
with children as in those without chil- 
dren. This would indicate that most 
small fry of Columbus are in bed by 
9:30. 

These indications of the power of 
children to influence selection of pro- 
grams aimed primarily at adults have 
tremendous significance to many spon- 
sors. The specific rating variations to 
be found in Columbus aren't important 
in themselves. The thing is the evi- 
dence that what children like or dis- 
like about a program can mean the 
gain or loss of adult viewers. 

This influence, of course, is limited 
to those hours in which the youngsters 
are available as viewers. 

The Columbus study nails down an 
influence many sponsor, agency, and 
other people have suspected, but had 
no evidence to substantiate. But no- 
body among those in the industry 
checked by sponsor, had imagined the 
influence of kids on selection of adult 
programs to be as great as that indi- 
cated by the Ohio State study. 

Proving that what the small fr\ think 
about a TV program can add or sub- 
tract adult prospects from a sponsor's 
program might still be a more or less 
academic question except for the fact 
that something can be done about it. 

The facts suggest that advertisers 
whose programs fall within a period 
when children are available for viewing 
should subject their shows to careful 
qualitative tests. These would be de- 
signed to reveal those elements in the 
show which attract children and at 



JOE ADAMS 

REACHES ALL 

NEGROES 

IN LOS ANGELES 
IX A lAf I 50C0 WATTS 

IV \J W L CLEAR CHANNEL 
LOS ANGELES • SANTA MONICA. CALIF. 



54 



SPONSOR 



least do not repel adults. These ele- 
ments could be strengthened. 

In many cases, elements which repel 
ihe interest of children might easily be 
sacrificed without losing anything of 
great importance to adult viewers., ac- 
cording to the Schwerin Research 
Corp. which has made qualitative stud- 
ies of Miles Laboratories' Quiz Kids. 

A CBS-Rutgers University study in 
1948 on the social effects of television 
pointed out that "to children, television 
is not something intruding upon al- 
ready established patterns, but is an 
accepted fact in their lives, present vir- 
tually from the beginning. Television 
at this point promises to be a part of 
their total experience far more signifi- 
cant than it can ever be for the great 
majority of adults." 

Not only advertisers now on the air, 
but those considering buying shows 
aimed primarily at adults i but broad- 
cast in a period in which strong kid 
viewing is available) will want to know 
things about the program that may not 



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have seemed important before. For ex- 
ample, the types of shows that kids like 
and dislike most strongly ; the attrac- 
tiveness of specific shows to kid view- 
ers; and elements of the show that ap- 
peal to or repel them. 

Only special qualitative studies can 
reveal the most important answers. But 
such studies can point the way in many 
cases to more adult viewers. * * * 



SHELL OIL ON THE AIR 

{Continued from page 23) 

on a five-a-week basis. 

Starting with KSTP, St. Paul-Minne- 
apolis, they kept adding stations at the 
rate of about 10 a year until they 
reached the current 57 stations that 
now cover more than 90% of Shell di- 
rect distribution areas. Additional out- 
lets will be added in 1951. 

The dealers felt that the Shell news 
programs had an immediate effect on 
business. No controlled tests have yet 
been made. But radio recently was 
added in the Grand Rapids-Kalamazoo 
area, in which there had been no sig- 
nificant sales increases, and Shell will 
keep careful tab on what happens. 

From 1945 through 1949 the com- 
pany's net income looked like this: 

1945 . .$28,712,000 

1946 . . 32,880,000 
1847 . . 59,875,000 

1948 . ._ 111,396,000 

1949 74,423,000 
The decline from the 1948 all-time high 
was due to a decline in product prices, 
Shell officials say. 

While the company feels that no 
member of the radio-newspaper-out- 
door team could be sacrificed without 
seriously weakening the ad-program, 
it is the air-selling which makes possi- 
ble the close identification of dealers 
with the company's advertising efforts 
to deliver new prospects to their drive- 
ways. 

Neither the choice of spot radio nor 
the selection of newscasts was a hap- 
hazard matter. Shell had had experi- 
ence with radio before, and had 
learned some lessons — the hard way. 

They knew that men buy more gas 
and auto supplies than women, so as 
far back as 1932 they sponsored a foot- 
ball commentary with Dartmouth All- 
American Eddie Dooley over an East- 
ern CBS network; later they added a 
mid-Western CBS network with Dooley 
and the famous "Galloping Ghost" of 
the Illini, Red Grange. These were 



TWO TOP 

CBS STATIONS 

TWO BIG 

SOUTHWEST 
MARKETS 

ONE LOW 

COMBINATION 
RATE 



KWFT 

WICHITA FALLS, TEX. 

620 KC 

5,000 WATTS 



KLYN 

AMARILLO, TEX. 

940 KC 

1,000 WATTS 



When you're making out that sched- 
ule for the Southwest don't over- 
look this sales-winning pair of 
CBS stations. For availabilities and 
rates, write, phone or wire our 
representatives. 

National Representative* 

JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



14 AUGUST 1950 



55 



seasonal shots and dealers felt they 
helped build trade. 

But they lacked the continuity to do 
a long-range job and offered the Shell 
advertising officials no chance for a 
sustained campaign to weld dealers in- 
to a component part of the advertising 
effort. 

Then, in the spring of 1935, some- 
body sold the idea of capitalizing on 
Al Jolson's musical comedy fame with 
a Saturday night show called Shell 
Chateau on NBC. This is one that offi- 
cials today don't like to talk about. It 
folded after only a few broadcasts and 



was followed by The Shell Show With 
Joe Cook. This show lasted on NBC 
through June 1937, and marked the 
end of Shell radio until 1944. 

It was then that Shell strategists de- 
cided that news, which had reached its 
peak of popularity and was still rid- 
ing the crest, was the best bet. And 
they wanted the extra flexibility that 
spot would give them in handling com- 
mercials in widely differing geographi- 
cal areas. 

A second reason favoring spot was 
the better opportunity it gave them to 
match their radio coverage with their 



WlNSTON-SALEM'S 




Station 




IN LISTENING (Hooper) 

IN NETWORK (NBC) 

IN POWER (5000 WATTS) 

ON THE DIAL (600) 
ON THE AIR (1930) 



Your FIRST and BEST Buy! 



Affiliated with 
NBC 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (fl) 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY YEAR 



Represented by 
jHeadley-Reed Co. 



own direct territories. (Shell is not 
national on the retail level. In some 
areas it sells to distributors who mar- 
ket the products under their own 
brands.) 

Most important, local programs gave 
them the indispensable chance both to 
localize the show and to bring Shell 
dealers into the picture. This had been 
the missing element in their previous 
radio. Through the cooperation of 
each individual station the show could 
be merchandised to the hilt to even 
dealer in the territory. 

When the new plans for radio were 
made known, dealers everywhere 
promptly besieged their divisional 
headquarters with requests that their 
territories be covered. Where the mar- 
ket division head I there are 16 in the 
field I felt that distribution warranted 
it, he made the recommendation for 
radio to the Shell advertising depart- 
ment headed by Marschner and his 
media-chief Shugert, in New York. 
They analyze the situation and in con- 
sultation with the agency. J. Walter 
Thompson, make a final decision. This 
has been the process preceding every 
program buy since Shell started its 
news formula. 



WSRS 

CLEVELAND 

.... "The Family Station" 
serving Clevelanders and 
all the local nationalities 
in the 3rd most densely 
populated metropolitan 
district in the U. S. A. ... 
covering 336 square miles. 

.... Ask Forjoe for the 
power-packed selling facts 
about the effective WSRS 
domination and local 
impact. Hooper rating up 
...WSRS cost per thousand 
lowest in town, thus the 
best buy in . . . 

CLEVELAND 

WSRS 



56 



SPONSOR 



Decisions on what markets to cover 
are made on the basis of distribution 
and business potential in relation to 
the budget for radio. 

Radio gets about \'^ of the total ad- 
vertising budget, with the remainder 
divided between newspapers, outdoor 
posters, and point-of-sale material. The 
company will spend between a million 
and a million-and-a-half dollars for 
radio this year on 57 stations, includ- 
ing six of the Arrowhead network. 

From the start. Shell never left its 
radio investment to chance. Shugert 
felt that it was the medium to boost 
dealer morale and enthusiasm for con- 
verting first-time drivers-in into cus- 
tomers. 

As radio moved into the basic ad- 
vertising plan. Shell replaced a man 
with part-time radio responsibility 
with another whose fulltime job, under 
media director Shugert, was radio. 

This was E. W. Lier. switched from 
the Shell touring service. He'd been 
with the company about 11 years and 
knew its problems intimately. 

Today, in the Shell scheme of things, 
radio stations are added in a well-de- 
fined program. Here's the pattern. 



y in Syracuse, N. Y. 

WFBL 




r 



now delivers 
more listeners, 
DAYTIME or 
EVENING, 
than anytime 
history! 



■ I I VII i vt ■■ j 

I in it's hi 



Call FREE & PETERS 
for Availabilities 

WFBL 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 

14 AUGUST 1950 




BASIC 

SINCE 

1927 



Lier. together with John Heiney of 
J. Walter Thompson, Shell agency, 
travel into the field to get things start- 
ed properly. Heiney, himself an ex- 
station man and program producer, 
writes the commercials and insures 
hand-in-glove coordination with the 
agency. 

"Merchandising suggestions can look 
pretty cold and peremptory if you just 
get them in a letter," Lier explained. 
"But its different when the guy who's 
asking for the help shows up in per- 
son to explain why be thinks it's a good 
idea." Numerous devices are used to 



give the program a local feeling and 
to make the Shell franchise holders 
feel the) own a direct slake in it. even 
though the company foots 100 r v of 
the bill. 

One of the most successful is to re- 
cord two-minute interview's with deal- 
ers; these are broadcast as part of the 
regular show. Heiney writes the script, 
doing a half-dozen on the spot to give 
station personnel an exact idea of what 
he wants in future interviews. 

The dealer is allowed to talk about 
any phase of his business he chooses. 
But Heiney always insists on working 




What About the Golden Jubilee? 

As WSM begins its second quarter-century of 
broadcasting, and as WSM-TV makes its debut, 
we want to emphasize and re-emphasize these 
basic facts. 



In the years to come, you can count on 
WSM to continue its policy of live pro- 
gramming to the tastes and needs of the 
Central South Audience of millions. 

You can count on WSM for talent of such 
quality and quantity that its position as 
number one sales maker to the Central 
South will become even more firmly en- 
trenched in the years 1o come. 




57 



1ft 



/ 



WTAL 




5000 Watts — Day and Night 



(lie center of 



Capitaland 

Selling 

12 

Georgia Counties 

and 

11 

Florida Counties 

'Ask your John Blair 
man to tell you the full 
story on Capitaland and 
North Florida's most 
powerful radio voice — 
WTAL! 

Southeastern Rep. 

Harry E. Cummings 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

WTAL 

TALLAHASSEE 

John H. Phipps, Owner 
L. Herschel Graves, Gen'l Mgr. 

FLORIDA GROUP 

Columbia 
Broadcasting 

System 



in plenty of personal references, some- 
thing about home and family. Heiney 
does these interviews with the dealer, 
but future ones are done by the news- 
raster from scripts written by Heiney 
in New York, based on data forward- 
ed from the field. Dealers are chosen 
for this honor on the basis of their all- 
around job for Shell products. In 
some cases, a division manager may 
use the air interview as bait to en- 
courage a lagging dealer to get back 
on the ball. 

The man to be interviewed alwavs 
sends out postal cards ahead of time 
notifying his customers of the broad- 
cast and asking them to be sure to lis- 
ten in and let him know how he liked 
it. Besides being a good public rela- 
tions gesture, it is another check on 
the program's impact. 

Service station men love it when, 
following their broadcast, customers 
praise their air-manner or kid them 
good-naturedly. It's hard for a man 
to forget his company is backing him 
up when he gets responses like that. 

The radio station doesn't allow the 
Shell service operators to forget that 
Shell news is their own baby. The 
company expects each station to come 
through with aid in keeping the opera- 
tors sold on this idea. 

Following notification from the dis- 
trict manager to the dealers about the 
program, the radio station writes each 
dealer a letter over the signature of 
the newscaster. The newscaster is in 
most cases a well-known personality 
in the area, rather than a staff an- 
nouncer. This gives added punch to 
the letter. 

Most stations, when first starting 
Shell news, present to each Shell dealer 
a poster which features the station call 
letters and the Shell news. It fits the 
swivel which is part of each stations 
equipment. 

The radio station also supplies a 
number of cellophane tape window 
stickers which are placed in four or 
five spots around the service station 
calling attention to the program. 

A station promotion which always 
makes a big hit with the Shell sales- 
man and his wife is the gift of a pair 
of theater or sports events tickets with 
a letter written in longhand by the 
newscaster. Several dealers each month 
are chosen for this continuing promo- 
tion. 

Each newscaster is expected to make 
an informal visit to three or four deal- 
ers every week. He chats about busi- 




Important 

in yfflo* 
selling 

WDEL-TV 

CHANNEL 7 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 



Assures advertisers the clearest 
picture in this rich, important 
market. NBC network shows, fine 
local programming — provide an 
established and growing audi- 



ence. Many advertisers 
are now enjoying profit- 
able returns. 



NJ.V* 




WGAL-TV 

CHANNEL 4 

LANCASTER, PENNA. 




The only television sta- 
tion that reaches this 
large, important Penn- 
sylvania market. Local program- 
ming — top shows from four net- 
works: NBC, CBS, ABC and 
DuMont guarantee advertisers 
a loyal, responsive audience. 

STEINMAN STATIONS 

Clair R. McCollough, 

General Manager 
Represented by 

ROBERT MEEKER 

ASSOCIATES 

New York Chicago 

San Francisco Los Angeles 




58 



SPONSOR 



Ask your national representative 



You're on the verge of a decision, and a problem. 

What business papers to pick for your station promotion? 

It's no problem to kiss off, for your choice can have 
a telling effect on your national spot income. 

But where to get the facts? 

The answer is simple. Ask your national representative. 

He knows. His salesmen get around. They learn which business 
papers are appreciated, read and discussed by buyers of broadcast time. 

His is an expert opinion. 

Don't overlook your national representative. 



SPONSOR 

The shortest distance between buyer and seller 



Miss Alice Carle 




John F. Murray Adv 


ertising Agency 


22 East 40th Street 




\ew York City 




Dear Alice: 




Business is really 


aboomin' here at 




WCHS in 




Charleston, West 


P[t~*_L~ 


Virginny! The 


h&sJz 


ole 5000 watts 




on 580 station is 




doin' s e c h a 




bang-up job uv 




sellin thin's fer 




hits (lien Is. thet 


M ■T v j~& 


b izn e s s jest 


k e ep s poppin' 




righ t along! 


Piftk ^ f-T ^BP 


Why Alice. June 




uv this vear wuz 




th' bisgest June 




II ( IIS ever had, 




and t h e r e' v e 


1 M 


been some 


mighty big ones 


»K\\ 


in th' years gone 


bv! Jest goes 


My^Jill 


ler s h o w yuh 




thet w hen yuh 




does a job jer 


^m$r 


peepul they 
keeps comin 




back i e r more 




an more! Jest 


tho't I'd let yuh know ivhut peepul 


thinks uv WCHS! 


Yrs. 




Algy 


w c 


H S 


Charleston 


, W. Va. 









*jdiS 


issz 




//[I fcfg^j ' ti: \W 




HS£H ' \'^Jl 






^BSH = — r^l" 




Gil 







Night or day KGVO's 
5000 watts will keep you 
"in touch" while you are 
in this Dude Ranch Coun- 
try. 

76e /4nt 7Ho4&c< Station 




\J 



5000 watts ANACONDA 

Night & Day BUTTE 

MISSOULA 250 watts 

Night & Day 



MONTANA 

NOT ONE, BIT SEVEN MAJOR INDUSTRIES 



ness and the program. 

The talent is also expected to attend 
public functions to which radio per- 
sonalities are invited. This is another 
public relations gesture for the pro- 
gram, which also helps promote it in 
the eyes of dealers. 

Shell requires some kind of mer- 
chandising mailing to go out regularly 
to dealers at least every two months, 
even if only a post card or letter. 

Last year Lier and Heiney spent 
about a week of each month visiting 
stations to confer and check on pro- 
motion to dealers. This year, with 
more than 90% of the territories al- 
ready covered by radio, Lier and 
Heiney neither go out so often nor 
stay so long. 

Most station managers carrying 
Shell news visit New York from time 
to time; and when Shugert is in the 
field, as he frequently is, he always 
calls on Shell stations. 

There are two main yardsticks for 
selecting Shell stations. The first is co- 
incidence of its coverage with the 
Shell distribution area. The second is 
the rating of available news shows. 
Shell tries to buy the top show in each 
case. 

One factor which has undoubtedly 
worked in favor of Shell newscasts 
(which, incidentally, never include 
comment by the newscaster) is that 
they never use the full amount of com- 
mercial time normally allowed them 
under the NAB Code. 

Shell believes that there is just so 
much to be said, without irritating 
repetition, on a theme such as the cur- 
rent "Activated" theme. Shell wisely 
refrains from overplaying it. 

In late evening hours as much as 
three minutes is permitted bv the 
NAB Code, but Heiney "s pitch lasts 
from one to one and three-quarter 
minutes. For earlier news spots, he 
will write the commercial proportion- 
ately shorter. 

About half the shows fall in the six 
to seven p.m. period, while about two- 
thirds of the remainder come around 
ten. There are a few 11:00 p.m. and 
early morning periods. Most shows 
are heard five times a week. 

While concentrating on perfecting 
their news coverage, the Shell ad-men 
have been watching TV's efforts to 
break out of the static rut in which 
most visual news programing falls. As 
an experiment, they will sponsor five 
minutes of news on WNBT, New York, 
starting 28 August. The show will be 



tt 



WSYR-TV 

has come in good" 

Chateau fay ,£ 

^ WSYR-TV 

160 MILES AWAY! 

News item from page 1 of the Chateau- 
gay Record of May 26, 1950: "Televi- 
sion reception in Chateaugay that most 
thought would not be an accomplished 
fact for many years became a reality 
this week. Ray Lucia . . . now is enjoy- 
ing televised programs nightlv at his 
Lake Street home . . . WSYR-TV has 
come in good. Ray reports that when 
he was down in Syracuse last week the 
experts down there just couldn't be- 
lieve television would carry this far." 
Chateaugay is 160 air miles from 
Syracuse. Yes, WSYR-TV really cov- 
ers the great Central New York Market 
—and points north, south, east and west. 



TV 



channel 



NBC Affiliate in Central New York 
HEADLEY-REED, National Representatives 



RhymalineTime, featuring emcee 
David Andrews, pianist Harry 
Jepks and KMBC-KFRMs cele- 
brated Tune Chasers, is one of 
the Heart of America's favorite 




morning broadcasts. Heard each 
weekday morning from 7:30 to 
8:15, Rhymaline Time is a musi- 
cal-comedy program that pulls 
more mail than any other current 
"Team" feature. 

Satisfied sponsors have includ- 
ed, among others, Katz Drug 
Company, Land -Sharp Motors, 
Jones Store, and Continental 
Pharmaceutical Corp. 

Contact us, or any Free & Peters 
"Colonel" for availabilities! 



KMBC 

of Kansas City 

KFRM 

for Rural Kansas 



60 



SPONSOR 



on five nights a week from 6:25-6:30, 
with Don Goddard as newscaster. 

Meanwhile, reports show listening 
to radio news I including Shell news) 
steadily rising since the war in Korea. 
Shell dealers know that they have a 
personal stake in the business of keep- 
ing their customers posted on local, 
national, and world events. 

Messrs. Marschner, Shugert, Lier, 
and Heinev are seeing that they don't 
forget it. * * * 



RADIO IS GETTING BIGGER 

I Continued from page 34) 

1950, the percentage rose to 98.9%. 

2. In 1945, 29.4% of all radio 
homes had two sets; in 1950, 35.6%. 

3. In 1945. 9.1% of all homes had 
three or more receivers; in 1950, 
13.2' y . The 1950 survey showed one 
in every two homes with more than 
one set. 

4. Of 9.100 respondents, 80% of 
the men and 72.7% of the women said 
they listened to sports or sports news. 

Radio comparison with newspa- 
pars in Colorado and Wyoming. 

A KOA survey released 8 August 1950 
shows the results of radio listening in 
Colorado and Wyoming. The Colo- 
rado-Wyoming Diary findings repre- 
sent the first time that a survey of 
program audiences has been made in 
the two states. It was conducted April 
1950 by Research Services, Inc., Den- 
ver. 

Although this survey was made pri- 
marily to analyze two-state listening, 
the average time spent listening to ra- 
dio programs as compared to reading 
newspapers and magazines also was un- 
covered. According to the research 
firm, the average person in Colorado 
and Wyoming spends two hours and 
15 minutes daily at the radio. News- 
papers get 39 minutes of his time; 
magazines. 18 minutes. The combined 
population of the two states is about 
1,500.000. It was found that during 
the average morning quarter-hour 
189,000 persons listen to the radio; 
in the afternoon, 177,000; in the eve- 
ning, 307,500. 

Individual stations report higher lis- 
tenership. For example, WAGA in At- 
lanta reports a 43% increase in 1949- 
50 over 1945-46. KTUL, Tulsa, shows 
cost per 1,000 of $10.63 in 1943-44 as 
contrasted with $8.59 in 1949-50. Nu- 
merous network and independent sta- 
tions report similar findings. * * * 



To a Big City Ad Man 

unaccustomed to 5 o'clock shadows 



5 o'clock in the morning is either au fulls ear!) 0) mighty late. 
Jf you've approached ii only from the tired • ■ i t > side you have 
probably missed its more invigorating aspects. 

lowans fare better. Instead of barren asphalt jungles they see 
fruitful fields with de* glistening in the sunrise. In place of 
night-deserted buildings thej see the shadows oi fattening beeves 
whose composite market weight in 194-9 was 2 billion 386 million 
pounds. Iowa grows mow cattle and makes more money at it — 
than tun of the legendary range states. 

The} see the shadows of a fantastic '"pork barrel" worth over 
$737 million in 1949. Iowa marketed one-fourth of all the pork 
in the country last year. They see the shadow of a gigantic egg 
which provides pin money for Iowa farm wives of $200 million 
annually. The egg and Iowa nestle cosily at the top of the 
nation's marl. el basket. 

The substance of all these shadows is $2 billion 1 1 ' j million for 
Iowa cash farm income in 1949 — first for the nation according to 
Sales Management. Industrial Iowa adds another $2 billion to 
total individual income. It's a market worth reaching — 
and in Eastern Iowa WMT reaches. 

Please ask the Katz man for additional data. 



5000 WATTS, 600 KC 




DAY AND NIGHT 



BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 



TOPEKA 




A Metropolitan 

Market -.-.„. 
NOW 



WREN 




FIRST ALL DAY 

ABC 

5000 WATTS 



WEED & CO. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



14 AUGUST 1950 



61 



BMI 






SIMPLE ARITHMETIC 

IN 

MUSIC LICENSING 

BMI LICENSEES 

Networks 23 

AM 2,128 

FM 380 

TV 96 

Short-Wave 4 

Canada 150 

TOTAL BMI 

LICENSEES . . 2,781* 

You are assured of 
complete coverage 
when you program 
BMI-licensed music 

*As of August 7, 1950 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



GROWING 

GROWING 

GROWN 

I MORNING PERIOD* 

PLUS... 
a 14.8 Over-all Audience 
Increase Since 1949 
ANOTHER BONOS 
FOR ADVERTISERS... 
Special merchandising 
department for extra 
promotion of sales. 
•January, February, 1950 Hooper 
IAI Ann AM 5.000 Watts 
linDD FM 50,000 Watts 
AMERICAN BROADCASTING 
COMPANY 
OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
THE MOBILE PRESS REGISTER 
NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY 
THE BRANHAM COMPANY 




510, jMadisan 



(Continued from page 6) 

All in all. it looks to me as though 
your Fall Facts edition has immeas- 
urably hurt WSAZ-TV insofar as it 
was eliminated as under construction 
with a network link, and to the same 
degree I would be inclined to believe 
that your magazine suffered bv reason 
of inaccurate reporting. 

Marshall Rosene 

General Manager 

WSAZ 

Huntington, W. Va. 



In your issue of 17 July, you show 
on page 103 the addresses of Film 
Equities, Nationwide Television and 
Standard Television Corporations at 
1600 Broadway. This is incorrect. All 
three companies are located in the Par- 
amount Building at 1501 Broadway. 
Robert H. Wormhoudt 
Film Equities Corporation 
New York 



In your television map for sponsors 
as of your issue of 17 July, you listed 
WLW-D, Dayton, Ohio, as having 59,- 
000 sets in market. 

This figure is incorrect. As of 1 
July, there were 100.000 sets in the 
WLW-D 45-mile area. This figure 
comes from WLW-TVs very accurate 
research department in Cincinnati. Don 
Miller is in charge of it. He handles 
research for the Crosley television 
chain. 

Frank Hall Fraysur 
Promotion-Publicity Manager 
WLW-D 
Dayton 



My congratulations to sponsor for 
the excellent information it contained 
in the Fall Facts issue. I am sure all 
of your readers must have found it 
informative and helpful as I did. 
William B. Ogden 
Manager, Radio-Television 
LeVally Incorporated 
Chicago 



On page 103 of the 17 July issue list- 
ing was made of various companies 
who specialize in films for TV. As we 
are in that category I and are sold in 
over 30 maiketsl. it was no doubt an 



oversight that we were not included. 
Atlas has 11 Western features and 
over 350 top comedy shorts available 
for TV at the present time. 

Henry Brown 

President 

Atlas Television Corp. 

Neiv York 



Congratulations on putting so many 
vital sales facts into your Fall Facts 
issue. 

Lee Hart 
Assistant Director 
BAB 
New York 



GOODMAN'S TELEPHONE CAME 

We have been asked why our Radio 
Telephone Game was not included in 
your recent article. 

Your editor, Mr. Norman Glenn, did 
request information on our program, 
and we advised SPONSOR that we would 
be happy to give the information if the 



WAVE 
WON'T 
SETTLE IN 
REDWINE 

(Ky.) 1 - 

A or room tem- 
Chilled, *»"»"*' SeofRedwine 
perature,the people 

fcy> cant ^hy,-e'd be plumb 
things. ... ^ ^ arri ved. • • • 
mU8 ty before w 

Instead, we co»ce»tra£_? ^ 
Lo«^iUeTrad 1 ngA^ ea 

ulcus territory tJ ncepeop le 
W ith money, for r 

£" e iD r 8 n Se'ghbors in the 
S^wa&^n portion, of 

ou r State. ^ 

^ound Lonisville! 




62 



SPONSOR 



article specified that the Goodman 
Telephone Game was the only one of 
the telephone gimmick programs that 
did not include the element of chance. 

Presumably SPONSOR was fearful 
that they would be "stepping on some- 
body's toes"; thus we were excluded. 

Our Radio Telephone Game has 
been broadcast by 160 AM stations 
during the last 14 years, and because 
it does not contain the element of 
chance could never be construed as a 
lottery. 

While our program closely resem- 
bles Bingo, we developed a scientific 
method whereby everyone playing the 
game has an equal opportunity to win. 
It took 14 months to work out the 
mechanical perfection of this method. 

Listeners play with the five figures 
of the telephone number or the last 
five figures of their social security 
number. Each and ever) telephone 
and social security number is exposed 
at least once, and in any case an equal 
number of times, every 13 weeks, 
thereby giving every player an equal 



SELLSOIVP 







FEATURE PROGRAMS, Inc. 
1 1 3 W. 57th ST., NEW YORK 19. N. Y. 

Mcluvrk Calibre Programs al Cecal Station Cost 



opportunity to win. 

Every winner, not just the first one 
who gets in, receives a duplicate prize. 

Our telephone operators who receive 
the calls remain at their posts several 
hour after each program, or until the 
phones stop ringing. Listeners ma\. if 
they prefer, mail their entries. We 
have written permission from the Post 
Office Department to use the mails. 

Listeners need not go to a store to 
pick up a chart with which to play. 
They can make their own. 

Since the court injunction was 
granted stopping any action on the 
part of the FCC in conjunction with 
lotteries or games of chance, many 
telephone games clearly violating lot- 
tery laws have been accepted by stations. 

A lottery consists of three elements: 
prize, consideration, and chance. Elim- 
inate chance and you can't have a lot- 
tery. The big question at the present 
time is "what constitutes considera- 
tion." Some lawyers contend that 
merely listening to the program is con- 
sideration. Some of the telephone 
games go so far as to make it neces- 
sary for participants to pick up a chart 
or a form at the sponsor's place of 
business. 

According to page six of the 17 De- 
cember, 1949, issue of Billboard Maga- 
zine, one of the programs mentioned 
in your article of 3 July was ruled a 
lottery by Attorney General James H. 
Anderson of Nebraska. A musical 
bingo game called Musico was restrict- 
ed some 10 or 11 years ago. A bro- 
chure recently distributed by one of 
the companies mentioned in your arti- 
cle states in their circular "Play Radio 
can be used by broadcasters without 
contravening the Commission's rules, 
at least until such time as the Supreme 
Court finally decides the pending 
cases." If a broadcasting station were 
not worried about the Commission, 
there are still state laws and postal 
codes io be observed. Later on. if the 
injunction is removed, there is always 
the possibility that the FCC will frown 
on such programing. 

Anyone can put Bingo on the air if 
they disregard the lottery laws. I con- 
tend that the day of reckoning will 
come, and as far as I'm concerned. I'd 
play safe — safe for the station, safe 
for the sponsor, and safe for myself. 
I want to stay in business. 

Harry S. Goodman 

Harry S. Goodman Productions 

New York 




"Know-How" 
Available 



Experienced radioman, 
heavy on sales and promo- 
tion, seeks permanent loca- 
tion with pleasant firm. 
Aggressive, wife and two 
children, sober, worker not 
dreamer. Desires station or 
sales organization offer, will 
travel. Appreciate oppor- 
tunity to discuss possibili- 
ties. Box No. 43 A. 



14 AUGUST 1950 



63 




If they dared 

Many a sponsor would like to know 
the secret of getting the most out of 
his agency. 

Many an agency man would relish 
the opportunity to tell his client a 
thing or two. 

In this issue and the one to follow 
sponsor gives both of them their 
chance. Under the provocative title, 
"What agencv men would tell clients 
... if they dared,' 1 sponsor bares 
the souls of a number of agency men 
who talked freely when they were 
convinced that they wouldn't be quoted 
by name. 

The results are interesting, to say r 
the least. 



Next issue we turn the tables with 
an article giving the sponsor's side of 
the picture. If you'd like to contribute 
a nugget or two, don't hesitate. And 
we promise not to mention vour name. 

Standard TV rate card 

Agencies and advertisers will stand 
up and cheer the recommendations re- 
cently made by the Television Stand- 
ardization Group, in collaboration 
with the Radio and Television Broad- 
casting Committee of the AAAA, to 
help TV stations establish rate cards 
of greatest use to both buvers and 
sellers. 

After numerous sessions, this all-in- 
dustry committee, working under au- 
thority of the Broadcast Advertising 
Committee of the NAB, has come up 
with five model rate cards, each iden- 
tical except for different model rate 
tables designed to incorporate varia- 
tions in pricing practices within the 
industry. These are contained in an 
attractive spiral-bound booklet. 

Besides the rate table, and facilities 
charges I film, studio, remotes I , the 
recommendations include 20 specific 
points of general information: chan- 
nel, power, time; production services; 
studio equipment and personnel: film 
projection equipment and personnel: 
film production equipment and per- 
sonnel; remote pickup equipment and 



personnel: music performing rights: 
film library services: music library 
services; news services; length of com- 
mercial copy; foreign language broad- 
casts; product acceptability: program 
and copy acceptability; political 
broadcasts; station option time; com- 
missions and payment schedules; rate 
protection; contract limits; discounts. 

It is suggested that the standard 
rate card be 6" x 3%" folded, making 
it a convenient pocket piece. Spread 
out, it is easy to use. All vital data are 
on a single side. 

Eugene S. Thomas, now director »f 
operations of WOR-TV, was chairman 
of the 17-man Standardization Group. 
His executive committee included John 
E. Surrick, WFIL-TV (now with 
WFBR); James V. McConnell, NBC: 
William H. Weldon, Blair TV; E. Y. 
Flanigan. WSPD-TV. Others on the 
committee were Edward Codel, Katz 
Agency; Russel Woodward, Free & 
Peters; E. K. Jett, WMAR-TV; Arthur 
Gerbel, Jr., KJR; George W. Harvey. 
WGN-TV; Henry W. Slavick, WMCT: 
James T. Milne, WNHC-TV; Louis 
Read. WDSU-TV; Henry I. Christal. 
Edward Petry & Co.; George Mosko- 
vics, CBS; Harold L. Morgan, Jr.; 
ABC; William B. Ryan, KFI-TV (now 
general manager of NAB). Charles 
A. Batson, NAB TV Director, served 
as committee secretarv. 



Applause 



Cuide to Iowa listening 

I ntil somebody presents a better 
case, our candidate for the station (or 
network) that knows its audience best 
is 50,000 watt WHO in Des Moines. 

What started out 13 years ago to 
be a survey of WHO popularity has 
branched out into a full-fledged annual 
research project embracing 9,000 Iowa 
families from all sections and segments 
of the state. The 13th Consecutive 
Annual Study of Radio Listening 
Habits in the State of Iowa (Marcli- 
April, 1050) is by all odds the most 
ambitious of the series. Previous 
studies gave answers to such questions 
as radio ownership, station prefer- 
ences, types of programs best liked 
economic facts about families. The 
newest analysis goes further. For ex- 
ample, an advertiser can now learn 
the comparative prestige standings in 



Iowa of radio, newspapers, local gov- 
ernment, schools, and churches; atti- 
tude of adult Iowans toward beer ad- 
vertising; ways in which radio can do 
a better job; ownership of electric 
dish washers, (lollies driers; TV sets 
and portable battery-operated radios. 

A two-day diary study, embracing 
every set in every seventh home of the 
9,215 interviewed, reveals meaning of 
'"heard regularly" and '"listened to 
most" ratings. It compares "recalled" 
listening with actual listening. 

For several years this annual check 
of Iowa listening has thrown light on 
use of multiple sets within the homes; 
on radios located in barns: on radio 
receivers in automobiles. 

A glimpse of the findings contained 
in the first 77 pages of the 1950 sur- 
vey 'the full report will be ready 
later I reveals such tidbits as these: 



one out of every two Iowa homes has 
more than one radio set; 14.2% of 
all farmers had radios in their barns 
(in 1949 it was 11.8$ l ; 98.5% of all 
radio homes were electrified. Com- 
paring radio and newspapers. 8% said 
newspapers were doing the best job. 
19% said radio; 73% gave equal 
rank to both. News broadcast led in 
the "best liked type of program" cate- 
gory with both men and women, fea- 
tured comedians were second, popular 
music was third with women, sports 
with men. 

What's happening to radio through- 
out the U. S. is reflected in this one- 
state study. SPONSOR commends Dr. 
Forrest Whan of Wichita Universitj . 
who also does the annual WIBW, To- 
peka study, for his scientific and pains- 
taking approach: the WHO owner- 
ship and management for sponsoring 
the survey. 



64 



SPONSOR 



the 

pied piper 



now 
rides 




PHILADELPHIA moppets follow "The Ghost Rider" in 
legions, over WCAU-TV every day. "The Ghost Rider" 
has no off season — right on into summer there are more 
requests for memhership than ever hefore. 

"The Ghost Rider" westerns have more juvenile 
viewers than any western feature in Philadelphia. 

As further evidence of "The Ghost Rider's" popu- 
larity (if more is needed) he was "mohbed" by 30.000 
howling, adoring youngsters at his first personal appear- 
ance at Fairmount Park in Philadelphia on July 4. 



And for more documented facts. "The Ghost Rider" 
has tens of thousands of returned performance cards and 
letters from enthusiastic parents which bear witness to 
the fact that they watch his program — and that his good 
conduct code is followed to the letter. 

This loyalty speaks for itself. And if you know any- 
thing about children, you know how demanding they can 
be for the product their hero endorses. 

If you want a following for your product in Phila- 
delphia, follow "The Ghost Rider." 



WCAUTV 



Repmcn (<•</ by Ktulio $alr.i 



CBS affiliate— Channel 10 



R £ v 1 1 » t u 
AUG H1S50 

GENERAL LIB : 



WWDCNOW 




. 



i 



in total share of Washington audience 



Station A (Network) 25.1% 



Station B (Network) 15.0% 



WW DC 12.8% 



Station C (Network) 10.5% 



Station D — 5.9% 



Station E (Network) 5.8% 



Station F — 3.7% 



Station G — 3.3% 



Station H — 3.3% 



Big . . . big . . . BIG! That's the new audience 
WWDC delivers advertisers with its 5000 watts 
and its low rates. Only two big network stations 
have a larger share of audience. WWDC has 
more than the two other network outlets . . . 
more than all other independents. That's why 
WWDC is Washington's dominant independent. 
That's why WWDC is your best buy in Wash- 
ington. Get the facts from your Forjoe man. 






250,000 NEW i LISTENERS 




W 



WASHINGTON, 




■ 



Miscellaneous — 5.3% 
* Pulse, May- June, 1950. Share of Audience, 6:00 A.M. to midnight, Monday through Sunday. 



28 AUGUST 1950 • $8.00 a Year 



RECEIVED v 
AUG 3 1 1950 

What sponsors 

, J!2C GENERAL LIBRARY ng% 

say about agencies — p. 26 

Farm programing builds feed company — see p. 24 



SP 10-4* I 22 20 

TRANCES SPRAGUE 
NATIONAL BROADCAST IN 
5 ROCKEFELLER PLA2A 
NEW YORK 2 N Y 






Spoil I 







Mr. Sponsc 

Robert 
Brenner 

page 



P.S. 



page 17 



Hfe 




Station 
Merchan- 
dising 

page 21 

Doughboy's 

Radio 

Success 

page 24 



A 




Drug Stores 
On the Air 



page 



Sponsor 
index 



page 33 



r. Sponsor 
Asks 



Roundup 

page 44 



Sponsor 
Speaks 








> T < 




of serving and selling Kentuckiana 




When I first went on the air in 1922 
Kentuckiana was a good market. 
. . . now it's better . . . 
. . . and it's still growing! 




For example: 

Kentuckiana (Ky. plus a generous 
portion of Sou. Ind.) leads the nation 
in both increased crop and livestock 
production gains and is well above 
the national average in increased 
value of manufactured goods. 




And income! ! ! 

Why it was over t-h-r-e-e times the 
national gain in effective buying 
power (1948-49). 





In just two years . . . 

the radio homes in Kentuckiana in- 
creased 19.1%. 
They listen before they buy! 



... to be exact . . . they listen to ME 
before they buy. I say it blushingly, 
but, according to Mr. Hooper I'm the 
listeners' favorite! (I have more top- 
rated Hooper periods than the next 
two stations combined.) 




. . . and I have a corner on all those 
great CBS stars like 

Arthur! . . . Jack! . . . Bing! 



V 








Likewise . . . 

I'm quite a programmer myself. 
To wit: Coffee Call (my own show) 
attracted more than 20,000 visitors in 
the last 1 1 months. 




My newsroom is the best in broad- 
casting(according to the National As- 
sociation of Radio News Directors) 

And the farmers will tell you that I 
have the only complete Farm Pro- 
gramming Service in Kentuckiana 



By the way. . . 

WHAS-TV is quite a comer too! The 
best visual salesman in the market! 
A part of the great WHAS tradition! 




50,000 WATTS 



1A CLEAR CHANNEL 



840 KILOCYCLES 



The only radio station serving and sellin g 
all of the rich Kentuckiana Market 



Television in the WHAS tradition 



.£»" 




INCORPORATED • ESTABLISHED 1422 



WHAS TV 

^ <HmMiHtte,/wtfkcly * 



wtM2,tferifad(£ 



VICTOR A SHOLIS, D. rector 



NEIL D. CLINE, Soles Director 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY AND CO 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE COURIER JOURNAL & LOUISVILLE TIMES 



SPONSOR 



5IO MADISON AV E N U E, NEW YORK 



2 8 &* Z^J 



MILLION DOLLAR BAB PROMISES ADVERTISERS FACTS Decision of NAB Board to separate 
Broadcast Advertising Bureau and push for $1,000,000 or more annual budget is 
good news for advertisers and agencies who want radio facts and figures compar- 
able to data Bureau of Advertising turns out for newspapers. One of every four 
Bureau of Advertising employees (total about 100) does research. Separate BAB 
won't be in super class at start, but is expected to gain momentum after member- 
ship builds in 1951. Separation date is 1 April 1951. . . . PICTURE MOGULS 
WARM TO TV ADVERTISING Tests by theater owners and film producers in New 
Haven, Philadelphia, New York, and Los Angeles to determine what television ad- 
vertising can do to hypo box office are proving positive. Biggest test was made 
by Columbia Pictures for film "711 Ocean Drive" over all available outlets in LA 
and New York. Receipts in both cities were among best this year. . . . RADIO/TV 
LOOMS STRONG IN FLORIDA CITRUS PLANS Once substantial air advertiser, but in 
recent years addicted to national magazines, Florida Citrus Commission 1950-51 
choice veering toward specific market media. Under J. Walter Thompson, which 
wrested $1,250,000 in consumer advertising from Benton & Bowles, emphasis will be 
on spot radio, spot TV, newspapers. . . . 75% of TV STATIONS NETWORK LINKED 
THIS FALL Microwave circuits, private and AT&T, are making it possible to bring 
networks to most TV cities now. By World Series time some 80 stations (out of 
107 total) in 47 cities will be interconnected. . . . RADIO NETS 5 AND 6? Two 
western firms with one idea (to provide co-op programing to stations for local 
sale) plan to debut as national networks this fall. Liberty Broadcasting Sys- 
tem, Dallas, is using its successful record as recreator of big league baseball 
as leverage for attracting affiliates. It expects 400 in 48 states by 1 October, 
when it intends to go on 16 hour daily schedule with sportscasts, news programs, 
quiz programs, women's programs. Progressive Broadcasting System, Hollywood, 
hopes to begin 1 November with some 300 affiliates and 10 hour daily schedule. 
Many of its programs will be transcribed, but fed via telephone wires. Soap 
operas, quizzes, western shows, recreated sports also feature Progressive lineup. 
. . . TV DAY GETS BIGGER Demand by sponsors for TV time is stretching many sta- 
tion schedules this fall. During weekends (from 6 a.m. Friday to 1 a.m. Monday) 
station isn't off air. WLW-T, also Cincinnati, has extended its schedule to 15% 
hours weekdays (8:30 a.m. to midnight). Other Crosley stations in Dayton and 
Columbus use same hours. . . . RADIO TV AD BUDGETS SAFE FOR PRESENT With few ex- 
ceptions, like cancellation of ambitious Norge TV campaign, fall-planned air cam- 
paigns seem set to go despite war threats. Admen are going back to wartime records 
for scarce commodity advertising themes. Though uncertainty exists, 1950 and early 



SPONSOR. Volume 1. No. 18. 28 August 19.10. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc.. at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore 11. Md, Executive, Editorial. Circulation Office 
ulO .Madison Ave.. New York 22. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1919 at Baltimore, Md. postofflce under Act 3 March I 



SPONSOR REPORTS 28 August 1950 . . . 

and early 1951 consumer goods sales loom bright as they could be. . . . 7950 KANSAS 
RADIO AUDIENCE STUDY SHOWS DECADE DIFFERENCES What's happened between 1940 
and 1950 in Kansas radio is shown in advance release by WIBW, Topeka, of 1950 per- 
sonal interview study. Highlights include: 1940 homes with one or more radios, 
84.8%; 1950, 97.4% ... in 1940, 13.2% of homes had two or more radios ; in 1950, 
37.3% ... in 1940, 20.8% of all car-owners had auto radios ; in 1950, 57.7%. . . . 
AIRLINES EXCITED ABOUT TV Looks like big airlines, who rarely have used radio 
advantageously or often, are jockeying for position in visual medium. As this issue 
goes to press we know of one key airline ready to buy TV show; another hunting. 
Southwest Airways are readying Jerry Fairbanks commercials featuring Jimmy 
Stewart. . . . SOAPS DOWN, SYNTHETICS UP As SPONSOR reported in FALL FACTS 
Issue (17 July) synthetic detergents will increasingly take ad play away from 
soaps because that's where sales are. Current year 6-month figures by American 
Soap & Glycerine Producers show true situation today. Soap sales were 11% below 
1949 ; synthetic detergent sales 60% up. Lever Brothers hopes to regain ground in 
the detergents sweepstakes this fall with strong radio and TV campaigns, some 
still feverishly in the making. But P&G and C-P-P are far in van with several prod- 
ucts each and don't show signs of slackening. . . . MOTOROLA'S $500,000 TWO- 
MONTH CAMPAIGN Some 130 radio stations are scheduled to carry two to 10 an- 
nouncements daily from mid-September through November for Motorola TV and radio 
sets. About 100 will be used for TV campaign; remainder for radio set sales. An 
extensive co-op radio and TV setup is available to dealers, too. . . . HAVANA 
TV RACE Two Cuban firms are straining to be first to put TV on air in Cuba. CMQ- 
TV, headed by Goar Mestre,and Union Radio SA, headed by Jose Antonio Mestre (not 
related), are constestants. Mobile units and transmitter equipment is being 
flown in. At this point looks like dead heat with start about 1 December. Initial 
programming will be done via film and mobile units during five evening hours. 
Baseball and fights will be initial most popular fare, with local beer and cigarette 
advertisers already vieing for favorable times. . . . ERA OF EXTRAVAGANZA 
Sunday night will be battle night for NBC and CBS this fall. NBC counters CBS's 
star-studded lineup with 2% hour radio counterpart of Sylvester Weaver's Satur- 
day night NBC-TV masterpiece. Fifteen and thirty minute segments will be sold 
to carefully-culled prospects. Eddie Cantor, Fred Allen, Bob Hope, Jimmy Durante, 
Ed Wynn, Ezio Pinza are representatives of name talent that $30,000 weekly will 
buy. If technique succeeds more multiple-hour shows will be in making. . . . 
HOLD-YOUR-BREATH TV STATION With purchase of 11 film serials including Flash 
Gordon, Buck Rogers, Don Winslow from Flamingo Films, WABD, New York, is set to 
keep moppets (and their poppas) on edge of chairs 30 minutes daily Monday through 
Friday. Purchase covers more than full year, with five serials alternating each 
day in week. Five sponsors will be signed. DuMont holds option on group for net 
use. . . . RADIO TV COMMENDED FOR STEMMING "STAMPEDE BUYING" Dr. John 
R. Steelman, assistant to the President, extended Nation's thanks to broadcasters 
for "magnificent, voluntary effort" in stemming "stampede buying." He told NAB 
Board that radio and TV should expect, during crisis era, only controls self-im- 
posed during World War II. 



SPONSOR 



Like them air-foam 
4£> cushions,lem ? 



// 



Ye 




.ESSIR! — our wealthy Red River Valley 
hayseeds buy the biggest and best of every- 
thing! With incomes far higher than the 
national average, fancy living comes easy! 



WDAY, Fargo, is the one sure-fire way to get 
at all this extra dough. Our well-heeled 
farmers listen to WDAY about four times as 
much us to any other station. Look at these 
record-breaking Hoopers : 



SHARE OF AUDIENCE (Dec. '49-Apr. '50) 




WDAY 


",B" 


"C" 


"D" 


Weekday Morning? 
( Mon. thru Fri.) 


64.2% 


21.1% 


7.3% 


4.8% 


Weekday Afternoons 
Mon. thru Fri.) 


66.5% 


13.0% 


12.9% 


2.6% 


Evenings 

(Sun. thru Sat.) 


64.0% 


15.1% 


9.5% 


8.8% 




A new 22-county survey by students at North 
Dakota Agricultural College shows that the 
farm families in these 22 counties prefer 
WDAY 17-to-l over the next station — 314- 
to-1 over all other stations combined! 

Get all the fabulous facts today! Ask us or 
Free & Peters ! 



FARGO, N. D. 



NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 




FREE & PETERS, INC., 
Exclusive National Representatives 



28 AUGUST 1950 




Vol. 4 no. 18 



28 August 1950 




Sponsor Reports 

510 Madison 

Queries 

Outlook 

JSew and Renew 

Wr. Sponsor: 

Robert Rrenner 

P. S. 

Radio Results 

Mr. Sponsor Asks 

Roundup 

Sponsor Speftks 

Applause 



I 

U 

7 

JO 

IS 

Hi 
17 
38 
42 
44 
72 
72 



COVeV shows broadcast of Doughboy pro- 
gram, Country Journal. Left to right: 
WCCO Farm Service Director Larry 
Haeg; announcer Gordon Eaton; Ray 
Young, editor, Wabasha County Herald- 
Standard; Herbert Feldman, Wabasha 
county agent; Dr. W. A. Billings, veterin- 
arian, College of Agriculture, U. of Min- 
nesota. (For story on how Doughboy is 
building a farm feed empire via radio, 
see page 24.) 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managinq Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Frank M. Bannister, Erik H. 
Arctander 

Assistant Editors: Fred Birnbaum, Arnold Al- 
pert, Lila Lederman, J. Liener Temerlin 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President — Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(West Coast Manager), Georqe Weiss 
(Southern Representative), Edna Yergin, 
John Kovchok 

Vice-President — Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Promotion Manager: M. H. LeBlang 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Jacque- 
line Parera 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 
INC. Executive, Editorial, Circulation, anil Advertising 
Offices: 510 Madison Ave.. New York 22. N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray II 111 8-2772. ChlruKO Office: 360 N. 
Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Financial 1556. West 
Coast Office: B087 Sunset Houlevard, Ix>s Angeles. 

• Hillside 8.111. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 

Ave.. Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United States 
JS a year. Canada and foreign $!). Single copies 50c. 
Printed In U. S. A. Address alt correspondence to 510 
Madison Avenue, New York 22. N. Y. Copyright 1950. 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



ARTICLES 



Jlervhandisiny is like fingerprints 

It varies with each radio station, newspaper or magazine; an advertiser may 
get none or a great deal, depending on each medium's special policy 



Douyhboy knows the farmer 

This farm feed producer experimented with radio, found business soared to a 
52% increase this year 



H hat sponsors say about their ayeneies: part II 

And they say plenty! They let their hair down to SPONSOR and lit into the 
agencies for a number of weaknesses 



All quiet on the union front 

This fall will see many contracts negotiated in the TV industry — but these wil 
not necessarily mean increased costs to sponsors 



Drug stores on the air 

Radio and TV, co-op and otherwise, are doing a low cost sales job for local 
independents as well as big drug chains 



SPONSOR INDEX: JANUARY-JUNE 1950 



IN; RUTHJRE ISSUES 



Wartime proyraminy 

A comparison conducted by SPONSOR shows it may be wise for a company 
to continue its wartime advertising even when it can't deliver 



Mohuwk uses u new broom 

Carpet manufacturer, recently user of printed media only, now allocates bulk 
of its budget to TV 



Station meri'hantlisiny for advertisers: part II 

How do stations stack up in merchandising cooperation with their advertisers? 
Part two of SPONSOR'S investigation helps answer this question 



Western programs 

The Western trail is being blaied with a will through radio and TV country. 
Cowboy drama and music rank high in airwave popularity 



21 



24 



20 



28 



30 



33 



11 Sept. 



11 Sept. 



11 Sept. 



1 1 Sept. 



6 or 7 

ITS EASY , 

WHEN YOU ©AYS 
KNOW HOW! L 



AUDIENCI 




.H 



ERE'S proof that KWKH know-how, built 
through 24 years of experience, pays off in larger 
audiences and in greater audience-loyalty. 

The 1949 BMB Report credits KWKH with a Day- 
time Audience of 303,230 families in 87 Louisiana, 
Arkansas and Texas counties. 194,340 families 
(64' o of the total daytime audience) listen to 
KWKH "6 or 7 days weekly"— 67,470 (or 22%) 
listen "3 or 4 days weekly", and only 40,510 (or 
14' J ) listen as little as "1 or 2 days weekly." When 
these figures are weighted in BMB approved man- 
ner, KWKH comes up with an average daily day- 
time audience of 227,701 families — or more than 
75' < of its total weekly audience! 

Shreveport Hoopers tell the same sort of story, 
i Month after month and year after year, KWKH 
consistently gets top ratings. Morning, Afternoon 
and Evening! 



Yes, know-how pays! 
KWKH, today! 



Get all the facts about 



HOOPERS TALK, TOO! 


Shar* of Audunc* 
(March-April, I950I 




KWKH 


"B" 


«%f» 


"D" 


Weekday Mornings 


44.6% 


17.0% 


25.2% 


12.9% 


Weekday Afternoons 


41.6% 


26.8% 


13.3% 


16.3% 


Evenings (Sun. thru Sat.) 


46.4% 


25.3% 


12.2% 


14.2% 


Sunday Afternoons 


27.9% 


23.2% 


18.5% 


26.4% 


Total Rated Time Periods 


43.5% 


24.0% 


15.5% 


15.4% 



KWKH 



50,000 Watts 



CBS 



Texas 



SHREVEPORTf LOUISIANA 



The Branham Company ArKAfflSAS 

Representatives 
Henry Clay, General Manager 




CKAC . . . 

IS YOUR PRESCRIPTION 

for belter results in the 
province of Quebec 

Ratings have their use but results 

are conclusive. 
Results determine the value of your 
advertising dollar and results 
are what the Metropolitan Life 
Insurance buys. Here is what 
Mr. A. L. Cawthorn-Page, Cana- 
dian Manager writes. "On basis 
of number of booklets requested 
by listeners and cost per request 
we are pleased to be able to 
state that station CKAC is 
among the leaders." 
Regardless of what you have to sell, 
in Quebec your cure-all is radio 
station CKAC. 

Results show that 7 out of 10 
French homes are reached by 
this station. 
J£ for "buzzing" Quebec's saleswise 
. . . "Casino', the participation 
show all agencies are talking 
about. 

Time: 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon 
10 minute segments available 

now. 
Present clients: 

Super Suds Colgate 

Noxema Odex 

Over 1,000.000 proof of purchase in 6 months 

CBS Outlet In Montreal 

Key Station of the 

A TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CEAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives: 

Adam J. Young Jr. - New York, Chicago 

William Wright • Toronto 



510 Madison 



REQUEST FROM LEVER BROTHERS 

In your recent July issue you offered 
several reports to subscribers on radio 
and television. Our Marketing Re- 
search Department is most anxious to 
obtain the following: Radio Is Getting 
Bigger. 199 TV Results, and TV Map 
For Sponsors — Fall 1950. 

Please forward one copy of each of 
the first two. and six copies of the map 
to the undersigned. 
Marie K. Hicks 
Marketing Research Department 
Lever Brothers Co. 
New York 



RADIO & TV RESULTS 

I noticed in your 17 July issue 
(Sponsor Reports) that radio and TV 
result stories on various businesses are 
available. 

We are particularly interested in any 
such facts and figures in so far as they 
relate to the gasoline and oil business, 
and while we are concerned primarily 
with radio at the moment in this re- 
spect, any success stories pertaining to 
this industry in TV would be most ap- 
preciated. 

We would also like to get copies of 
Radio Is Getting Bigger and 199 TV 
Results. 

Can you send us whatever you think 
would be pertinent to the above facts 
and figures on the gasoline and oil bus- 
iness, and if there is any charge con- 
nected with this service please bill us. 
I. S. Wallace 
MacLaren Advertising Co. 
Toronto 



WHAT PULLS EM IN? 

The 19 June, 1950 issue, page 24, 
carries a story entitled "What pulls 
em in : 

We would like to distribute reprints 
of this article to retailers in the New 
England market. Are you in a posi- 
tion to furnish these? 

Also, we would appreciate your pro- 
viding us with the address of Adver- 
tising Research Bureau, Inc. 

Myron L. Silton 
Sill on Brothers Inc. 
Boston 

• In response to numerous inquiries large num- 
bers of reprints have been made available at 
nominal eost. The American Research Bureau In- 
corporated is in Seattle. 



PER INQUIRY 

We agree wholeheartedly with your 
attitude toward P.I. on radio. That 
is. in so far as it means rate cutting 
by the station. 

We feel that our offer to manufac- 
turers for merchandising their product 
through the medium of television mail 
order is essentially a legitimate P.I. 
deal. We pay for all station time used 
at regular card rates and in return get 
a percentage of the sale price of all 
items sold. Naturally, we will not take 
any and all items on this basis. A 
product must perform its intended task 
efficiently and reliably and have suffi- 
cient sales appeal to warrant the ex- 
pense of the station time used. 

If any of your readers are interested 
in our program, they may obtain full 
details by submitting a complete de- 
scription of their product to us at Box 
1401. Hollywood 28. 

H. R. Martin 

H. R. Martin & Sons 

Culver City, Cat. 



FALL FACTS ISSUE 

Your last issue of sponsor is a mag- 
nificent job. We have filed three cop- 
ies for reference because we feel that 
it is a goldmine for both our research 
and promotion staff. We like particu- 
larly your objective reporting on the 
present status of spot radio. 
Seth Dennis 
Promotion Manager 
Edward Petry & Co. 
New York 



You are to be congratulated on the 
excellent job as evidenced by your last 
issue of sponsor magazine. 

This issue is not only "chuck-full 
of valuable information for sponsors," 
but will actually serve as positive edu- 
cational background for a better in- 
structed sales organization in radio 
throughout the country. That is ex- 
actly how we intend to use it here at 
WXLW. Please send us six additional 
copies at your convenience and bill us. 
Robert D. Enoch 
General Manager 
WXLW 
Indianapolis 



Can you tell me where we can find 
a listing of national manufacturers who 
I Please turn to page 71 ) 



SPONSOR 



Queries 



This feature presents some of the most interest- 
ing questions asked of SPONSOR'S Research Dept. 
Readers are invited to call or write for information. 
Address: 510 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 



Q. Can you tell us the stations and sponsor carrying the radio-TV 
account of the Detroit Tigers baseball games? 

Radio association, New York 

A. WWJ-TV carries the Detroit games on TV; WJBK-AM carries 

the radio account. The sponsor is Goebel Brewing Corporation. 

Q. In what issue of SPONSOR did you carry an article about 
Ronson? Publicity firm, New York 

A. A full-length story on Ronson appeared in the May, 1948 issue, 
page 39. Ronson was mentioned in the 5 June issue in our Out- 
look feature; the president of Ronson, Alexander Harris, was 
profiled in our 14 August issue. 

Q. When did the Old Gold Original Amateur Hour start on NBC? 

Advertising agency, St. Louis 
A. The Original Amateur Hour started on NBC 4 October, 1949. 

Q. Have you done any studies in radio program preferences of 
teen-agers or children? Clothing manufacturer, Chicago 

A. The following sponsor articles discussed teen-age or children's 
preferences in radio and/or TV programing: November, 1947, 
page 42; April, 1948, page 29; 23 May, 1949, page 21; 24 
October, 1949, page 22; 14 August, 1950. page 24. 

Q. Did SPONSOR ever carry any figures showing dealers' prefer- 
ence for radio advertising over newspapers, magazines and oth- 
er media? Broadcast association, New York 

A. See sponsor's "More power!" 24 October, 1949, page 28 and 
"Radio is getting bigger," a sponsor publication which contains 
information on the progress of radio advertising. 

O. Can you give me the names and addresses of the firms provid- 
ing "Tools of the Trade" mentioned in your 10 April issue? 

College professor, Columbia, Mo. 
A. Literally hundreds of names are involved in the "Tools of the 
Trade" section, but sponsor will be glad to supply information 
on specific firms mentioned. 

Q. We would appreciate any references you can supply on the use 
of radio advertising in the retail grocery and chain store field. 

Broadcasters' association, Los Angeles 
A. See Radio Results pages in sponsor 13 March, 10 April, 8 May, 
5 June, and 3 July; also see report on Dun & Bradstreet survey 
of grocers, other retailers in 17 July issue, page 54. 

Q. Your first query on page 12 of the 17 July SPONSOR interests 
us as weVe doing a study on the subject. Where did you get 
your information? Advertising agency, Kansas City 

A. The query was: what percentage of children view television in 
comparison to adults viewing it? Fact-Finders Associates In- 
corporated, 400 Madison Avenue, New York, was the source of 
this information. 



[ 



■'.'■• »'• 



V 



In Pennsylvania's 
Lehigh Valley 

LA TEST 

HOOPER 

(Share of Broadcast Audience) 

RATING 

(March-April 1950) 

Allentown-Bethlehcm 

AREA 

Shows 




ALLENTOWN, PA. 



OGDEN R. DAVIES 

Manager 



1 



I 12:00 Noon 
St thru 

i 6:00 P. M. 



WKAP 34.0 

Station "A" .. 24.2 

Station "B" .. —- 7.9 

Station "C" 6.7 

Station "D" 6.6 

. . . and in the Morning — 

WKAP 20.3 

Station "A" .. -16.7 

Station "B" -25.1 

Station "C" .. -12.0 

Station "D" - - 4.7 

The Lehigh Valley's Outstanding 
Independent Station featuring 
Personalities . . . Music . . . News ! 



COMING SOON! 
Full 
Time! 



1320 kc. 



28 AUGUST 1950 





. . . She has won the respect and affection of probably 
more people than any person in show business. 



. . . She has received the most imposing array of awards* 
citations and honors of any woman in entertainment. 



. . . She has been called ff America's greatest salesman. 



. . . She was chosen, from among scores of stttrs, 
for the leading part in a great new venture- 
NBC daytime television. 





Daytime television goes bigtime . . . 

On September 25, "The Kate Smith Show" <>jx-ii> on NBC Television, Mondays 
through Fridays, 1 to 5 p.m. eastern time. 

Kate Smith, of course, will sing. She will introduce varietj acts — interview 
interesting people — present the latest fashion news — devote a spot now and then 
to home economics — talk with colorful people — offer a weekly dramatic 
highlight. Producer Ted Collins will handle the news, and a full orchestra will 
pro\ ide a musical background. 

Kate Smith will do more than merel) entertain. She will help sell her sponsors' 
products. Her matter-of-fact sincerity will roll up big sales in a short time at a low 
; cost. Her merchandising possibilities are endless. 

I If you have a product on the way up. here's a short cut lo the top. If your product 
is already first in its field, here's just the thing to push it even higher. 
Whatever you sell, Kate Smith will bring you a record-breaking audience heavily 
loaded with your best prospects — the women of America — who will buy what 
you sell because it's on "The Kate Smith Show." 

The Kate Smith Show is available for sponsorship in segments of 15 minutes or 
30 minutes once a week or more. We have a presentation giving more 
facts — with figures to back them up — on this big daytime buy. Naturally, we want 
you to see it. 




Forecasts of things to come, as 
seen by sponsor's editors 



Outlook 



War-shortage fears 
spur farmer buying 

Tractor and implement sales began to lag last year for 
the first time in 10 years. Manufacturers prepared them- 
selves for a 10 r 'r to 30 r ; reduction in 1950 volume. War- 
shortage fears, however, have spurred farmer buying and 
manufacturers report sales of everything from plows to 
corn pickers. Allis Chalmers, Firestone, and other radio 
advertisers will probably increase their advertising tempo 
to take advantage of the spurt in sales because "The farm- 
er wants to buy" 1 see sponsor article. 27 February, 1950). 

Food manufacturers puzzled: 

more money spent on candy than other foods 

The average family spends 25.2 cents a week for candy. 
This compares with 23.7 cents for canned juice: 21.5 cents 
for cakes; 19.8 cents for shortenings; 18.7 cents for soups; 
16.3 cents for white flour. These figures, released by the 
Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics, have 
the food makers thinking hard. More use of spot radio in 
areas where candy consumption is higher than consump- 
tion of various foods might be the solution. 

Butter sales decline as 
production increases; oleo gains 

Butter production in the first half of 1950 was up to 750,- 
000,000 pounds. This was 100,000.000 pounds over a 
1944-48 first half average. Consumption, however, is 
waning, with government price support officials taking 
185,000,000 pounds off the market. With heavy use of 
spot radio, oleo manufacturers show a much healthier 
picture. Margarine makers expect to sell a billion pounds 
this \ear as compared to 853,000,000 pounds in 1949. Ra- 
dio figures prominently in their sales picture with Nucoa 
(Best Foods); Blue Bonnet (Standard Brands); Jelke's 
(Lever Brothers); Parkay (Kraft Foods); and others 
using the medium to keep sales up. 

Big institutional advertisers may 

stay out of video and rely on radio alone 

Most big national manufacturers interested in getting their 
institutional message across plan to rely solely on radio 
as their air vehicle. Radio's greater coverage, as com- 
|i.uiil to video, gives them the large audience they want 
for institutional messages at minimum cost. Prime ex- 
amples of the radio-institutional variety are U. S. Steel's 
Theatre Guild on the Air and the Goodyear Tire & Rub- 
ber Company's The Greatest Story Ever Told. For their 
commercial messages, Goodyear has Paul Whiteman's 
Goodyear Revue returning Sunday, 8 October on ABC. 



Coffee vs. tea battle increases 
in tempo; ad budgets up 

Coffee sales have been down in recent months while tea 
sales have spurted upward. To maintain this upsurge, te; 
manufacturers are hammering hard to increase tea con- 
sumption. Some $5,000,000 will be spent this year for 
radio, TV and other media, almost double last year's bud- 
get. To spur lagging coffee sales, the Coffee Growers 
Federation in South America has a fund of $2,000,000 
for a U. S. campaign. At present, the Pan American Cof- 
fee Bureau sponsors Edwin C. Hill's The Human Side of 
the News (M-W-F, ABC). Regionally, the tea-coffee fray 
is waged via spot radio. 

Small air conditioning unit latest 
giant in appliance field 

Room air conditioner manufacturers turned out some 
100,000 units worth about $40,000,000 retail this year. It 
was one-third more than the 1948 figure and three times 
as high as the best pre-war year. 1941. Now, outside of 
TV sets, air conditioners loom as the country's fastest 
growing appliance. The Philco Corporation says air- 
conditioning business accounts for 5' "< to l r '< of total 
sales. Air conditioning may soon share the advertising 
limelight with video. 

Low priced TV sets not 
impeding rise in radio set sales 

Despite low-priced TV sets, radio set sales are expected 
to be higher in the next five years than in the 1935-39 
period. Joseph B. Elliott, vice president in charge of 
RCA Victor consumer products says: "The novelty of 
television has worn off and radio holds a very strong day- 
time position and a substantial evening audience." Radio- 
Television Manufacturers Association members report they 
made 5.228,170 radio sets in the first half of 1950, com- 
pared with 3.481.858 in the first six months of 1949. 

Differences in regional tastes make spot radio 
ideal for frozen concentrate advertising 

Juice concentrates continue to grow in popularity. The 
frozen orange concentrate was first on the market. Since 
that time, lemon concentrate, apple, grape and a mixture 
of orange and grapefruit have been in various stages of 
development. With these varieties on the market in the 
near future, look for spot radio to introduce these juices 
in regions where taste preferences warrant their sale. 

Cigar sales not keeping pace 

with other tobacco products; drive launched 

The cigar branch of the $5,000,000,000 tobacco industry 
is not keeping pace with the sales growth shown by other 
tobacco products. In the first six months of 1950 about 
2,573,000,000 cigars were shipped, a 4.2' , decline from 
last year. To hypo sales, the National Association of 
Tobacco Distributors has started a two-month radio-news- 
paper campaign in an attempt to increase sales to $300.- 
01)0.000 for the second half of 1950. First half sales 
amounted to $220,000,000. 



10 



SPONSOR 




WESTERN MUSIC PAYS OFF! 



WLS has known and profited by this 
knowledge for over a quarter century 



The interest in western music and cowboy 
entertainers that has swept the country is 
not new or surprising to WLS; it's basic 
in American life and history. WLS, rec- 
ognizing this, featured such entertainment 
from the day of its inception. 

Among early WLS stars was Gene 
Autry, a National Barn Dance favorite 
in the early '30s. Then came Louise Mas- 
sey and the Westerners; next, the "Girls 
of the Golden West." Later, Rex Allen, 
"The Arizona Cowboy," held the spot- 
light among WLS entertainers until he 
joined Republic Pictures in Hollywood 
as a featured western film star. 

And today, at WLS, it's BOB ATCHER 



"Top Hand of the Cowhands"— western 
singer, Master-of-Ceremonies, top audi- 
ence getter. Bob's a favorite in city, small 
town and on the farm. Commercially suc- 
cessful, too, with a long list of satisfied 
sponsors. For western music that pays off in 
sales results think of WLS's Bob Atcher. 
For complete details on how western 
music and WLS can pay off for you, con- 
tact your John Blair man ... or write 
WLS, Chicago 7, Illinois. 



•WMI# < 



890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, ABC NETWORK - REPRESENTED BY Yv JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 




28 AUGUST 1950 



11 



in the rich West Virginia market • • • 



it's "personality" that counts! 




: f *#*^" 







"yyrct 







the famous Personality Stations ® 
deliver the BETTER HALF! "& 



BMB has proved it! The "Personality Stations" 
are first in the rich, densely-populated area where 
West Virginians spend the better half of their dollar. Further- 
more, it's such an easy task to capture your share . . 
one advertising order, one bill and presto—you 

earn a smackingly low combination rate that makes 
the three "Personality Stations" the one 
really outstanding buy in the field. 



J* 



SO. 65% of total population 
52.38% of retail sales 
56.94% of general merchandise sales 



represented nationally by WEED & CO. 



12 



SPONSOR 



New and r 




28 August 1950 



New on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Bird Products 
Inc 

Amurul Products Co Inc 
Chamberlain Sales Corp 
Department of the Army 

Organized Resen e 
llamm Brewing Co 
Lever Brothers Co 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco 

Co 

Pal Blade Co. 

Pan Am Southern Corp 

Pel Milk Corp 

Procter & Gamble Co 

Reddi-Whip Inc 

The American Bakeries Co 

The Block Drug Co 

The Rhodes Pharmacal Co 

The Serutan Co 



\\ eston-Barnett 

O'Nell, Larson & McMahon 

BBD&O 

Grant 

Camphcll-Mithint 
RuthraufT & Ryan 
Cunningham & \S al>h 

Al Paul Lefton 

Fitzgerald 

Gardner 

Benton <X Bowles 
Ruthraufl & Ryan 
Tucker Wayne & Co 
Cecil & Presbre) 
O'Neil, Larson & McMahou 
Rov S. Durstine Co 



American Radio A\ arnlers 



Su 



1-1:15 pin; 22 Oct; 26 wks 



MBS 


127 


MBS 


•too 


NBC 


159 


CBS 


25 


CBS 


173 


NBC 


166 


MBS 


131 


CBS 


15 


NBC 


149 


CBS 


31 


CBS 


175 


ABC 


35 


ABC 


215 


MBS 


211 


ABC 


200 



Gabriel Heatter; Th 7:30-45 pin; 14 Sep; 52 wks 
Cecil Brown & The News; Sat 7:55-8 Jim; 16 Sep; 52 wks 
Mindy Carson Sings; T, Th, Sat 11:15-11:30 pin; 17 Aug; 12 pro- 
grams 
Edward B. Murrow; M-F 7:45-8 pin; 4 Sep; 43 wks 
Arthur Godfrey; M-F 10-10:15 am: 2 Oct; 52 wks 
Bob Hope Show; T 9-9:30 pm; 3 Oct; 52 wks 

Rod & Gun Club of the Air; Th 8:30-55 pm; 7 Sep; 52 wks 
Edward B. Murrow; M-F 7:45-8 pm; 16 Oct; 37 wks 
Fibber McGee & Molly; T 9:30-10 pm ; 19 Sep; 52 wks 
Edward B. Murrow; M-F 7:45-8 pm; 14 Aug; 52 wks 
Godfrey Digest; Sun 2:30-3 pm ; 1 Oct; 52 wks 
The Lone Ranger, M, W, F 7:30-8 pm ; 11 Sep; 52 wks 
Quick As A Flash; T, Th 11:30-11:55 pm ; 19 Sep; 52 wks 
Gabriel Heatter; Sun 9:30-9:45 pm; 20 Aug; 52 wks 
News commentary; M 12:25-12:30 pm ; 18 Sep; 52 wks 



Renewals on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Tobacco Co 
Armour & Co 
Carter Products Inc 
Coca Cola Co 
Cream of Wheat Corp 
Gold Seal Co 
Lutheran Layman's 

League 
National Biscuit Co 
Philip Morris Co 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 

Co 
Richfield Oil Corp 

Sterling Drug Co 

The Rhodes Pharmacal Co 



BBD&O 

Foote, Cone ci Belding 

SSC&B 

D'Arcy 

BBD&O 

Campbell-Mitbun 

Gotham 

McCann-Erickson 

Biow 

William Esty 

Mm. \ Humm & Johnstone 

Dancer-Fit zger aid-Sample 
O'Neil, Larson & McMahon 



CBS 


183 


CBS 


181 


CBS 


141 


CBS 


181 


CBS 


154 


CBS 


174 


MBS 


366 


CBS 


173 


CBS 


172 


CBS 


163 


CBS 


32 


CBS 


145 


MBS 


211 



Jack Benny; Sun 7-7:30 pm; 1 Oct; 52 wks 

Stars Over Hollywood; Sat 1-1:30 pm; 16 Sep; 52 wks 

Sing It Again; Sat 10-10:15 pm; 30 Sep; 52 wks 

Edgar Bergen; Sun 8-8:30 pm ; 1 Oct; 52 wks 

Let's Pretend; Sat 11:05-11:30 am; 16 Sep; 52 wks 

Arthur Godfrey; M-F 10:30-10:45 am; 28 Aug; 52 wks 

Lutheran Hour; Sun 1:30-2 pm; 24 Sep; 52 wks 

Arthur Godfrey; M-F 10:45-11 am; 4 Sep; 52 wks 
Horace Heidi Sun 9:30-10 pm ; 3 Sep; 52wks 
Bob Hawk; M 10:30-11 pm ; 2 Oct; 52 wks 

Charles Collingwood; Sun 1-1:15 pm; 2 Sep; 18 wks 
Larry LeSueur; Sat 6:45-7 pm ; 2 Sep; 18 wks 
Sing It Again; Sat 10:30-11 pm; 7 Oct; 52 wks 
Gabriel Heatter; T 7:30-7:45 pm ; 52 wks 



New National Spot Radio Business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKETS CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



American Chicle Co 

American Wine Co 

County Perfumery Ltd 
Esso Standard Oil Co 

General Electric Co 
Lever Brothers 
Ralston Purina Co 
Stoppers Inc 



Dentync 

Cook*s Early American 

grape wine 
Brylcrcem hair dressing 
Petroleum products 

Bulbs 

Silver Dust 
Instant Ralston 
Chlorophyll tablets 



Badger, Browning & Hersev Scattered regional inlets 

N. Y.) 



Ilixson & Jorg 



(L.A.) 



Atherton & Currier (N.Y.) 
Marschalk & Pratt (N.Y.) 

BBD&O (N.Y.) 
SSC&B (N.Y.) 
Gardner (St. L.) 
Walter Weir (N.Y.) 



L.A., St. L., Chi. 

Test campaign 
26 stns; Arkansas 

32 mkts 
National 
48 mkts 
Indianapolis 



Anncmts; 3 Sep through December 

Anncmts; Oct 

Anncmts; \aried starting dates 

U. of Arkansas football games; 23 

Sep; 10 wks (Saturdays only) 
Anncmts; 11 Sep; 15 wks 
One-min ET's ; 7 Sep; 8 wks 
Anncmts; Oct 
Test campaign; late Sep 



National Broadcast Sales Executives 



jVetg and Renew 28 August 1950 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



John P. Altemus 
Ted W. Austin 
James C. Fletcher 

G. P. Hamann 

Louis H a usm an 
GU Johnston 
C. M. Meehan 
Robert A. Street 
Harvey St rut hers 
John F. Surrick 
* ) liver Trevz 



U, S. Polo Assoc, adv mgr of prog book 
WFMY-FM-TV, Greensboro, N. C, prop dir 
KFAB, Fairbanks, sis staff member 

tt BR< Birmingham, lech dir and m^r FM. TV opera- 
tions 
CBS, N.Y'., head of sis prom and adv dept 
WBBM, Chi., rep on N.Y. sis staff 
Westinghouse Radio Station- Inc. Phil a., dir of pub rel 



CBS Radio Sales, Chi. 

WFIL, WFIL-TV, Phila.. si- dir 

ABC, N.Y., presentation writer 



CBS Radio Sales. N.Y., acct exec 

WOSC, Fulton. N.Y., gen mgr 

Midnight Sun Broadcasting Co (N.Y. office) caster 

WBRC-AM-TV, gen mgr 

Same, vp in charge of sis prom, adv 

CBS l(. i.li.> Sales, N.Y'., acct exec 

WBZ-WBZA, Boston, sis mar 

ABC, Hlywd.. radio, tv acct exec 

Same, N.Y., acct exec 

NX FBR. Balto.. vp, gen mgr 

Same, N.Y'., dir of sis presentations 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



I ■ in. ii Anderson 
Albert Chop 
Edward J. Doherty 
Fred F. Drucker 
Bernard T. Ducey 
William L. Dye 
George Hampton 

John S. Hewitt 
Henry J. IN or man 

E. J. Schujahn 
Robert E. Smith 
Clifford Spillcr 



Dr. Han 



Zeisel 



Tea Bureau, N.Y'., research dir 

Fuller & Smith & Ross. Cleve. 

American Airlines, N.Y., asst pub rel dir 

New by & Peron, Chi., acct exec 

Van Cleef Brothers, Chi., sis mgr 

Young & Rubicam, N.Y . 

General Foods Corp, N.Y"., gen mgr of Franklin Baker 

div in Hoboken and the Philippine- 
Andrew Jergens Co, Cincinnati, vp 
Union Pharmaceutical Co, Montclair, N.J. (div. of the 

Schering Corp), asst sis mgr 
General Mills, Mnpls., dir gen flour sis 
O 'Cedar Corp, Chi., adv and sis prom office mgr 
General Foods Corp, N.Y ., sis, adv mgr of Franklin 



Bake 
McCain 



div 

■Erick" 



N.Y. 



ir research 



Thomas J. Lipton Inc. N.Y., research dir 

Storm Windows of Aluminum Inc. Ravenna, O.. sis prom mgr 

National Airlines. Miami, pub dir 

R. Gerber & Co, Chi., dir of sis, adv 

O'Cedar Corp, Chi., sis mgr 

Liebmaun Breweries Inc, N.Y., adv mgr 

Same, opers mgr for Franklin Baker. Waller Baker Chocolate and 

Cocoa, Diamond Crystal-Colonial Salt X Elect ricooker divs 
Anahist Co, N.Y., gen mgr, \ p 
Union Pharmaceutical Co & subsidiary Artra Cosmetics Inc, sis 

mgr 
Same, vp 

Same, adv and -Is prom mgr 
Same, gen mgr of di\ 



Tea Bureau Inc. N.Y'., re 



ih di 



New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



A Ives Photo Service Inc. Quincy 
American Machine & Foundry Co, N.Y . 
The Baldwin Piano Co of New York 
Blatz Brewing Co. Milw. 
C. A. Briggs Co, Cambridge 
By mart Inc, N.Y. 
Custom-Craft Metal Co, Phila. 
\. Gettleman Brewing Co, Milwaukee 
International Mineral- »*C Chemieal Corp i Amino 

ucts div), Chi. 
Jamison Bedding Inc, Nash\ ille 
Jcl-Sert Co. Chi. 
Ko-Z-Aire Inc. Red Oak, la. 

Lectrieovers Inc, N.Y. 

Manning ton Mills Inc, Salem, N.J. 

Modern Food Process Co, Bridget on, N.J. 

Nyo-lene Laboratories Ltd., N.Y". 

Olga Co, L.A. 

Pacific Coast Packers Ltd, New Westminster, B. C. 

Pearson Pharmaral Co, N.Y . 

Peerless Mattress Co, Lexington, V C. 

Raab-Meyerhoff Co. Phila. 

Rockwood »K Co. S. F. 

The Simoniz Co, Chi. 

Skinner A Pel ton Inc, Chi. 

Stonecutter Mills Corp, N.Y. 

Storm Windows of Aluminum Inc, Ravenna, Ot 

The Herbert Hosier) Co, Norristown, Pa. 

Wyler & Co, Chi. 



Y uleeards 

Stitching machine div 

Pianos 

Blatz beer 

II-B cough drops 

Hair dye 

Juvenile metal furniture 

Brewery 

"Accent" food seasoning 

"Sweet SI u in her" lexlite mattresses 
Gelatin desserts and pudding- 
Winter air conditioners 
Electric blankets 
Hard surface floor coverings 
"Thrivo" dog and cat food 
"Olga" undergarments 
Fil mast] ue Facial 
"Kreine Whipt" salad dressing 
En nds chlorophyl tablet*. 
Mattress manufacturer 

Shirt. 

( Ihocolate candy 

All "Simoniz'* products 

"Silavox" earphone attachment for i 

I abrics 

Combination windows and doors 

Men's Arg\le hosiery 

Soup mixes 



Bresniek & Solomont. Boston 
Fred Winner, N.Y. 
Anderson. Davis & Plane, N.Y. 
William H. Weintraub & Co, N.Y. 
Chambers & Wiswell Ine, Boston 
Cecil & Presbrcy, N.Y. 
Cray & Rogers. Phila. 
Hoffman & York, Milwaukee 
BBD&O, Chi. 

Uoyne, Nashville 

Mauriee Lionel Hirseh Co, St. L. 

I -iiiL Ii .ii.iiii. i & Assoc. Omaha 

Walter Weir Ine, N.Y. 

Wayne. Phila. 

Lamb ,\ Keen Ine, Phila. 

O'Brien X Dorrance, IN. Y. 

J. Walter Thompson Co, L.A, 

O'Brien, Vancouver, B.C. 

Harry B. Cohen, N.Y. 

Piedmont, Salisbury, \.C 

J. M. Kom & Co Ine. Phila. 

Plait-Forbes, S.F. 

SS( &B, N.Y. 

Gourfain*Cobb, Chi. 

Mire. I J. Silberstein, Bert 

Howard Swink, Marion. <>. 

John LaCerda. Phila. 

V . i~. & teller. Chi. 



Id.milh Inc. N.Y. 




r^. 



&F3£Rfrk3&5><> 



^rO^gLao.'gx^ | 



HE OUTDRAWS 'EM ALL ! 



iz^ 



&€^&k3&3^ 



-VC7SS^O-TOCX 



...He's done it year in 
and year out on radio, 




J movie screens, records and 
personal appearance tours. Now Gene Autry, 
greatest cowboy of them all, brings his phenomenal 
drawing power to television! 

He's got a sure-fire show.* First film series made 
expressly for TV by a top Western movie star, it's 
loaded with action . . . features Gene and his horse 
Champion, Pat Buttram, Sheila Ryan, the Cass 
County Boys and all the Autry hands. 

In the words of Variety: "Autry indicates that he 
can hold his own on video. He's transplanted his 
screen personality to this medium in a manner 
that will continue to hold a high degree of favor." 
New York Daily News: "Typical Autry entertain- 
ment, a compound of action and good humor." 
The New York Times: "Snappy horse opera." 

Want to put your brand on it? Just call your 
nearest Radio Sales representative. He'll give you 
complete information — and tell you whether it's 
still available in your area. 



*A CBS-TV Syndicated Film series of half-hour Western films, each a complete 
drama. Represented exclusively by Radio Sales — New York, Chicago, San 
Francisco, Detroit, Memphis, Los Angeles. 



28 AUGUST 1950 



15 



Television's TOP Sales 
Opportunity 

WILMINGTON 



—first 



in income per 



family among all U S 
metropolitan centers 
°t 100,000 or over 

Safes Management 
1950 Survey of 
Buying Power. 



DELAWARE 

oi figures 

Bureau 7/2/50. 



^ 



a- 

The only 

Television station in 

Delaware — it delivers 

you this buying 

audience. 



If you're on Television 

WDEL-TV 

/s a must. 



Represented by 

ROBERT MEEKER 

Associates 
New York San Francisco 

Los Angeles Chicago 




3/r. Sponsor 



Robert Brenner 

Director of advertising and merchandising 
B. T. Babbitt, Inc., N. Y. 



"We began using radio on a consistent basis 14 years ago." 

This statement by Robert Brenner, director of advertising and 
merchandising for the B. T. Babbitt Company, is more than a pass- 
ing remark. It is probably no coincidence that he himself joined 
the company 14 years ago. 

'*We have found radio our best bet for advertising," says Brenner. 

His office reflects his radio-consciousness. A portable radio sits 
behind him; a network area map hangs from one office wall. "We 
want to appeal to the housewife at her housework, and radio does 
this effectively for us." 

Brenner isn't a dabbler in radio. It's big business at Babbitt. 
The company sponsors two daytime shows, David Harum on NBC 
and Nona From Nowhere on CBS. In one form or another. Babbitt 
as been selling with David Harum for 14 years, and today the show 
is aired over 58 stations Mondays through Fridays. 11:45-12 noon. 
Nona From Nowhere, new this year, is on 149 stations, Mondays 
through Fridays. 3:00-3:15 p.m. The total cost of the two programs 
is about $30,000 weekly. The company also uses a limited number 
of scattered announcements. 

All in all. Brenner now devotes 80' r of his ad budget to radio. 
I Last year it was 75%.) It's estimated that he has a total annual 
budget of $2,500,000. For 1949. total sales for Babbitt amounted 
to $16,867,300, about $500,000 more than 1948. Sales have in- 
creased steadily since 1940. when they amounted to $5,596,998. 

When Bob Brenner first came to Babbitt as advertising manager 
there was only one employee in the department. Today there are 
14. Previously, he worked for Standard Oil Company of New Jersev 
as assistant advertising manager; for General Motors in their New 
York offices. He also did free-lance advertising and writing. 

Bob is considered an expert on premiums, constantly uses them 
in all his advertising. Results have been amazing. When the I I I- 
year-old company made a two-week silk stocking offer, "orders 
for 100.000 dozen pairs of silk stockings poured into my office," 
said Brenner, "in 15 working days." 

Bob spends 40' < of his time traveling, does much of his own sta- 
tion relations work. His is a familiar face to station managers. 



16 



SPONSOR 



\<>iv developments on SPONSOR stories 



ps 



SeG ! "Tips to a news sponsor" 

IsSlie: 19 June 1950, p. 30 

SllbJ6Ct: News programing 



Tempo-ture of news programing rises as we pass from a cold war 
to a hot one. 

SPONSOR described, in "Tips to a news sponsor." the trend toward 
news-program Iisleiiin<j brought on by the cold war. Now again, 
news listening jumps ahead due largely to the war in Korea; and 
news sponsorship picks up proportionately. All the networks and 
stations around the country indicate increased activity. 

According to ABC. a recent Pulse survey in the New York area 
found that 16 out of 18 news or commentary programs had ad- 
vanced. The 18 hail an over-all average of 3.0 in July compared to 
2.6 for June. Walter Winchell was first among all programs. Drew 
Pearson's rating at 6:00 p.m. went from 5.7 in June to 6.6 in July. 

CBS, in its all-out effort, claims that at least 650 people contribute 
to each CBS world news roundup. It has added new programs, such 
as You and World Trouble Spots which began 21 August. 

Rhodes Pharmacal Company recently signed Gabriel Heatter for a 
Sunday 9:30 p.m. EDT news program over the Mutual network. 
ABC is editing and rebroadcasting the highlights of each day's 
United Nations meeting. These are scheduled for an indefinite 
period. NBC is currently airing Public Affairs, a series of discus- 
sions about national defense. 

Local stations also report increased interest in and sales of news 
programs. For example, KJR in Seattle added two major news 
strips, sold them within three weeks. Its most recent sale, the 6:00 
p.m. dinner edition of the news with Dick Keplinger, was sold to the 
Shell Oil Company on a 52-week basis. The other sale was A Peek 
Over the Back Fences of the World with Sheelah Carter, sold to the 
Lincoln First Federal Savings and Loan Company of Seattle. 

Stations like WDRC in Hartford promote their news programing, 
use lie-ins on other news programs, spots, and co-op plugs. WNAX 
in Yankton used a free Korean map offer to its listeners. In a little 
ever two weeks the printing order of 35,000 maps had been virtually 
exhausted. 



p.s 



See: "Seward's folly: 1950' 

IsSUe: 5 June 1950, p. 28 

Subject: Radio in Alaska 



There's been no sleeping during the long northern nights for the 
Alaska Broadcasting System. 

In "Seward's folly: 1950," sponsor reported the mounting inter- 
est of national advertisers in Alaskan radio. Now, the ABS an- 
nounces five more national spot contracts: Pillsbury, Budweiser, 
Nucoa, Carnation, and Pan American World Airways. 

Pillsbury has contracted for a 15-minute world newscast every 
Sunday on three of the northern group stations. Budweiser is 
scheduled to use one-minute spot announcements on all stations be- 
ginning 2 October. Carnation has contracted for one-minute spot 
announcements for 22 weeks on all stations. 

Best Foods' Nucoa has extended their contract from August, 1950, 
through 31 June, 1951 on all the ABS stations. Pan American World 
Airways has renewed its 15-minute newscast on five days a week to 
run through 20 July, 1951. 



COVERAGE 

Sure... We've Got It 

BUT... 

Like the Gamecock's 
Spurs... It's the 

PENETRATION 
WSPA*™ 



In This 
prosperous 



(.SO 




BMB Report No. 2 Shows 
WSPA With The Largest 
Audience Of Any Station 
In The Area! 

AND... This Hooper 
Report Shows How WSPA 
Dominates This Area! 



HOOPER RATING -Winter 1949 

8:00 AM - 12:00 N 63.2 

12:00 N •• 6:00 PM 53.6 

(Monday thru Friday) 
6:00 PM ■■ 10:00 PM . . . 67.6 
(Sunday thru Saturday) 



GIVE YOUR SALES 
A POTENT PERMANENT HYPO 




Represented By: 

John Blair & Co. 
Harry E. Cummings 

Southeastern Representative 

Roger A. Shaffer 

Managing Director 
Guy Vaughan, Jr., Sales Manager 



CBS Station For The 
Spartanburg-Greenville 



Market 



5,000 Watts -- 
950 On Your Dial 



28 AUGUST 1950 



17 



MISTER PLUS 



LOOKS 
UNDER 
A WELCOME 
MAT 
AND 
FINDS A 
FRIENDLY 
KEY 



What set out to be the first full study of radio listening 
throughout Home Town America has become a measure 
of a welcome mat one-fourth the size of the entire U. S. 

Crossley, Inc., conducted 551,582 telephone-coinci- 
dental interviews in 116 cities in 42 states, 10 a.m. to 10 
p.m. on weekdays and 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. on weekends, 
for four consecutive weeks in April, 1950. 

The 116 cities were selected as precisely represent- 
ative of MutuaFs 325 "solo" markets — each one served 
from within by one Mutual Network station alone, and 
from without by other stations. 

Ihis research reveals overwhelming, continuous prefer- 
ence for Mutual ... a red carpet of a welcome mat whose 
dimensions are specified on the opposite page. A thorough 
analysis of its day by day texture — morning, afternoon 
and night — is yours for the asking. 

lJig-city coverage is common to all networks. But the key 
to Home Town America, where 11,000,000 radio families 
live and spend and listen, awaits you under this mat. 
Here you are assured a heartier welcome than any other 
network or any other medium can possibly earn for you . . . 



the difference is Mutual! 



f 







■ ■ ■ ' 



Share of audience, day and night. . 



MUTUAL 
55% 




HVLCON&. WSFZCOM^ tV£LCON<S. WZZCONfe. M4FZCOM&. W£LC 



NETX 
16% 




HtftCOMfe. VY£LCQ 



NETY 
15% 




y 



W£LCGH&. tY£U 



dependent 

9% 




IY£LCON&. 



NETZ 

5% 



y 



W£U 



TV? Exactly one-tenth of one per cent of all respondents reported any television listening. 



The Mutual Broadcasting System 




■ 





'■ <*~.rw< 




•\ 



. 






\ 



- 





RAUtO 1 \ D TEL E V I St O \ STATION REPRESENT 1 T I V E S 



NEW YORK 

BOSTON 

CHICAGO 

DETROIT 

SAN FRANCISCO 

ATLANTA 

HOLLYWOOD 





GIRL MAKES SURE STORE STOCKS PRODUCT WAVZ ADVERTISES. MERCHANDISING BOOST FOR SPONSOR VARIES WITH STATION 

Merchandising is like fingerprints 



There's no standard for the amount or kind the 

advertiser gets from media, whether hroadeast or printed 



over-ail 



Some do and some don't. 
Some do a great deal of it 
— others very little. And a thousand 
variations in between. 

We're talking about radio station 
merchandising for sponsors. 

Merchandising by media on behalf 
of advertisers began with newspapers, 
then spread to magazines. When radio 
came along, many advertisers were al- 

28 AUGUST 1950 



ready conditioned to the idea of media 
expanding their activities into whole- 
sale and retail selling operations. 

Actually, merchandising by media 
just grew without plan; proof of this 
is the complete lack of uniformity of 
services offered by printed and broad- 
cast media. Advertisers and their agen- 



An article on merchandising dealing with spe- 
cific station services will appear in next issue. 



cies themselves are at odds over what 
is "normal" in the way of merchandis- 
ing help. 

Part of this confusion arises from 
the failure to recognize the distinction 
between merchandising a product in 
retail stores and promoting the station 
and its programs. The first is strictly 
a direct product-push at the retail lev- 
el; the second is an advertising pro- 
motion to build up circulation or audi- 



21 



<5* fPySiPK S Stiri'Vy of station merchandising revealed disagree- 
ments galore. But several oft-repeated opinions stood out pro and con. 

Pro-3Ierehandislny 

\, Small advertisers need distribution, primarily. Merchandising convinces 
retailers "something's doing," makes them stock the product. 

2. Advertising is only "half" the job; merchandising is the other half. There's 
no point in convincing consumers if retailers haven't the goods to sell. 

«"J. Merchandising gives less-preferred stations a bargaining weapon, allow- 
ing them to trade more services for less power or audience. 

-J» By conscientious merchandising, a station can build a valuable reputation 
for cooperating with national advertisers. This pays off in more billings. 

,">. Properly handled, merchandising gives local retailers a friendly aware- 
ness of the station, may lead to more business. 



Anti-Merchandislng 

X. Money spent by stations on heavy merchandising tends to come out of 
higher rates. There is no such thing as a "free lunch." 

2. Audience promotion is broadcasting's proper function. Merchandising is 
another kind of selling — which should be done by the sponsor himself. 

3. Stations find it hard to know where to draw a line on merchandising 
requests. Some advertisers want too much; some very little. 

1. A great deal of merchandising service is mere lip-service and 
puffery. 

5. Most advertisers buy a station for its audience, consider merchandising 
as a "bonus," no more. 

>9" {PDI&9PK makes no specific recommendation except that stations keep 
local wholesalers and retailers abreast of current campaigns in their specific 
fields. Additional help is a matter between station and advertiser. 



ence. By the first definition, merchan- 
dising includes window displays of the 
product, stack cards, post cards and 
letters to distributors and dealers — 
anything that ties in directly with fea- 
turing the product on retail shelves. 
Station and program promotion aims, 
on the other hand, at corralling more 
loyal listeners. 

sponsor has just surveyed scores of 
station managers, advertising agency 
executives, and advertisers in its quest 
for common denominators in the com- 
plex merchandising picture. It found 
sound reasons for and against mer- 
chandising as it is being done today. 
Inevitably, the nature of each bird's- 
eye view depended mainly on whose 
"tree" the viewer looked from, and 
how high up he was on it. 

Advertisers and their agencies, con- 
cerned as they are with all media, are 
prone to match radio merchandising 
services against those provided by the 
printed media. Rather than ignore 
broadcast advertising's competitors. 
SPONSOR feels that a straightforward, 
factual reporting of printed-media mer- 
chandising adds perspective to consid- 



eration of similar radio practices. Es- 
sentially the findings are the same for 
all media : each is a crazy-quilt of non- 
conformity. 

Neither the Bureau of Advertising of 
the ANPA, nor the Magazine Advertis- 
ing Bureau are able to shed much light 
on what their members are doing. Cer- 
tainly there is no policy on merchan- 
dising; each member publication sets 
up its own standards. Radio organi- 
zations are equally non-committal on 
merchandising services. 

The discreet silence of media asso- 
ciations is echoed by their counterparts 
in the advertising field. The Associa- 
tion of National Advertisers has not 
discussed the subject at least for sev- 
eral years; has no general rules. Nei- 
ther has the American Association of 
Advertising Agencies. However, the 
AAAA has a statement of practices 
which its members are advised to use 
when dealing with newspapers. 

Says the AAAA: "An agency may 
properly accept any amount or kind of 
merchandising cooperation a newspa- 
per volunteers. However, it should not 
demand or encourage free services that 



Pro-Merchandising 

Agencies-Advertisers 

"Station merchandising is certainly an im- 
portant factor in timebuying, though it is 
not a requisite. Letters to the trade on what 
the advertisers are going to do radio-wise 
should be expected from the radio stations: 
store displays, etc., are appreciated {nat- 
urally ) . So far as we are concerned, sta- 
tions have done a very excellent merchan- 
dising job. They will bend over backwards 
to try and help you; very few will turn 
down reasonable merchandising requests." 
Head Timebuyer — 
Large advertising agency 
j 
"Merchandising is certainly taken into con- 
sideration when buying time. Many stations, 
for example, have merchandising plans with 
food markets. When you want to make sure 
that your brand is going to get notice and 
preference on shelves, it's only good sense 
to put your advertising on these stations." 

Timebuyer — 
Medium-sized advertising agency 

"In the case of our company we have a 
small sales force and can't get around so 
easily to find out how effective our radio 
advertising is. In one market we found out 
after a campaign that we only had 25% 
distribution. The campaign flopped, of 
course, and I had to fight to keep that sta- 
tion on our schedule." 

Advertising manager — 
Large margarine manufacturer 

"We do our part to encourage the stations 
to merchandise, though generally speaking 
the main burden rests on the stations. We 
supply them with suggestions on newspaper 
ads, publicity stories, house organs, bill- 
boards, car cards, commercials, letters to 
dealers, window and counter displays." 

Timebuyer — 
Large advertising agency 

"/ think a lot of stations could do lots more 
in bringing buying power to the fore by 
proper merchandising. WLW, Cincinnati, 
by its extensive operations, has done an out- 
standing job in this respect." 

Timebuyer — 
Medium-sized agency 

Stations 

"Speaking generally, I would say that any 
station can profit by a sound merchandising 
plan, scaled in proportion to the facilities 
of the station and its market. W hatever ser- 
vice is offered must be delivered in full and 
must be in proportion to the cost of the ad- 
vertising sold." 

Genera! manager — 
3.000-Hatter, Northeast 

"The easiest thing for a timebuyer to do is to 
buy high Hoopers. But they don't encourage 
the retailer to display the product properly 
or push it. A call from, or a direct mail 
contact by, the Merchandising Department 
of a station will do a great deal more to- 
ward selling the product ultimately than 
anything else that can be done in connec- 
tion with buying radio time." 

General manager — 
.>.000-watter, Midwest 



Anti-Merchandising 

Agencies-Advertisers 

"The trouble with merchandising is that 
some advertisers and agencies want lots of it 
and others don't much care. The advertisers 
who get merchandising are adding costs to 
the station s overhead. And these additional 
costs ivill eventually be reflected in higher 
rates for all advertisers, whether or not they 
use the merchandising services. In effect, 
this amounts to special treatment for one 
segment of advertisers at expense of all." 

Vice-president — 
Medium-sized advertising agency 

i "We would rather have a station put their 
money into audience-building promotion, 

1 rather than merchandising. We have a 100- 

i man sales force and have had 100% distri- 
bution for quite a while. It's fine if the sta- 
tion wants to send out mailings to retailers, 
especially if there is a special gimmick pro- 
motion going on. As for calling on dealers, 

I we find it doesn't mean very much for us." 

Advertising manager — 

Large drug manufacturer 

Stations 

"/ am of the opinion that our station is in 
the broadcasting business, and that it is not 
our fob to get distribution, set up point-of- 
purchase displays, nor do anything that is 
actually foreign to the broadcasting of pro- 
grams and/or announcements. Of course, a 
small amount of merchandising is not bad, 
but once you start, it is hard to stop. The 
advertiser demands more — pits one station 
against another, and I have known of cases 
in competitive markets ivhere the stations 
actually spent much more merchandising 
products than they received from the adver- 
tising schedule." 

General manager — 
250-watter, Middle-Atlantic state 

"Broadcasters are in the business of broad- 
casting. They should stick to it. If a sta- 
tion wants to set up a merchandising serv- 
ice as such, it might be done; but the ad- 
vertisers should be charged for services 
rendered — outside of those which arc purely 
broadcasting." 

Promotion director — 
50,000-watter, Middle-Atlantic state 

"A station that indulges in merchandising 
help is demeaning its own medium. Its 
proper function is to provide an audience 
and to do this it should promote its audi- 
ence through programing. Merchandising 
is a different means of selling and has no 
real connection with radio advertising. Why 
should radio compete with itself?" 

Station manager — 
50,000-watter, Northeast 

"/ think that a station's efforts with the 
trade are largely wasted and not efficient. 
I feel that they are at best simply a gesture 
to the client. The idea is that futile ges- 
tures cost money and will weaken our real 
and essential fob of audience promotion. 
We spend $40,000 a year on audience pro- 
motion." 

Business manager — 
50,000-watter, South 




Newspaper supplements, radio, magazines all merchandise advertiser's products with posters 



are not a proper function of newspa- 
pers or are in excess of what is gen- 
erally regarded by newspapers as prop- 
er service to the advertiser. 

"Merchandising costs unfairly shift- 
ed to publishers have a tendency to in- 
crease rates for all advertisers, whether 
they use such services or not." 

In all fairness, radio and TV should 
be included in this dictum to advertis- 
ing agencies. Even if this were done, 
the question of what is "generally re- 
garded as proper" is exactly the point 
of the whole controversy. Some adver- 
tisers feel that radio is not doing 
enough for them in a merchandising 
way. They base this on what they be- 
lieve the printed media are doing. Al- 
though radio practices have not yet 
been exhaustively examined and each 
stations activities plotted, the broad- 
cast medium appears to offer about as 
much as the printed media, no more, 
no less. 

Of the 1,781 daily newspapers pub- 
lished in the United States, the 1950 
Yearbook of Editor & Publisher lists 
only 710 as offering merchandising 
aid. The batting average of radio sta- 
tions is apparently as good. 

What do newspaper services consist 
of? Deutsch & Shea, Inc., New York 
advertising agency, made a survey sev- 



eral years ago of daily papers in c^ies 
of 50,000 persons and over. Of the 
377 papers ivho answered their query, 
some 80% said they wrote letters to 
distributors and dealers, informing 
them of advertising campaigns. Other 
services, in order of popularity, were: 
(1) providing an advertiser's sales 
force with dealer names; (2 1 giving 
market data; (3) making personal 
calls on dealers and distributors; (4) 
supplying mat service to retailers; (5) 
preparing local trade surveys; (6 I dis- 
tributing advertisers' sales promotion 
material to outlets; (7) providing win- 
dow display space for products; (8) 
setting up displays in retail stores; and 
(9) creating sales promotion material. 
Indicative of how the number of pa- 
pers performing all these services trails 
off at the end of the list is the fact that 
only 17% of the respondents created 
and produced sales promotion materi- 
al: only 18% set up retail displays. 

Although 62% of the 377 papers 
covered in the Deutsch & Shea survey 
do not specify a minimum space con- 
tract for advertisers to benefit from 
merchandising, comments from indi- 
vidual papers all agreed : the amount 
of advertising placed definitely deter- 
mines how much help an advertiser gets. 
I Please turn to page 66) 




COUNTY DEALERS GET ADVANCE PUBLICITY DOPE FROM MILLING DIV. HEAD PAUL RAY ON RADIO SALUTE TO THEIR AREA 

Doughboy knows the farmer 

Wisconsin feed mills boom with radio in experimental stages: 
now it's full speed ahead using' merehantlisahle programs 







A fanner doesn't change 
his feed brand lightly. 
It takes a lot more than ordi- 
nary selling to get him to switch to a 
new brand; his choice of feeds is a 
major selling factor in the healthy, 
speedy growth of his livestock and 
poultry, for quick fattening means ex- 
tra dollars in his pocket. He won't 
jeopardize his earnings by impulses. 

That's why Midwestern feed dealers 
arc rubbing their eyes at the mush- 
room growth of Doughboy feeds. In 
three years, the Milling Division of 
Doughbo) Industries. New Richmond. 
\\ isconsin, has more than doubled its 
business. It has tripled its field force 
and expanded its dealer outlets (which 
covered on h \\ isconsin I to Minnesota. 
Iowa. Illinois, and upper Michigan. 
Business this year is already running 
>'2' , ahead of last year's record. 

I In- sudden surge followed the coin- 
pan) s decision to concentrate its ma- 
jor L950 advertising budget in radio. 



24 



Doughboy had used some radio be- 
fore, along with newspapers and re- 
gional farm journals. That was almost 
inevitable. Reason: President E. J. 
Cashman was advertising manager for 
Hormel before he took over the small 
Doughboy operation in 1935; he 
sparkplugged the original Spam and 
other famous campaigns. At Dough- 
boy, he was eager to try a medium that 



could excite people about his products. 
Co-owner W. J. McNally, who heads 
WTCN. Minneapolis, knew radio in- 
side out. Paul Ray, vice president in 
charge of the Milling Division, and 
still in his early thirties, came up 
through the Doughboy ranks. These 
men all knew that farm families spend 
more time with radio than with any 
other form of entertainment. 



Publicity streamers such as these brighten the windows of Doughboy feed outlets. Musical programs with 

listen to 

THE TOWN HALL DOUGHBOYS 

-.cousin ram 

EVERY DAY MON.THRU SAT, 12:1512:30 P.M. WBAY j 




The Finest Feeds in the Finest Bags 




PREMIUM FEEDS, 



New Richmond, Wisconsin 



SPONSOR 




Energetic E. J. Cashman, Doughboy president, keeps eye on shows Modern, highly mechanized feed plant erected in 1947 serves five states 



When Cashman came to Doughboy 
in 1935, he worked on the theory that 
in many important respects, ''farmers 
like the same things city people like. 
If clean, modern, conveniently ar- 
ranged stores appeal to city people, 
farmers, too, will buy more goods in 
pleasant surroundings/' 

He began to help operators set up 
model feed and farm supply stores. 
The dealers owned them, but were 
helped and advised by Doughboy mer- 
chandising experts. Today, there are 
500 such model stores in the five states 
where the company has distribution. 

The company employed 40 people 
when Cashman took over in 1935. Its 
sales area comprised the few counties 
immediately adjacent to New Rich- 
mond. The Milling Division I feeds 
alone) now employs about 200. The 
company has expanded its interests to 
include such diverse products as in- 
flated plastic toys I which get a radio 
boost as needed ) and a printing plant. 

World War II made farmers every- 
where more conscious of what can be 
done by tackling feeding problems sci- 
entifically. In earlier years, it took up 
to two years to fatten a hog for market. 



Now it had to be done in six months, 
or the farmer stands to lose mone) . 
Doughboy, after the war, was prepared 
to go full steam ahead with a campaign 
to popularize scientific feed concen- 
trates. 

Hostilities ended, Cashman and his 
associates prepared to expand their 
feed outlets. They first tried announce- 
ments. These were effective in backing 
up the company's salesmen in the role 
of feed experts instead of mere feed 
peddlers. But progressive farmers were 
beginning to rely more and more on 
farm news and market reports as aids 
in doing business. Almost every sta- 
tion with an important segment of farm 
listeners had one or more such sessions 
on the air. 

About three years ago the Dough- 
boy strategists decided to allocate ad- 
ditional advertising dollars for five- 
minute news and market reports on 
various stations, including nine of the 
Wisconsin Network. The Wisconsin net 
programs were on Mondays, Wednes- 
days, and Fridays. 

Previously, the announcements had 
made themselves felt; but the five-min- 
ute programs aimed directly at farm- 



ers hit the bullseye. They were easier 
to sell to dealers, too, when salesmen 
solicited new accounts. Sales contin- 
ued to climb swiftly. 

Early last spring, Cashman and Ray 
took careful stock of what they had 
learned about radios role in selling 
Doughboy feeds. They knew it was 
a potent factor. Not only had their 
salesmen discovered this from talking 
to farmers directly; feed merchants 
were impressed, and they are the back- 
bone of a manufacturer's prosperity. 

The Doughboy ad council came to a 
major conclusion: they should have 
programs that lent themselves to a 
greater degree of exploitation, and 
were therefore easier to sell to dealers 
than the shows they had been using. 
They also decided that 15-minute or 
longer programs would give them more 
time to tell the Doughboy story of sci- 
entific feeding. 

This decision tied in perfectly with 
the Cashman penchant for vigorous 
merchandising ( he's a stickler for the 
little things that add up to better sell- 
ing). He discovered that the standard- 
style Doughboy posters in feed stores 
{Please turn to page 46 I 



jrural flavor counterpoint company's farm service programs. Doughboy furnishes all point-of-sale material KXEL's McGinnis does Doughboy Journals 





BREAKFAST SYMPHONY 

6:00-6:15 A.M. wWl /^ 

WK0W m 




DINNER CONCERT ^ 

12:00-12:15 P.M. 

wmm w - w 



Doughboy 



EVERY DAY MON. THRU FRI. 

PREMIUM FEEDS New Richmond, Wisconsin 
The Finest feeds In The Finest Bags 




28 AUGUST 1950 



25 





RADIO DIRECTOR: dreaming up a new program while perched in his own ivory tower TIMEBUYER: this is one of the younger specimens of the Ibw ! 

What sponsors think of agencies 



PART TWO 



OF A 2-PART STORY 



"I trust them as I would my company lawyer," 

said one; then he took off his velvet gloves 



The advertising agency ex- 
ecutive with a glass in one 
hand and a golf club in the other is 
rapidly joining the traveling medicine- 
oil hawker and the six-gun-toting cow- 
boy on the list of vanishing Americans. 
Hucksters, if many ever existed out- 
side Fredric Wakeman's imaginings, 
are the rarity today. 

That's the verdict of advertisers who 
were asked to tell SPONSOR their key 
gripes against agencies. Almost all of 
the executives in the 15 large and me- 
dium-sized companies surveyed pref- 
aced criticism of agencies with enthus- 
iastic praise for their over-all perform- 
ance and integrity. 



26 



But, with equal fervor, advertisers 
lit into agencies for: (1) their failure 
to equip account executives with broad 
enough sales and media experience; 
1 2 ) the suspected weakness of some 
agency timebuying departments; (3) 
the agency's tendency to ease up in its 
production of fresh ideas once a radio 
or TV show is safely underway; (4) 
ivory-tower thinking about radio or 
TV shows designed to reach a mass 
market; (5) the agency's failure to de- 
velop adequate merchandising services 
to push the sponsor's product and his 
programs) ; (6 I the agency's tendency 
to push whatever medium it is best set 
up to handle, whether it's the one best 



for the product or not; (7) the agen- 
cy's unceasing ( and frequently irritat- 
ing) drive to get the client to spend 
more advertising dollars. 

In its last issue. SPONSOR gave 15 
representative medium and large-sized 
agencies a chance to let their hair 
down (anonymously) about sponsors 
I "What agencies would tell clients . . . 
if they dared" I . This article, designed 
to tell the other side of the story, is 
based on confidential interviews with 
advertising managers: and on letters 
written to SPONSOR in reply to last is- 
sue's article. 

Purpose of all this blood-letting: to 
give executives on both sides of the 

SPONSOR 




Jaro Hess Caricatures 

The grotesque yet winningly 
cunning caricatures on these 
pages poke fun at advertis- 
ing agency executives. They 
are part of a series by artist 
Jaro Hess which includes five 
key figures of the broadcast 
advertising world. The set is 
available free to new and re- 
newal SPONSOR subscrib- 
ers; cost to others, $4 each. 



<,east choosing radio stations 



ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: he wouldn't have to flee before a client's wrath if he knew radio 



fence new insight into mutual prob- 
lems: to remind sponsor-firm and 
agency personnel about old principles 
of advertising teamwork which mav 
tend to get obscured in the day-to-day 
press of work. 

The great majority of advertisers 
quizzed stressed the role of the account 
executive in satisfactory agency-client 
relationships. Said one hard-bitten, 
outspokenly critical advertising man- 
ager in a firm with a million-dollar 
budget: "I went through three account 
men till I got one that was any good. 
Even a top-notch agency may give you 
poor service unless you have the right 
account executive supervising work on 
\ our radio or TV show/' 

What makes an account man bad? 
Sponsors* answers range from limita- 
tions in the account executive's career 
background to criticisms of his char- 
acter. 

One young advertising manager, 
who had worked up the hard way, con- 
trasted his personal background with 
that of many agency account men. "I 
was a salesman on the road right after 
[Please turn to page 59) 



These are hey sponsor criticisms 
of advertising agencies 

• Many account executives lack sales savvy 

• Timebuying is left to inexperienced juniors when top men 
are tied up 

• Agency efforts ease up once client's show is safely launched 

• Some radio directors incline to professional pomposity, ivory- 
tower thinking 

• Agency merchandising services are weak 

• Agencies have "Don't rock the boat" attitude, reluctance 
to suggest necessary changes 

• It's a "survey" when an agency does it; only "hearsay" when 
the client gathers opinion informally 

• Agencies push too hard to up billings 



28 AUGUST 1950 



21 



Ill quiet on the union front 

There'll be talent, makeup and wardrobe, 

and scenic contracts negotiated this fall- 
but don't worry, the approach is realistic 



ttk Most TV unions have 
been realistic in their 
approach to the medium. 

They have been realistic, by and 
large, in their agreement on wage 
scales which have permitted the ma- 
jority of stations to develop satisfac- 
tory and edge into the black. 

The fact that three IATSE I Interna- 
tional Association of Theatrical Stage 
Employees ) unions — Stage Hands. 
Wardrobe Mistresses and Makeup Men 
— in addition to the United Scenic 
Artists of America, and four talent 
(performers) unions, will be negotiat- 
ing new agreements with the networks 
this fall has given some advertisers 
uneasy moments. They're fearful that 
the normally rising program costs of 
television may be fast accelerated by 
higher union wages. 

Increased union scales are a distinct 
probability in some categories. This 
will not necessarily increase program 
costs in every case. There is, in fact, 
no certainty that it will significantly 



increase costs to the sponsor in the 
overall picture. 

Reports that all unions fear a wage 
freeze by the government, and are out 
to get all they can before the freeze 
clamps down, have developed some 
sponsor uneasiness. They've been 
helped along by leaks concerning de- 
mands to be made. This despite the 
fact that anybody who knows anything 
at all about union-management nego- 
tiations over wages and working con- 
ditions knows that the real offers and 
demands don't come until after weeks 
of lusty sparring. TV networks and 
unions are no exception to this time- 
honored system. 

One ad manager who will spend a 
young fortune in network TV starting 
this fall asked sponsor : 

"Suppose the military situation 
forces up the cost of things like paint 
and wood that it takes to air my show. 
Then suppose labor costs zoom. Where 
do we stand?'' 

This is symptomatic of the kind of 



alarm that can cause one advertiser to 
hesitate while a competitor walks away 
with a prize time slot. The competitor 
will have taken a closer look at the 
status of union wage negotiations. 

The wardrobe and makeup people, 
who handle costumes, makeup and 
hair dressing of actors, were organ- 
ized within the last year. The network 
contract which will probably be signed 
this fall will be their first. It will not 
necessarily mean an increase in total 
cost of programing, though there will 
be wage increases. This is because the 
salaries set will be minimums. Under 
present scales, some people already get 
more than such a minimum will call 
for. Only some 85 people will be cov- 
ered in these categories by September. 

Working conditions in almost all 
cases form an important part of union 
demands; wage demands up to a cer- 
tain point will often be traded for de- 
sired "conditions.'' This makes it dif- 
ficult to predict the effect of possible 
iPlea.se turn to page 48) 



ft. Makeup technicians recently organized, joined TV union family 10. Scene painters prepare NBC-TV set (union designations, right) 





28 



SPONSOR 






Some of the unions* inrolretl in TV production 



1. Boom Operators— IATSE, IBEW, and NABET. 

2. Cameramen (and Asst.)— IATSE, IBEW, and NABET. 

3. Dolly Operator— IATSE, IBEW, and NABET. 

4. Lighting Technician— IATSE, IBEW, and NABET. 

5. Floor Manager — UOPWA, IATSE, and Radio and Television 
Directors' Guild. 

6. Actors — AFRA, Actors Equity, Chorus Equity, Screen Actors' 
Guild, Screen Extras' Guild, AGVA. 



7. Video Control Engineers— IBEW, IATSE, and NABET. 



S. Director — Radio and Television Directors' Guild, Screen Direc- 
tors' Guild. 



9. Makeup Men and Assistants — IATSE. 
10. Property Men— IATSE; Scenic Artists— USAA. 

* Stations have contracts with only one union covering any one craft. 
The unions listed cover staff men at different networks, with only one 
union in each category working at CBS, the studio illustrated. 



28 AUGUST 1950 



29 




PETE DILEO'S ROPPOLOVILLE PHARMACY INCREASED ITS BUSINESS 400% VIA WJBO (BATON ROUGE) PROGRAM SCHEDULE 



1 SPONSOR roundup 



Drug stores on the air 

Local independents, big chains use radio/TV for low-cost 
sales job. In Peter Dileo's case store traffic jumped 1,000% 



over-all 



Peter Dileo, of Dileo's 
Roppoloville Pharmacy, 
Baton Rouge, loves to give Easter par- 
ties for the kiddies. 

They've always been a whopping 
success. But in 1948 Pete added a new 
ingredient — he decided to broadcast 
them over WJBO — and now customers 
are flocking into his store from 100 
miles around. 

Each year now Pete uses radio for 
his parties and his day-in-day-out drug 
store business. Last year he wrote the 
station: "Since we opened our new 
sloic. gross -ales have increased almost 
five times. We feel that your radio 
station has helped make this possible." 

Pete Dileo of Baton Rouge is typi- 
cal of the numerous druggists through- 
out the nation who arc discovering the 
power of radio. A sponsor survey, 
just completed, finds an awakening in- 
terest that augers heavier usage in the 
fall of 1950. 

The air is coming into prominence 
among retail druggists for many rea- 
sons: (1| the sales effort is improv- 



ing; (2) increased co-op advertising; 
1 3) proofs of low-cost-per-thousand; 
1 4 1 the example of key firms like 
\v algreen's, People's, Rexall, Whe- 
Ian's; (5) the snowballing use of TV. 

According to a recent report by the 
Broadcast Advertising Bureau of the 
National Association of Broadcasters, 
"Drug manufacturers like Whitehall, 
Block. Emerson, Norwich, and Ster- 
ling spend about 14' v of their gross 
sales on advertising." But on the re- 
tail level the situation is vastly differ- 
ent with an average of 1.2'< for 
chains, and slightly lower for indepen- 
dents. 

Chains are. by far, the most aggres- 
sive merchandisers and promoters. A 
chain's organization is usually impor- 
tant enough to command the attention 
ol the drug manufacturers. The man- 
ufacturer will chip in plenty to adver- 
tise his product through the chain's 
name. Current best examples are two 
hour-long television shows on the Du- 
Mont network, Cavalcade of Stars and 
Cavalcade of Bands. 



Both were created as cooperative 
deals between drug manufacturers 
and retail chains throughout the TV 
listening areas; the Stars a year ago 
last June, and the Bands the middle of 
January 1950. Each show costs ap- 
proximately $18,000 a week, is han- 
dled through the Product Advertising 
Corporation. About 28 drug manu- 
facturers alternate sponsorship on the 
two, and share the total cost of each 
show ( four participants per show I . 
Latest figures from the PAC office in 
New York City indicate 19 drug 
chains totaling 2.117 stores in 20 ma- 
jor markets tieing in with the pro- 
grams. The largest chain in each area 
had first crack at such local tie-in. 

Whelan's, a typical participant, af- 
fords a good example of how a chain 
blends into the Cavalcade programs. 
According to Axel Gudmand, live-wire 
advertising and sales promotion man- 
ager. "Our $3,500 is all invested in 
five or six film strip commercials. We 
are allowed a half-minute before the 
(Please turn to page 50) 



30 



SPONSOR 




■ 



OfMNOS" fc 






DRUG STORE ADVERTISING ACTIVITY AROUND THE COUNTRY: Chains and independents show widespread usage of radio and TV. 
(Top, left) Pantaze Drug Company on WMPS, Memphis; (Middle) Whelan's, N. Y., TV tie-in with WABD; (Bottom, left) contract signing 
for transcribed "Rexall Rhythm Roundup"; (Top, right) Gray Drug Co. on WHK, Cleveland; (Bottom, right) Rexall on KNX, Los Angeles 




Hitch your newscast to a star 



Yes, Willie WISH, the #1 Newsboy in Indianapolis,i9 busy 
adding extra news programs to the daily schedule. 
He's advising you to hurry and join the list of accounts 
already anchored with news programs on WISH. 
Take a look at this list of accounts sponsoring news 
programs: 

Italian Swiss Colony Wine 

Kraft Southside Baking Co. 

Gaseteria, Inc. 

Abels Auto Company 

Sterling Brewers, Inc. 

Mid-Continent Petroleum Corp. 

Geo. Weidemann Brewing Company 

Bruce Savage Realty Company 

Frank Fehr Brewing Company 
For complete details on these extra news programs consult 
any Free & Peters Colonel. 



that powerful puller in Indianapolis . . . 





w^sh 



OF INDIANAPOLIS 

affiliated with AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY 

GEORGE J. HIGGINS, General Manager 
FREE & PETERS, National Representatives 



* 



iiuh>.\' 




t <pliiitu> 4 



JANUARY THROUGH 
JUNE 1950 

ISSUED EVERY SIX MONTHS 



/tutomofiee and Lubricants 

Co-op advertising 16 Jan. p. 34 

Charles Ervvin Wilson, General Motors Corp., 

profile - 13 Feb. p. 1 1 

Tide Water Assoc. Oil Co.'s sportcasting 

success 13 Feb. p. 15 

Auto advertisers can do better 13 Fel>. p. 24 

W. Alton Jones, Cities Service Co., profile .... 13 Mar. p. 16 

Donald W. Stewart, Texas Co., profile 5 June p. 16 

Automotive advertisers turning more to radio 

and TV ..... ... 19 June p. 18 

Broadcasting Problems and Developments 

Critique on co-op advertising 16 Jan. p. 34 

Lightning that talks, industry film 30 Jan. p. 37 

How to sell radio as effective medium 30 Jan. p. 56 

Factors contributing to increased use of spot 13 Feb. p. 36 
Will out-of-home audience entitle stations to 

increased rates? . 27 Feb. p. 38 

Radio abounds in awards of questionable 

value 27 Mar. p. 28 

What broadcasters think of NAB _. 10 Apr. p. 26 

Tools of the trade for people in radio & TV 10 Apr. p. 34 

Radio rates: which way should they go? _ 24 Apr. p. 28 

What organizations assist sponsors most 

effectively? _ 24 Apr. p. 36 

Foreign language listeners 8 May p. 23 

Summer doldrums a myth in Minneapolis 8 May p. 34 
Why sponsors should stay on the air in 

summer 8 May p. 44 

Clothing 

Co-op advertising _ 16 Jan. p. 34 

Ida Rosenthal, Maiden Form Brassiere Co., 

profile 8 May p. 20 

Lee Hats sales up in Montgomery shift 5 June p. 26 

Furrier uses air 22 years without mentioning 

price „ - 5 June p. 42 

Robert Hall $1,500,000 air effort leads field 19 June p. 21 



Contests (fitcf Oilers 

Are giveaways declining? 13 Mar. 

Local giveaways growing 10 Apr. 

Mail order pulls for RCW Enterprises ... 22 Maj 

Social security pays off for sponsors .. 19 June 



Drugs and Cosmetics 

Resistab, antihistamine drug, clicks 2 Jan. 

Norwich Pharmacal Co. sponsors "The Fat 

Man" 16 Jan. 

Co-op advertising 16 Jan. 

Toni's new radio camapign 13 Mar. 

Lydia Pinkham's radio recipe 27 Mar. 

Ammi-dent picks radio 19 June 

Farm Radio 

The farmer wants to buy 27 Feb. 

Station farm service features _... 27 Mar. 

Fowler McCormick, International Harvester 

Co., profile 27 Mar. 

Farm tours promoted by WOW 22 May 



Food and Beverages 

Leroy A. Van Bornel, Nat'l Dairy Products 

Corp., profile 2 

How radio sold peaches in Cedar Rapids, 

Iowa 30 

Radio credited with selling milk in San 

Francisco 30 

Chiquita expands use of banana market 13 

Tumbo pudding cracks N.Y. market with 

premium offer 27 

Radio's record coffee sales for Isbrandtsen 13 
Chiquita Banana on CBS-TV . 22 

Maxwell House Coffee gets an airlift 22 

Harry W. Bennett Jr., Jelke Good Luck 

Products, profile 19 



p. 38 

p. 20 
p. 28 
p. 38 



p. 18 

p. 22 
p. 34 

p. 18 
p. 30 
p. 18 



p. 19 

p. 6 

p. 16 
p. 42 



Jan. 


p. 16 


Jan. 


p. 43 


Jan. 

Feb. 


p. 48 
p. 20 


Feb. 
Mar. 
May 
May 


p. 22 
p. 28 
p. 22 
p. 32 



June p. 16 



Commercials and Sales Aids 

Singing commercials, hottest thing in radio 2 Jan. p. 26 
Favorite commercials of TV Critics Club re- 
vealed 2 Jan. p. 32 

How well does your TV commercial sell? 16 Jan. p. 32 

Commercials with a plus 30 Jan. p. 24 

TV commercial demonstrated outside studio 13 Feb. p. 15 

TV commercials that sell 13 Mar. 

The disk jockey's responsibility . 13 Mar. 

How to ad lib TV commercial for refrigerators 5 June 



18 
30 
42 



Confections ami Soft Drinks 

Walter S. Mack Jr., Pepsi-Cola Co., profile 16 Jan. p. 16 

"Life With Luigi." Wrigley package on CBS 16 Jan. p. 

Soft drink leadership study 27 Feb. 

How Grapette grew; half million for spot 

radio helped .-_.. 8 May p. 28 

Peter Paul's newscast advertising 5 June p. 17 



22 
17 



Insurance and Finance 

Louisville Savings and Loan Assn. credits 

radio with growth 2 Jan. 

Prudential's radio success 30 Jan. 

Leroy A. Lincoln, Metropolitan Life Insur- 
ance, profile 24 Vpr. 

Prudential Life's Jack Berch pulls enormous 

mail 24 Apr. 

\Ia»-achu-etl- Insurance Compan\ sells safet) -'I \|n. 



p. 28 
p. 52 

P . 12 

p. 34 
p. 35 



Miscellaneous Products and Services 

Railroads need better radio 2 Jan. p. 30 

\iili tie use of broadcast advertising 16 Jan. p. 28 

U.S. Steel's ad budget goes to win friends 13 Mar. p. 24 

Foreign language listeners are loyal 27 Mar. p. 24 

Lewis H. Brown, Johns-Manville Corp., profile 10 Apr. p. 18 

Intercollegiate Broadcasting System function 10 Apr. p. 20 

Moore Paints' seasonal network show pays off 10 Apr. p. 32 



BINDERS are available to accommodate six-month supply of issues indexed. Cost is $4.00 per binder. 
28 AUGUST 1950 33 



Magazines on the air 24 Apr. 

"Housewives' Protective League" sells women 24 Apr. 

Quaker Rugs spends entire budget on broad- 
casting and clicks 24 Apr. 

Mohawk Carpet Mills builds employee good 

will by radio 24 Apr. 

Big name testimonial? help sell storm windows 8 May 

Leroy A. Wilson. A.T.&T., profile _ 22 May 

$900,000 worth of toy-balloons through mail 

order radio 22 M;i> 

Bobby Benson sells 40 products without bene- 
fit of sponsor 22 May 

How to sell a candidate 22 May 

.National advertisers flocking to Alaska .. 5 June 

Programing 

Singing commercials are hot 2 Jan. 

Sport program clicks for Nat'l Brewing Co. 

on TV 16 Jan. 

Package programs return to networks 16 Jan. 

Co-op programing 16 Jan. 

After-midnight programing 13 Feb. 

Keep your program natural 13 Mar. 

The disk jockey's responsibility 13 Mar. 

Baseball, bigger than ever _ Hi \pr. 

Live or film TV programing? . 10 Apr. 

Early morning programs 24 Apr. 

WRVA's recipe for low-budget advertisers 24 Apr. 

Programing for summer selling 8 May 

Summer programing needn't be threadbare 

patchwork 8 May 

Baseball continues to grow in radio and TV 22 May 

Television program costs are up 22 May 

Should crime programs on air be reduced? 22 May 

The Great Godfrey 5 June 

Feature films sensational but scarce 5 June 

Good music sells goods in many markets 5 June 

Tips to a news sponsor 19 June 

Hovi lo use TV films effectively 19 June 

Public Service 

Massachusetts Insurance Company sells safety 24 Apr. 
.Mohawk builds employee relations through 

broadcasting 24 Apr. 

Publicity ami Promotion 

Hot weather promotion for summer selling 8 May 
Station and department store's joint promo- 
tion . 5 June 



p. 14 
p. 19 

p. 24 

p. 34 
p. 42 
p. 18 

p. 28 

p. 34 

p. 38 
p. 28 



p. 26 



L8 

21 
34 
28 
26 
30 



p. 30 
p. 48 
p. 14 
p. 34 
p. 38 



in 
22 
25 

II 
21 

30 



p. 3 1 
p. 30 
p. 32 



p. 35 
p. 35 

p. 38 
p. 43 



Radios, TV Sets, Electrical Appliances 

Co-op advertising ._ 16 Jan. p. 34 



Research 

Who listen- hi FM in Washington, D. C? 

BBM works in Canada 

Hon well does your TV commercial sell? 

Radio facts culled from Lightning That Talks 

Daytime listening varies by localities ._ 

New BMB study makes 1946 statistics ob- 
solete 

Radio's big plus measured accurately at last 

Three top questions on how to use new BMB 
measurement 

Mow many radios in your home? 

New T\ research gives accurate number of 
impressions .... 

TV influences choice of brands 

Radio's uncounted millions 

Basic differences between TV and radio ..... 

No summer hiatus .... 

No hiatus on summer sale- 
Will TV repeal radio's summertime error? 

ts Hooper shortchanging radio? 

Si Iiai Tin prove- psychologically compatible 
messages best 

Mi i ann-Erickson technique for estimating 
Station's share of audiences 



16 Jan. 


p. 18 


16 Jan. 


p. 26 


16 Jan. 


p. 32 


30 Jan. 


p. 40 


13 Feb. 


p. 19 


13 Feb. 


p. 26 


27 Feb. 


p. 24 


27 Feb. 


p. 28 


13 Mai. 


p. 21 


27 Mar. 


p. 34 


10 Apr. 


p. 36 


24 Apr. 


p. 22 


24 Apr. 


p. 26 


8 Ma\ 


p. 25 


8 May 


p. 30 


8 May 


p. 32 


22 May 


p. 30 



A RBI technique proves radio pulls better 

than newspapers 19 June 

Retail 

Joske's in San Antonio sells via radio despite 

rains 2 Jan. 

Victor M. Ratner, R. H. Macy & Co., profile 30 Jan. 

How TV sells women 27 Feb. 

Department stores discover radio _ 27 Mar. 

Department store TV 24 Apr. 

Sears sale breaks records in Spokane .. 24 Apr. 

Grossman's radio experience 5 June 

Soaps, Cleansers, Toilet Goods 

Applause to P & G's media policy 2 Jan. 

Pears soap: the soap that slept for 9 years 19 June 



Television 

Lennen & Mitchell's TV commercials 

Favorite TV commercials 

TV program clicks for Nat'l Brewing Co. 
How well does your TV commercial sell? 
Can advertising support national TV coverage? 
Eliminating cost of TV station previews .. 

TV dictionary for sponsors 

How TV sells women 

TV commercials that sell 

TV dictionary for sponsors 

How : many viewers are you selling? 

TV influences choice of brands 

Live or film program best for sponsor? 

Basic TV-radio differences 

Department store TV 

Will TV repeat radio's summertime error? 

Chiquita Banana on CBS-TV 

Television program costs 

Feature films do extremely well, but are 

scarce 

How to use TV films effectively .. 



2 Jan. 

2 Jan. 
16 Jan. 
16 Jan. 
16 Jan. 
13 Feb. 
13 Feb. 
27 Feb. 
13 Mar. 
13 Mar. 
27 Mar. 
10 Apr. 
10 Apr. 
24 Apr. 
24 Apr. 

8 May 
22 May 
22 May 

5 June 
19 June 



5 June p. 24 
5 June p. 36 



Timebuying 

How Lennen & Mitchell radio/TV depart- 
ment functions 2 Jan. 

Spot, network or both — how to decide .. 13 Feb. 

What broadcast advertisers want to know 10 Apr. 

So you think timebuying is easy 19 June 

Basic yardsticks used by timebuyers in select- 
ing stations 19 June 

Tobacco 

"Queen For A Day," Philip Morris package 

on MBS 16 Jan. 

Oliver P. McComas, Philip Morris & Co., 

profile 27 Feb. 

Mail Pouch Tobacco's "Sports for All" .. 27 Mar. 

Pall Mall summer sales increase 8 May 

Transcriptions 

Can national advertiser build profitable pro- 
gram by using transcription library? .... 2 Jan. 

Music library shows, low cost blessing to 

sponsors 27 Mar. 

Transit Railio 

Transit radio wins D.C. decision 2 Jan. 

Markets on the move _ 27 Feb. 

Transit radio chalks up new gains ._ 5 June 

Watches, Jewelry 

Bretton watchband using radio effectively . 16 Jan. 

(oop advertising 16 Jan. 

Radio sells diamonds 30 Jan. 



p. 24 



p. 25 
p. 20 
p. 26 
p. 21 
p. 30 
p. 35 
p. 43 



p. 62 
p. 26 



p. 21 
p. 32 
p. 18 
p. 32 
p. 42 
p. 15 
p. 22 
p. 26 
p. 18 
p. 34 
p. 34 
p. 36 
p. 48 
p. 26 
p. 30 
p. 32 
p. 22 
p. 25 

p. 30 
p. 32 



p. 21 
p. 17 
p. 38 
p. 28 

p. 36 



p. 22 

p. 16 
p. 6 
p. 31 



p. 36 
p. 26 



p. 18 
p. 30 
p. 17 



p. 24 
p. 34 
p. 46 



34 



SPONSOR 



FROM NOW ON, WWJ-TV's 

advertisers can take audience 
for granted. With the number 
of sets now well beyond the 
quarter-million mark, television 
in the booming Detroit market 
has emerged completely from the 
experimental stage and reached 
the age of full pi-oductivity. 




f 



billed ! 



WWJ-TV supports its belief 
in the stability of television in 
Detroit with its new rate card 
(#8) which is guaranteed to 
advertisers for one full year! 



FIRST IN MICHIGAN 



Owned and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS 



National Representatives: THE GEORGE P HOI.l.ING BER Y COMPANY 

ASSOCIATE AM-FM STATION WWJ 



NBC Television Network 



28 AUGUST 1950 



35 




Here's the World's Champ hypo foi 



For further details on IcIIU'lCOl, consult the radio stations below, or get in 
touch with America's "hep" radio representatives who know that tello-test 
hypos ratings, and is a fertile field for national spot business. 

For TG I IO-T6ST S SUCCESS STORY, write Walter Schwimmer, Pres. 
Radio Features, Inc., 75 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago 1. 



tello-test stations 



(by the time this goes to press, we will most likely have added a dozen more !) 



Albany, N. Y WROW 

Allentown, Pa WKAP 

Altoona, Pa WJSW 

Ames, Iowa KASI 

Asbury Park, N.J WJLK 

Asheville, N. C WWNC 

Atla nta, Ga WAGA 

Atlantic City, N.J WMID 

Augusta, Ga WGAC 

Augusta, Maine WRDO 

Austin, Minn KAUS 

Baltimore, Md WITH 

Bangor, Maine WLBZ 

Battle Creek, Mich WELL 

Beaumont, Texas KPBX 

Beckley, W. Va WWNR 

Benton Harbor, Mich WHFB 

Biddeford, Maine WIDE 

Biloxi-Gulfport, Miss WLOX 

Binghamton, N. Y WENE 

Birmingham, Ala WSGN 

Bloomsburg, Pa WCNR 

Boston, Mass WNAC 

Bridgeport, Conn WICC 

Bristol, Tenn WOPI 

Buffalo, N. Y WKBW 



Cartersville, Ga WBHF 

Casper, Wyoming KVOC 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa KCRG 

Charleston, So. C WUSN 

Chicago, III WGN* 

Chicago, III WGN 

Cincinnati, Ohio WKRC 

Cleveland, Ohio WJW 

Cloq uet, Minn WKLK * 

Columbus, Ga WGBA 

Concord, N. C WEGO 

Crookston, Minn KROX 

Dayton, Ohio WING 

Denver, Colo KFEL 

Des Moines, Iowa KRNT 

Detroit, Mich WJBK 

Duluth, Minn WDSM 

Durango, Colo KIUP 

Eau Claire, Wis WBIZ 

Elizabeth City, N. C WGAI 

El Paso, Texas KTSM 

Evansville, Ind WJPS 

Fargo, N. D WDAY 

Flint, Mich WBBC 

Flint, Mich WTAC 

Fort Wayne, Ind WKJG 



Fulton, N. Y WOSC 

Gainesville, Fla WRUF 

Grand Forks, N. D KILO 

Grand Rapids, Mich WFUR * 

Grand Rapids, Mich WOOD 

Green Bay, Wis WDUZ 

Greenville, S. C WMRC 

Honolulu KPOA 

Hattiesburg, Miss WHSY 

Hayes, Kansas KAYS 

Hornell, N. Y. WWHG 

Hudson, N. Y WHUC 

Hartford, Conn WONS 

Indianapolis, Ind. WIBC 

Ja</ .son, Miss WRBC 

Johnstown, Pa WCRO 

Kansas City, Mo WHB 

Kingston, N. Y WKNY 

Kittanning, Pa WACB 

Knoxville, Tenn WROL 

LaCrosse, Wis WLCX 

Lafayette, La KVOL 

Las Vegas, Nevada KLAS 

Laurel, Miss WLAU 

Lewistown, Pa WMRF 

Liberty, N. Y WVOS 



7^ broadcasting tune-test, the show that gives tello-test a terrific run for the money! 
"j" Don Lee Network. 



TIME-BUYERS ABOUT TO PLACE 
SPOT RADIO BUSINESS FOR FALL- 



oot radio 




tello-test 



syndicated on over 250 
radio stations coast-to-coast, is the radio show with America's top 
listenership ratings, plus a record for sales results that will knock 
your eye out! 

TELLO-TEST is the granddaddy of all telephone quizzes— the show 
that started the craze for give-aways. 

If you are buying spot radio programs or spot announcements for 
fall— check the following radio stations first before you complete 
your schedules. If there are availabilities in TELLO-TEST in any of 
these markets, you're lucky . . . and your sales will hit the jackpot! 



Little Rock, Arkansas KARK 

Lock Haven, Pa WBPZ 

Logansport, Ind WSAL 

Los Angeles, Calif KHJf 

Louisville, Ky WKLO 

Louisville, Ky WLOU 

Lebanon, Pa WLBR 

Macon, Ga WNEX 

Madison, Wis WISC 

Marion, III WGGH 

Martinsburg, W. Va WEPM 

Memphis, Tenn WMPS 

Merrill, Wis WLIN 

Miami, Fla WGBS 

Michigan City, Ind WIMS 

Milwaukee, Wis WISN 

Minneapolis, Minn KSTP 

Minot, N. D KLPM 

Moline, III WQUA 

Montgomery, Ala WMGY 

Montreal, Canada CFCF 

Mt. Carmel, III WVMC 

Muskogee, Okla KBIX 

Nashville, Tenn WLAC 

Neenah, Wis WNAM 

Newburgh, N. Y WGNY 



New Orleans, La WDSU 

Newport News, Va WGH 

New York, N. Y WOR 

Ogden, Utah KOPP 

Oklahoma City, Okla KOMA 

Ottumwa, Iowa KBIZ 

Oneonta, N. Y WDOS 

Orangeburg, So. C WRNO 

Peoria, III WIRL 

Philadelphia, Pa WIP 

Pine Bluff, Ark KOTN 

Pittsburgh, Pa KDKA 

Portland, Maine WCSH 

Portland, Oregon KGW* 

Portland, Oregon KPOSf 

Pottsville, Pa WPAM 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y WKIP 

Providence, R. I WEAN 

Reading, Pa WRAW 

Roanoke, Va WSLS 

Rochester, N. Y WHAM 

San Francisco, Calif KFRCf 

St. Louis, Mo KXOK 

Saginaw, Mich WSAM 

Salt Lake City, Utah KUTA 

Savannah, Ga WTOC 



Seattle, Wash KVI f 

Shamokin, Pa WISL 

Sheboygan, Wis WHBL 

Shreveport, La KTBS 

Sioux City, Iowa KSCJ 

Sioux Falls, So. D KSOO 

Spokane, Wash KHQ 

Springfield, Mo KTTS 

Springfield, Ohio WIZE 

Steubenville, Ohio WSTV 

Syracuse, N. Y WSYR 

Topeka, Kansas WREN 

Tulsa, Okla KTUL 

Valley City, N. D KOVC 

Victoria, Texas KNAL 

Vineland, N. J WWBZ 

Warsaw, Indiana WKAM 

Washington, D. C WWDC 

Washington, D. C WWDC 

Watertown, N. Y WATN 

Wheeling, W. Va WWVA 

Wichita, Kansas KFH 

Worcester, Mass WAAB 

York, Pa WSBA 

Youngstown, Ohio WFMJ 

Zanesville, Ohio WHIZ 

plus complete Don Lee Network. 



HOSIERY 



SPONSOR: The Aquila AGENCY: Direc! 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This exclusive women s 

ready-to-wear store received 500 pairs of new nylon hose. 
The store decided upon one announcement to tell the 
women about the "seamless hose with a clock up the 
back.'' The announcement and description of the hose 
was made on the Polly The Shopper program. As a re- 
sult, they were completely sold out. About $750 gross 
for about $12.50 in advertising cost. 

KOIL, Omaha PROGRAM: Announcement 



REALTY COMPANY 



SPONSOR: Havener Realty Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The company liad an un- 

developed subdivision and wished to test public reaction 
to the location. They offered the lots at one-half of the 
price to be fixed after development. A series of announce- 
ments were used for three days at a cost of $100. As a 
result, 51 lots were sold in three days, 18 more lots the 
following week without further advertising. A total of 69 
lots sold on a $100 investment. 



WBBO. Augusta. Ga. 



PROGRAM : Announcements 




ROOKS 



SPONSOR: Greystone Press AGENCY: II. B. Humphrey Co. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Two programs, Mr. Fix It 

and Do It Yourself, were broadcast on alternate days for 
I 3 weeks. Four different Greystone Press books were ad- 
vertised and, all told, pulled !!.00C orders at an average 
sale price of $3.95; better than 123 orders per program. 
To put it another way, the client spent $5,460 in time 
cost and grossed sales amounted to $29.690 — all as a re- 
sult of 65 broadcasts. 

KNBC, San Francisco PROGRAM: Mr. Fix [t & Do It Yourself 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



SPONSOR: Hills 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Hill's decided to test this 

farm and home show for response. Future advertising 
budgets would be determined by the result. Three an- 
nouncements were bought for one day offering a double 
amount of the store's savings stamps to purchasers hear- 
ing the commercials. As a direct result of the program, 
over $500 worth of purchases were traced at a cost of less 
than $20 to the department store. 



WIBX, Utica, N. Y. 



PROGRAM: Ed Slusarczyk's 
Farm & Home Show 



JEWELRY 



SPONSOR: Helbros Watches AGENCY: Mail Order Network 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The plan was to sell Hel- 

bros watches over the air through telephone queries and 
mail. Four 10-minute recorded music shows a day were 
used. Programs offered the watch on a seven-day free 
trial. After that listener paid $34.95 for the watch. In 
seven days, 371 watches were sold for a sales gross of 
$12,966.45 as compared to under $1,000 for programing 
and time costs. Washington Helbros outlet completely 
sold out its stock. 



WWDC, Washington, D. C. 



PROGRAM: Recorded music 



AUTOMOBILES 



SPONSOR: Frank Elliott AGENCY: Marcus 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This Bedford, Ohio, auto 

dealer averages two car sales iveekly via his newscast 
sponsorship. Mr. Elliott has sponsored a news program 
for three years. Currently, he conservatively grosses in 
excess of $350,000, aided by a $6,000 advertising invest- 
ment. One additional advertising gain for Frank Elliott: 
every time radio sells a new automobile, he also gets a 
new Service Department customer. 

WSRS, Cleveland PROGRAM: Newscast 



CLOTHING 



SPONSOR: Tot-to-TovMi Sim,, AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This store, located outside 

of Flint's doiuntown shopping district, had a fire in the 
rear of its building. A large slock of spring and summer 
clothing for children suffered smoke damage. The store 
decided to advertise discounts on the clothing via radio. 
Eight one-minute announcements for approximately $120 
just about sold out the store's entire stock of children's 
clothing amounting to many thousands of dollars. 

WFDF, Flint PROGRAM: Announcements 



both Hooper and BMB report 
a change in Houston! 




„" " * 


[HOOPER 


$ 


| o O^ 




O O o <3 P 
O o t> t> 


& 








_ « 


[_ BM8 




<H 


) o o £5 


O o o o o 
o o o o o 




6 




G> 



tJ *S 



k q' "d" 



0' 



•X)' 

Y 



according to 

C. E. Hooper Inc. 



according to 
Broadcast 
Measurement 
Bureau Inc. 



SHARE OF RADIO AUDIENCE, April -May, 1950 



TIME 


SETS 
IN USE 


KTRH 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


OTHER 
AM & FM 


HOMES 
CALLED 


Mon. thru. Fri. 
8:00 A.M. - 
12:00 Noon 


15.1 


22.3 


8.3 


4.3 


2.2 


19.4 


18.3 


5.0 


16.2 


4.0 


2,525 


Sun. -Sat. Eve. 
6:00 P.M. - 
10:30 P.M. 


24.1 


27.1 


10.6 




3.5 


10.4 


21.0 


10.4 


14.5 


2.5 


7,769 



SHARE OF RADIO AUDIENCE, May -June, 1950 



TIME 


SETS 
IN USE 


KTRH 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


OTHER 
AM & FM 


HOMES 
CALLED 


Mon. thru. Fri. 
8:00 A.M. - 
12:00 Noon 


15.1 


21.5 


10.4 


6.3 


2.2 


13.0 


17.4 


8.1 


17.0 


4.1 


2,508 


Sun. -Sat. Eve. 
6:00 P.M. - 
10:30 P.M. 


21.1 


23.1 


16.4 




4.6 


10.4 


18.4 


10.7 


13.9 


2.4 


7,740 



KTRH showed an 11.2$ increase in 1949 BMB over Study No. 1 making KTRH 
the leading station in Houston with 341,940 total BMB families. KTRH BMB 
coverage includes 71 Texas counties and Western Louisiana parishes (network sta- 
tion B has 23, network station C has 57.) 

Population-wise, today KTRH serves 2,629,600* 
people as compared to a coverage population of 
2,283,700* in 1943. This increase of 345,900 
potential listeners comes to you at NO 
INCREASE IN RATES. 

KTRH 

HOUSTON 

50,000 watts • CBS • 740 KC 

Represented Nationally by John Blair & Co. 



■Sales Management Surrey of Buying Power, 194) & J950 





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— s >■ s 





Mr. Seebach 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Uietz 

The difference 
between radio 
and TV in union 
considerations is, 
of course, a mat- 
ter of men and 
time. What it 
boils down to is 
this: it takes 
more men and 
more time to pro- 
duce a TV pro- 
gram than it does to produce a radio 
show. 

You can do a radio program, for 
instance, with one engineer and one 
announcer or director representing the 
station — on a minimum staff basis. 

Your minimum for a TV show is 
something else again. You need two 
or three camera men, two boom men, 
an audio man, a switcher, a shader 
and several others. In addition, to 
complicate the picture, there are the 
matters of lighting and scenery. Again 
more men and more man hours. 
One of the reasons for more man 
hours in TV is so obvious that it might 
well be overlooked by someone not 
actively in production. It's this: TV 
equipment i> generally large and cum- 
bersome. Because it's hard to handle. 
the productivity of one man in a TV 
show is less than for a similar man 
in a radio production. 

Extra man hours come into the pic- 
ture in a most striking way when you 
consider the simple problem of con- 
necting the scene of a "remote" broad- 



Mr. Sponsor asks. 



Whttt factors are present in the television union 
picture with which radio was never concerned? 



Harold R. F. Dietz 



Sales promotion manager 

Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corp., New York 



cast or telecast with master control. 
For radio, setting up your remote con- 
nection can be done in a matter of 
five minutes. In TV allow about six 
times as long. It takes a half hour or 
more to hook up both voice and pic- 
ture lines. 

The actual process of doing a "re- 
mote" is another matter again. We 
used to be able to handle a baseball 
radio broadcast with one engineer. 
The crew on a WOR-TV telecast of a 
Dodger game at Ebbets Field num- 
bers ten. This in addition to extra 
personnel needed for TV master con- 
trol. 

So there it is. . . . Adding picture 
to sound might at first be expected 
only to double the problems of per- 
sonnel and the time needed for opera- 
tions. But in actual practice these 
problems are in the ratio of six or 
ten to one. 

Julius F. Seebach, Jr. 
Vice President in charge of 
program operations 
WOR. WOR-TV 
New York 



In television to- 
day practical so- 
lutions for over- 
lapping jurisdic- 
tional claims and 
the establishment 
of reasonable 
working condi- 
tions and rates 
are the objectives 
it which unions 
and broadcasting 
management must aim. 

Television broadcasting, combining 
as it docs the practices, personnel and 
equipment employed in radio, motion 
picture production and the theatre and 
its many related forms of entertain- 
ment. ma\ naturally be expected to 




Mr. MacDonald 



present jurisdictional difficulties at the 
outset. Some of these have already 
been resolved and the others will be 
settled in due course through the 
processes of negotiation, supplemented 
from time to time by mediation and. 
where necessary, by referral to the 
National Labor Relations Board. 

Most prominent of the jurisdictional 
questions now posed is that raised by 
the Screen Actors Guild and the Screen 
Extras Guild on the one hand and, on 
the other, the Television AuthoTitv 
which is composed of virtually all per- 
formers' unions other than the two 
Guilds. Each side concedes a large 
area to be the other's exclusive domain 
but the area of overlap, essentiallv 
that of films made especially for tele- 
vision, is so important to both unions 
and to the industry, that its resolution 
is not easy. Negotiation having been 
thus far unsuccessful, both unions have 
taken the matter to the National Labor 
Relations Board where some good pre- 
liminary work has already been done 
to facilitate the resolution of the mat- 
ter at what it is expected will be an 
early date. 

Equally important, though not in 
the viewer's eye, are the groups of 
specialists behind the scenes — scenic 
artists, engineers, production directors, 
stagehands, projectionists, writers and 
many others who contribute essential 
parts to the whole. Negotiations with 
some of these groups involve questions 
of jurisdiction but in every case the 
fundamental problem is the establish- 
ment of sound, efficient, working con- 
ditions and reasonable rates of pay. 

As they are attained, the results of 
negotiation should be embodied in 
contracts of reasonably long duration 
so that program producers may know 
what the rules and rates are for a 
period long enough so that they may 
obtain an appropriation, prepare and 
test the show and know that they can 
have at least one season's run at those 



42 



SPONSOR 




rates. This means that no contract 
should be less than 18 months in 
length, with two years as probably the 
most desirable term from all angles. 

The sponsors need the assurance of 
peaceful labor relations and readily 
projectible cost figures. And we all 
need sponsors. Without them, it would 
be very much like playing a night 
same of baseball without the field 
lights. 

Joseph A. MacDonald 

Vice President and General Attorney 

American Broadcasting, Co. 

New York 



I believe that the 
prime differences 
between union 
situation in TV 
and that in AM 
may be summa- 
rized as follows: 
1. In TV the 
industry is to 
some extent deal- 
ing in areas and 
Mr. Swezey techniques with 

which it is not familiar, such as set 
design and construction, lighting, cam- 
era and stage production, wherein 
scales and work patterns have been 
crystallized in the theatre and motion 
pictures and which cannot be made 
readily and fairly applicable to TV. 

2. There are many more job classi- 
fications in TV than exist in AM. 

3. There is tendency on part of 
unions to set up water-tight compart- 
ments of specialization within the 
operating departments and to restrict 
required duties of personnel in each 
category with a resultant loss in flexi- 
bility of operation and increased ex- 
pense. 

4. Closer jurisdictional questions 
arise with respect to performance of 
new and necessary jobs manv of which 
are interrelated. 

5. The requirements for finished 
production in TV are obviously much 
more difficult than in radio, and there 
is a tendency on the part of unions to 
request wage scales on a much higher 
level than can be reasonably paid by 
the industry in this stage of its de- 
velopment. 

Robert Swezey 
Executive Vice President 
and General Manager 
WDSU 
Neiv Orleans 

28 AUGUST 1950 



FIRST 

IN CHICAGO 



homes per dollar 



WIND 



6 MONTHS • JANUARY - JUNE, 1950 
6 AM - MID • SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 

2222 




Figures at top of col- 
umns show average 
homes per dollar* 



1111 




W-l-N-D 2 



"50-word spot, maximum frequency discount, SRDS PULSE, Jan-June, 1950, 
Metropolitan Chicago radio homes, all nets and leading independents 
included above. 

560 KC-5000 WATTS • 24 HOURS A DAY 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS • KATZ AGENCY, ft" E P 



43 




This SPONSOR department features capsuled reports of 
broadcast advertising significance culled from all seg- 
ments of the industry. Contributions are welcomed. 



Store that "talks" scores sales successes on WEBR 

For years, department stores and ing thrift dresses. Radio also ac- 

piiiited media were as inseparable as counted for 576 coats being brought 

ham and eggs. Some big retail stores to the department store's fur storage, 

totally ignored what radio could do Miss Dorothy Shank who plays 

for them. Some still do. Amanda is a merchandising expert. 

Hence we submit the profitable tale She writes all of her own copy. Aman- 

of the department store that "talks" da spends her days at the store visit- 
and sells. 

Adam. 



Meldrum. and Anderson 




Gloria Swanson brings charm to Amanda show 



ing with department personnel and 
checking on sales objectives. She es- 
tablishes and maintains a friendly co- 
operative atmosphere between the cus- 
tomer and the sales personnel. 

As a result of program sponsorship, 
there has been added impact in areas 
already served. Through Amanda and 
the show the store has become identi- 
fied as a center for hard-to-get items, 
specific name brands, and in-demand 
merchandise. The program also eases 
shopping problems for busy house- 
wives by promoting telephone orders 
and encouraging the use of charge ac- 
counts. And. incidentally, the name 
Amanda taken from the initials of the 
store insures high sponsor identifica- 
tion. * • • 



Radio covers fashions 

at JV. Y. Dress institute shotv 

Radio's fashion editors keep thou- 
sands of their women listeners well- 
informed and up-to-date on the latest 



Company of Buffalo took their first 
plunge into radio nine years ago, a 
step they've never regretted. They de- 
cided to use radio to stress store ad- 
vantages for discriminating women. 
Their program, Today With Amanda, 
on WEBR features music, news, ad- 
vice and information to women plus 
interviews with celebrities. 

A little black book is kept on radio 
results and many of the store's buyers 
have said they get better results from 
Amanda's broadcasts than they do 
from newspaper ads. Sell-outs are 
commonplace following an Amanda 
commercial. Fast radio results include 
disposal of 500 pairs of plastic cur- 
tains at a dollar a pair. A complete 
stock of Nancy Didee pants sold after 
a representative of the Company ap- Mrs - O'Dwyer greets radio fashion editors 

peared on the program. styles. Among the many attending 
Often, too, buyers will get a "hot the New York Dress Institute during 
item" something that comes in unex- Fashion Week in New York was 
pectedly and can be advertised on the CKLW, Detroit, fashion editor Mary 
air within 24 hours. Other quickie Morgan, who was greeted at the show- 
sales include 1..r>0 jars of deodorant ing by the wife of New York's recent- 
cream; hundreds of anklets and a ly-retired Mayor William O'Dwyer. 
complete clearance stock of slow-mov- * * * 





READY 
BUYING 
POWER 

UURIU 

MORE SALES 
THAN EVER 
IN RICHMOND 

Your advertising dollars go further 
and sell more on WRNL. That's 
vitally important in this Rich Rich- 
mond trading area, where progressive 
industry, established farming and 
sound economics make for lots of 
Ready Buying Power. 

COMPLETE 
COVERAGE 



That's the key to success on 
WRNL. Modern Facilities, simul- 
taneous FM Broadcasting and 
ever increasing eager-to-buy au- 
diences mean more sell from 
WRNL. 




5000 WATTS 
NON-DIRECTIONAL 

910 KC AFFILIATE 




EDWARD PETRY & CO. INC. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



44 



SPONSOR 



Radio advertising boosts storage business 95% 



Radio got a big boost by sheer co- 
incidence on the front page of the 
Mayflower Aerogram, monthly paper 
for the transportation-storage firm. 

The trade paper carried a story of 
radio time being purchased by New- 
Bell, the Norfolk agency for May- 
flower. It added: "For the past few 
months the corporation has sponsored 
three nightly news broadcasts over 
WNOR." 

The present programing schedule 
includes the newscasts, alternate New 



York Yankee baseball games in 1950, 
and all special events. 

Right alongside the radio sponsor- 
ship story was a story featuring sales 
standings for the first quarter of 1950. 
New-Bell Storage Corporation of Nor- 
folk bad "sold its way into the top 
bracket in the 100,000 to 250,000 
population group." 

The corporation reports business up 
over 95% over the same period last 
year and radio is given full credit. 

• • * 



Disks and chatter reap dollars for eight sponsors 



A disk jockey show flavored with 
household hints has provided a sales 
pay-off for eight International Harves- 
ter dealers. 

Cooperatively sponsored, the show 
was presented on KGEM. ABC affiliate 
in Boise. Household hints were read 
between records and listeners were in- 
vited to vote for the hint they liked 
best. The contestants were encouraged 
to bring their votes personally to their 
nearest International Harvester dealer. 
The response was overwhelming, 
amounting to some 30,000 cards and 
letters. 

For the listener submitting the most 
popular hint for the week there was a 



Ford dealer sponsors 
woman editor's vacation 

Drive a Ford and feel the difference. 

The Alexander Motor Company of 
Durham believes in that slogan and 
they've added a new touch to their 
radio advertising to put it across. 

This Ford dealer has bought part of 
the vacation time of Frances Jarman, 
editor of WDNC's Women's News Let- 
ter. For 15 minutes each day Miss 
Jarman will present an on-the-spot re- 
port of the places she visits. 

She'll travel in a Ford Tudor and 
program commercials will be built 
around her experiences with Ford's 
driving comfort, performance and 
economy of operation. 

The program itself. Vacationing 
With Frances, will feature word pic- 
ture reports from North Carolina, 
Tennessee. Alabama, Louisiana, Mis- 
sissippi and Georgia. The show will 
be taped and airmailed to WDNC for 
presentation the following day. * * * 

28 AUGUST 1950 



free electrical appliance. At the close 
of the contest, which ran two months, 
a grand prize winner was awarded a 
choice between a freezer and a refrig- 
erator. 

For the eight co-sponsors there was 
increased floor traffic in their stores. 
And, as a result, the International Har- 
vester dealers had a busy and profita- 




Co-op show pulls in 30,000 cards, letters 

ble time converting their radio listen- 
ers into owners of IH refrigeration. 

* • • 

Briefly . . . 

Nearly 26,500 copies of "You Can 
Play The Ukelele" by WCBS program 
director Don Ball have been sold in 
the past six weeks. The current ukelele 
craze was started by CBS' Arthur God- 
frey through his radio and TV shows. 
* * -::- 

Hooper, Nielsen and others please 
note. A commercial notice in the 14 
August New York Times reads: "If 
you're having 50 women at a club 
meeting before Sept. 1, you can earn 
money for your favorite charity by 
having members give their opinions of 
a radio program. Telephone PL 
3-4565 for details." 




OKLAHOMA'S GREATEST 



STATION FOR 



YEARS 



Reaching 

More People 

At 

Lower Cost 

The 1946 Broadcast Measure- 
ment Bureau Study gave KVOO 
a total of 347,450 daytime and 
378,520 nighttime families. 
The 1949 BMB Station Audience 
Report showed increased KVOO 
coverage as follows: daytime 
BMB families, 411,380; nighttime 
455,920. 

With no increase in rates since 
1946 these increased KVOO 
BMB families mean increased 
coverage at lower cost per family. 
An added factor of great impor- 
tance is that 64% of KVOO 
BMB families report 6 and 7 day 
per week listing to Oklahoma's 
greatest Station! 

This important bonus comes to 
advertisers as a direct result of 
KVOO's 25 years of dominance 
in Oklahoma's number one mar- 
ket. 

See your nearest Edward Petry 
& Company office or call, wire or write 

KVOO direct for availabilities. 

NBC AFFILIATE 

50,000 Watts 




BLANKETS OKLAHOMA'S 
NO. 1 MARKET 



45 



m 



THRIFTY 
Covera ge 

of the South's largest 
Trading Area